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Old 03-16-2007, 10:00 AM   #16
Liamo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emelgee
Have you tried getting into a modern 600cc sportsbike to check the valve clearances - a major PITA.
I did the valve clearances on my old Bandit 600, irt wa smy first time doing such a job and it wasnt hard at all. That said, it was a tappet set up which is quite easy.

Is removing the shims difficult and do you need any special tools?
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:29 AM   #17
emelgee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liamo
I did the valve clearances on my old Bandit 600, irt wa smy first time doing such a job and it wasnt hard at all. That said, it was a tappet set up which is quite easy.

Is removing the shims difficult and do you need any special tools?
I was refering to the likes of the new Yam R6's and Honda CBR600's with wrap around aluminium frames - loads of bodywork to come off, and very tight access when you actually get down to the top of the engine.

If you can do the valves on a Bandit then the KTM isn't really that much more difficult. You don't need any special tools to get the shims out, just remove the cams and use a magnet to lift the bucket and shim off the top of the valve - piece of cake. Due to the design of the engine you don't have to disturb the camchain to lift the cams out which makes life a lot easier. There's plenty of space to work on the cyclinder heads if you push the radiator out of the way.
It's also a good idea to balance the carbs afterwards.
There's plenty of threads on this subject if you need more info.
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:44 AM   #18
Liamo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emelgee
I was refering to the likes of the new Yam R6's and Honda CBR600's with wrap around aluminium frames - loads of bodywork to come off, and very tight access when you actually get down to the top of the engine.

If you can do the valves on a Bandit then the KTM isn't really that much more difficult. You don't need any special tools to get the shims out, just remove the cams and use a magnet to lift the bucket and shim off the top of the valve - piece of cake. Due to the design of the engine you don't have to disturb the camchain to lift the cams out which makes life a lot easier. There's plenty of space to work on the cyclinder heads if you push the radiator out of the way.
It's also a good idea to balance the carbs afterwards.
There's plenty of threads on this subject if you need more info.
cheers for that emelgee, is taking the cams off not a big job, well actually is putting them back in properly noy a big job?

I'll dig up those threads closer to when I'm doing, but just to know how much beer to bring when I'm calling down to my wrench-handy friend
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:49 AM   #19
emelgee
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As long as you make sure you line up the dots/crosses on the cam sprockets correctly before you lift the cams out, then getting them back in correctly isn't difficult - you'll see what I mean when you do it.
KTM do a tool for locking the crank in position when you're working on the engine, which is a good idea.
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Old 03-16-2007, 12:49 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emelgee
Just done a full service on mine, including valve clearances and I can't see what the problem is. It's certainly no harder than any other fully faired large CC bike. Have you tried getting into a modern 600cc sportsbike to check the valve clearances - a major PITA.
Checkin' the valve clearances, or even changing the plugs on my CBR is WAY harder than on my 950. I'd much rather do maintenance on the big Katoom than on any of my other bikes, outside of the Husky and Penton (air-cooled 2-smokes).
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DISCLAIMER: All observations made in this post are mine and based solely on my own anecdotal experiences, and may contain large doses of facetiousness. YMMV, of course. You are "on your own", and I take no responsibility if someone tries anything in this post and gets into trouble with the law, damages their person or property, or goes blind. Take everything you read or hear "anywhere" butt especially on the Web with a large dose of salt.

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Old 03-16-2007, 01:43 PM   #21
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It's definately all about what you're used to/tolerant of in terms of the 950 being a hassle to maintain. My previous bike was Yamaha GTS1000 (yes, the one with the front swingarm) and man did that thing suck to work on. What I hated most about it was how NEEDLESSLY complex the GTS's maintinence access was. That bike was a hideous mess of parts, plugs, wires and bodywork, I even had to pull my entire GIVI rack just to bleed the rear brakes!

Sure, there's lots to remove to work on the KTM's engine, but careful Austrian engineering is evident at every turn, and I think the design is very smart. I'm willing to work a little harder to maintain my KTM if there's a good reason that it's so complex, and there is: the 950 is light and amazingly compact!

