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Old 04-11-2012, 02:47 PM   #76
PaulRS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
I wish you had comparative photos of the peen bosses too.
Your wish is my command.

The last pic is from the later web, here's one from the earlier one, /5-/6 me thinks.



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Old 04-11-2012, 02:53 PM   #77
supershaft
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There are beefier duplex webs. By mid /7 for sure. I think they did it in a couple of stages.

The old pin will work fine. You use the same hole in the web. It's the bearing that needs to be drilled and reamed. I recommend having someone with experience do it. It's a tricky job to do it right no matter which way it is done.
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Old 04-11-2012, 02:55 PM   #78
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Thanks PaulRS!
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:11 PM   #79
jackd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulRS View Post
Plse explain the difference.
I know peened over, but staked I don't know the Dutch translation.

As far as I can see from this, the hole isn't running the length of the part, but a little off-set.
The pin is inserted from the bearing side and locked by a square pushed in.

This better?



Here you can see 1/2-2/3 of the pin off-set through the hole and the square pressing.

Paul.
Staking is something that was once used commonly in aviation back in the day before self locking fasteners became common. I've seen lots of it on old British machines. A pin punch was used to distort the nut/bolt threads at 120 degree intervals around a fastener. I would say that the 'square' in the above photo could be defined as being such a method.
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Old 04-11-2012, 06:30 PM   #80
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackd View Post
Staking is something that was once used commonly in aviation back in the day before self locking fasteners became common. I've seen lots of it on old British machines. A pin punch was used to distort the nut/bolt threads at 120 degree intervals around a fastener. I would say that the 'square' in the above photo could be defined as being such a method.
After reading your description of staking I don't understand how that pin is staked?

I use to work on prewar US aircraft a lot and I have never seen or heard of any aviation threads staked. For a situation like I think you are describing I have seen different standardized threads used that have an interference thread. The adjuster studs and lock nuts on Travel Air interplane struts comes to mind as do the adjuster lock nuts on a couple of parasol wing struts.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:17 PM   #81
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And as far as interchangeability goes the timing chain tensioners will both work on either type chain? I'm putting a question mark there because I haven't got one to look at but nobody said I couldn't so I guess I'll have to try and compare them myself, if this ever comes up.

If I remember the directions for installing the pins. The hole for the pin is drilled in several steps so the pin is an interference fit and the Aluminum of the web is crushed with a punch, the factory used a square punch, I think a small chisel will work also. The "stake" is to prevent the pin falling out. If there is not enough metal for this in the old place the pin was then put it in another place. I've never done this but think that would be the way.

A small bolt held in with Red Locktight might be better but I'll wait for some expert to tell me how that works, how to properly install it.

I don't see much problem with the pin. The OP's pin was not properly staked at the factory so it fell out. The problem when rebuilding the lower end of the engines is selecting the proper bearings for the size crank you have.
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