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Old 04-26-2012, 08:36 AM   #16
MattySull OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPSpen View Post
Welcome to the R-65... Their is something that compells one to buy it, fix it up, and resell it..

The you find out it's just a hoot to ride.....No, It's not fast.. But something about it makes it fun...

So you wind up keeping it....

As far as the pushrod seal goes.. You have to basically pull the head and slide the cylinder far enough out to get the new seal in there.. Then just slide it all back together, Reinstall and GENTLY torque the head, Reset the valves and off you go..

I can't stress enough how important it is to have a good torque wrench and gently bring the studs up to almost the recommend value... Almost... Many have pulled a stud by being less than extreeeeeeeeeeemly careful....

Have fun...

John

You know from working on cars I wouldn't even have thought the block is aluminum. It certainly looks aluminum but I just didn't process that thought yet haha. Well that would make torquing a very careful practice indeed. Don't want to have to retap a block if I can avoid it.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:40 PM   #17
Wirespokes
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Most of us torque them to 25ft pounds, but do remember that if a fastener is oily, you'll need to reduce that figure by about a third.
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Old 04-28-2012, 05:30 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by MattySull View Post
Well, I sure wish I came here to see if anyone had it first.
If you read the feedback for the seller, that should be enough reason to stay away.
That's what the feedback is for. In this case it explains alot about this fellows "quality".
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Old 04-28-2012, 07:32 AM   #19
Bill Harris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wirespokes View Post
Most of us torque them to 25ft pounds, but do remember that if a fastener is oily, you'll need to reduce that figure by about a third.
I've always assumed and/or read that the torque value is for an oiled thread. 17 ft-lbs oiled seems way low.

Back in the day when I was a young buck, I took the book value of 28 literally and retorqued the heads frequently, even before valve adjustments. Ended up stripping 6 of the 8 studs, and 30 years later re-repairing those threads because I used a poor state-of-the-art insert at the time.

Nowadays I retorque the heads infrequently, usually only when the rocker arms need to be removed ot adjusted. Live'n'learn...
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:40 PM   #20
Wirespokes
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Funny, I always figured torque values were for clean, dry threads. Just checked, and neither the Haynes or Clymer says anything about this.

The 90S shop manual doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me on this point.

It says:

Tightening torques and preload forces

Applicable only to bolts in accordance with DIN (a bunch of different ones follow) and nuts with a nut height of 0.8 X d in accordance with DIN 934 and exclusively for u ges = 0.14 (Bolts phosphate treated, nuts without aftertreatment or galvanized. Lubricated condition: either non-lubricated or oiled.)

For cad plated bolts or nuts (u ges is roughly = 0.08 to 0.09) the tightening torque must be roughly = 30% less than in the table with the same utilization factor of the bolt material.

Not applicable when another surface or lubricated condition of the thread is used or if there is a variation in the nut height. In such cases it is necessary to determine the values separately.


When it says "either non-lubricated or oiled." is it referring to the nut?

And under the Not applicable section is states "when...lubricated condition of the thread is used..."

Seems something was lost in translation.
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Old 04-28-2012, 09:15 PM   #21
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPSpen View Post
Welcome to the R-65... Their is something that compells one to buy it, fix it up, and resell it..

The you find out it's just a hoot to ride.....No, It's not fast.. But something about it makes it fun...

So you wind up keeping it....

As far as the pushrod seal goes.. You have to basically pull the head and slide the cylinder far enough out to get the new seal in there.. Then just slide it all back together, Reinstall and GENTLY torque the head, Reset the valves and off you go..

I can't stress enough how important it is to have a good torque wrench and gently bring the studs up to almost the recommend value... Almost... Many have pulled a stud by being less than extreeeeeeeeeeemly careful....

Have fun...

John
Do people really replace push rod tube seals like that? I would highly recommend taking the cylinder off and replacing the O-rings, cleaning the sealing surface and applying some Durko, adding a cylinder O-ring if it doesn't have one and has the recess for it. I would clean the combustion chamber too and re-align the rings. Remove the lifters too and check for pitting. Of course, before I took it apart I would do a leak down test and see if any valves are leaking and take care of that while I was there if need be.

Myself and others I have known use to torque down heads to 28ftlbs no problem until I heard of everybody else stripping them. I now torque them to 26ftlbs per a BMW service bulletin. The bulletin was about reducing cylinder distortion on nikisil cylinders, not pulling the studs but . . . .

I put 106,000 miles on a LS. Lots of fun! Good handlers but my setup always under steered. Siebenrock makes a cam for them. I would like to try raising the CR, a cam, and some carbs on one. Personally, I wouldn't go with a bigger bore. It's already short stroke enough IMO at 1.33:1. The same as a R100. And the shorter cylinders are my favorite part of them so I certainly wouldn't want to put a bigger engine in.

supershaft screwed with this post 04-28-2012 at 09:25 PM
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Old 04-29-2012, 04:59 AM   #22
Bill Harris
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Quote:
Funny, I always figured torque values were for clean, dry threads. Just checked, and neither the Haynes or Clymer says anything about this.

The 90S shop manual doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me on this point.

It says:

Tightening torques and preload forces...
Haynes or Clymer is hardly an immutable authority on torque values. The charts in the factory manuals are canned DIN references.

Consider it in context: how often are you going to torque (or retorque) cylinder head nuts in a dry condition? 17 ft-lbs is an absurdly low value for head bolt torque.

But use it if you want to... :)
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Old 04-29-2012, 08:07 AM   #23
MattySull OP
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I've got a little update other than torque specs. I went cruising around for a few hours and noticed I have been hitting a false neutral between 2nd and 3rd. If I shift up from this neutral I go straight to 3rd. I will attempt to adjust the shifter lever because it has some play in it. I've read preloading the shifter lever helps too so I will practice that technique and see how it goes.
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Old 05-01-2012, 09:17 AM   #24
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welcome to the adventure of R65 ownership...

have you signed up for the R65 forum too?

http://www.bmwr65.org/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl

btw, is that ebay seat the one from Vietnam?
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:53 AM   #25
MattySull OP
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Originally Posted by mrbindc View Post
welcome to the adventure of R65 ownership...

have you signed up for the R65 forum too?

http://www.bmwr65.org/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl

btw, is that ebay seat the one from Vietnam?
I have yet to sign up for R65.org and the seat is from Vietnam.
A guy in a previous post mentioned the hondaclassic31 seller had terrible reviews and I can't entirely agree with that. He had about 4 reviews mentioning quality issues of a specific honda cafe racer seatcover
and I would absolutely expect mediocre quality out of the seat I'm getting but as far as terrible reviews I don't see many.

I'll sign up for the forum soon.
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