My 950 has been totally reliable and the most entertaining motorcycle I've ever owned. Besides, nothing worth doing it ever easy.
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Old 03-16-2007, 01:51 PM   #22
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Well put, Rumpus (why does that sound weird to say?)
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Old 03-17-2007, 01:00 AM   #23
ipe5520
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990 Adventure is built well

My 2006 990 Adventure has 16,000 kms on it and has had no major problem even with a major spill. I was taking a curve at over a hundred kms/hour and went right over a diesel spill. I low sided and the bike hit the pavement hard and skidded for about 50 meters and fell completely into a ditch. After it was pulled out, amazingly it just started and not even the mirrors required adjusting! I think if I were on a BMW GS, I would have had real major repairs with a cracked engine cylinder head for sure. The KTM Adventures can take a lot of beating The repair job cost me only US$15 to replace the busted plastic tank cover. Amaaazing indeed!!
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Old 05-05-2012, 06:55 PM   #24
patrkbukly
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Well said...Bravo !!

Spoken like a true 2 wheeled American poet. Right on. I concur. Right on.Over and out.
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Old 05-06-2012, 12:33 AM   #25
GrenDesb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kawidad View Post
Sorry, but I have to respectfully disagree with this. It is better than some, but because of the compact design of the engine compartment, it is a royal pain in the azz.

(Not to mention the overly complicated body work that has to be removed to literally do anything.)

No knock, just being realistic.
You take the tanks off at every 10 000 miles and do what has to be done all at once and it is easy and straight forward.

At the every two 5000 miles, you skip the oil tank screen and do the oil change without having to touch the body work.

Sure if a guy wake up a sunday morning and decides to change the spark plugs just cause he feels like it he will hate the thing for sure.

It's designed to race, it's designed to service everything all at once and when you do so, like others have said, it is a charm.

My 2c
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Old 05-06-2012, 05:49 AM   #26
sstewart
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Ktm

I have recently had my first major malfunction with a second hand ADV. My other Adventure(travel bike) has never left me stranded. That being said,I have owned a couple of BMW bikes that have. Coincidence? Maybe,but my limited experience with BMW bikes has made me like my KTM's even more. I'm not bashing,just telling my opinion.
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:47 PM   #27
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I have 50,000 miles on my 06 950.

I have been in 40 states with it including AK and the Arctic Circle most of these miles two up. My wife thinks it is the most comfy bike we have ever owned.

My bike has been upside down into a pile of boulders in NC with a friend riding it. I picked it up and road it home..... after I took my man to the emergency room.

It has fallen off a peninsula into a lake in Utah and been bounced off the rev limiter at least 100 times.

I have been in deep sand pits and under a few boulders....(beside em anyway):)


It has been in temps ranging from 128 in Artesia NM to 10 in Port Hope mi.

I have done several 1000 plus mile days.

I like it so much I bought a new 990 and have no intentions of selling the 950.

It has never broke down or left me anywhere.


I do try to pay attention to all the prevent maintenance and info here at the OC.


I have owned several BMWs, but will never be without a Katoom.

Life is just too short not to smile while you're riding.
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Old 05-06-2012, 08:24 PM   #28
SauceSquatch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whip View Post
I have 50,000 miles on my 06 950.

I have been in 40 states with it including AK and the Arctic Circle most of these miles two up. My wife thinks it is the most comfy bike we have ever owned.

My bike has been upside down into a pile of boulders in NC with a friend riding it. I picked it up and road it home..... after I took my man to the emergency room.

It has fallen off a peninsula into a lake in Utah and been bounced off the rev limiter at least 100 times.

I have been in deep sand pits and under a few boulders....(beside em anyway):)


It has been in temps ranging from 128 in Artesia NM to 10 in Port Hope mi.

I have done several 1000 plus mile days.

I like it so much I bought a new 990 and have no intentions of selling the 950.

It has never broke down or left me anywhere.


I do try to pay attention to all the prevent maintenance and info here at the OC.


I have owned several BMWs, but will never be without a Katoom.

Life is just too short not smile while your riding.
Whip, cheers to you!

That is very reassuring to read, I'm still a KTM newb but I've been riding almost half my life. I have a tendency to tinker, break then fix :) I'm not used to my 990 yet, only 700 miles and the more I read in the OC about issues the more I "think" I hear things. I have a week long trip coming up in a few days in the mountains, me and this big pig are gonna get to know each other
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Old 05-07-2012, 10:57 AM   #29
gefr
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I believe preventative maintenance is the secret.

Especially for 950Advs. Check the newby thread by Geek. Cheers
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