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Old 05-08-2012, 11:35 PM   #16
omaas
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Location: Melhus, Norway
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I got my Stelvio 1200 8V 23th of May last year and got 14800 km on it, mostly 2 up.
I love the bike, it is an excellent tourer with grate comfort and ability to handle gravel roads.

The difference between NTX and 8V here in Norway is:
8V have a smaller screen and cast wheels, same size tyre as NTX (150/70-17 and 110/80-19) and different colours. The rest is actually a set of accessories delivered as standard equipments for the NTX.



-OMAAS
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:01 AM   #17
deWog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Precis View Post
.......... I'd do 2500km runs, including sections where the police would tell riders to "go as fast as you can!"
.......
- where are these mythical roads where the police tell riders to create merry hell?

dW
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:03 AM   #18
Moronic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omaas View Post
I got my Stelvio 1200 8V 23th of May last year and got 14800 km on it, mostly 2 up.
I love the bike, it is an excellent tourer with grate comfort and ability to handle gravel roads.

The difference between NTX and 8V here in Norway is:
8V have a smaller screen and cast wheels, same size tyre as NTX (150/70-17 and 110/80-19) and different colours. The rest is actually a set of accessories delivered as standard equipments for the NTX.



-OMAAS
Yes, I'd seen the European versions of the new 8V were specced with the 150 rear tyre even on the cast wheels, acc to various reviews. Right move IMO. Should offer more precision than a 180 on bumpy backroads, and you could still fit knobbies if desired, ridden with care.

The Australian importer is still listing the rear tyre as a 180, which is confusing. I'm thinking that is an oversight in the specs, as I can't quite credit Guzzi speccing a wider cast rear wheel just for Australia, nor even just for Oz and the US. Has anyone seen an Oz version of the new cast-wheel bike up close to confirm?

omaas, is there anything else you would like to tell us after a year and 15,000km with the new 8V model?

How is the standard suspension for two-up work? Firm enough?

What panniers have you fitted?

And how is the fuel consumption? Do you like the big range?
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:25 AM   #19
DirtisGood
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Location: Sheffield the Town of Murals, Tasmania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
Yes, I'd seen the European versions of the new 8V were specced with the 150 rear tyre even on the cast wheels, acc to various reviews. Right move IMO. Should offer more precision than a 180 on bumpy backroads, and you could still fit knobbies if desired, ridden with care.

The Australian importer is still listing the rear tyre as a 180, which is confusing. I'm thinking that is an oversight in the specs, as I can't quite credit Guzzi speccing a wider cast rear wheel just for Australia, nor even just for Oz and the US. Has anyone seen an Oz version of the new cast-wheel bike up close to confirm?

omaas, is there anything else you would like to tell us after a year and 15,000km with the new 8V model?

How is the standard suspension for two-up work? Firm enough?

What panniers have you fitted?

And how is the fuel consumption? Do you like the big range?
I purchased the first retailed Stelvio NTX 2011 8V in Australia, what can I say after covering 16K so far and still smiling after every corner. I ride this bike nearly always offroad and it is a blast. At the moment I am trying to get a Stelvio Owners Get Together happening in Tasmania next year. I have Web Site up and running. http://www.wix.com/eagledream/stelvio-owners-tassie
Don't be afraid to purchase one of these NTX's they are brilliant.
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Old 05-09-2012, 05:14 AM   #20
Precis
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Location: Lumpy part of Victoria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deWog View Post
- where are these mythical roads where the police tell riders to create merry hell?
dW
Long ago (pre 1980) and far away (in a country which no longer exists: Rhodesia).
Due to terrorist activity (the modern term is "insurgents"), traffic on major roads was conducted in military-escorted convoys. These travelled at the speed of the slowest vehicle - often a 30-year-old Morris towing a caravan.
So when bikes turned up at the assembly points, the coppers would give you the option of joining the convoy - or taking your chances alone and at whatever speed you could manage.
Bear in mind the roads were utterly superb, that all vegetation was cut back about 40 metres on either side of the road to remove potential cover and that fences were generally pretty good, especially in the beef-farming areas.
Wild game was a bit more of an issue - elephants are remarkably difficult to see!
Given that the major towns are usually 150 - 200km apart and most riders chose to "take their chances" - I never heard of anyone who crashed while travelling at extreme speeds in the complete absence of other vehicles.
But I did once find some holes in my luggage - wrecked a new pair of Levis....
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:32 AM   #21
omaas
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Location: Melhus, Norway
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
omaas, is there anything else you would like to tell us after a year and 15,000km with the new 8V model?

How is the standard suspension for two-up work? Firm enough?

What panniers have you fitted?

And how is the fuel consumption? Do you like the big range?

I am very happy with my Stelvio, it's working fine for me, commuting, fun riding and long trips.

During a trip to northern part of Norway (4500 km), was the bike loaded almost to the maximum weight (495 kg) and was firm enough for riding bumpy and twisty roads with confidence an comfort for both of us. It was no problem driving for 10 to 12 hours a day.
I have added a Laminar Lip to avoid buffering for the passenger in speed > 90 km/h.
The suspension was set up to maximum pre-load and the rebound on the rear suspension was set up 2 or 3 clicks firmer then the book said.

I have MG standard luggage boxes and MG Tank bag.


The fuel consumption < 5,5 litre Pr. 100 km, this gives me the low fuel warning light after 420-450 km. It should be 7 litre left, but on my bike it is 8 litre. My maximum travel between filling up is 580 km and 28 litre, still 3 litre left.
I love the feeling of starting up with full tank and know I can drive a whole day.

-omaas

omaas screwed with this post 05-17-2012 at 09:40 AM
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:21 AM   #22
WitchCityBallabio
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360 miles is a hell of a range!

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Old 05-10-2012, 07:03 AM   #23
Moronic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omaas View Post
I am very happy with my Stelvio, it's working fine for me, commuting, fun riding and long trips.

During a trip to northern part of Norway (4500 km), was the bike loaded almost to the maximum weight (495 kg) and was firm enough for riding bumpy and twisty roads with confidence an comfort for both of us. It was no problem driving for 10 to 12 hours a day.
I have added a Laminar Lip to avoid buffering for the passenger in speed > 90 km/h.
The suspension was set up to maximum pre-load and the rebound on the rear suspension was set up 2 or 3 clicks firmer then the book said.

I have MG standard luggage boxes and MG Tank bag.
http://omaas.smugmug.com/Motorcycles...80010600-M.jpg

The fuel consumption < 5,5 litre Pr. 100 km, this gives me the low fuel warning light after 420-450 km. It should be 7 litre left, but on my bike it is 8 litre. My maximum travel between filling up is 580 km and 28 litre, still 3 litre left.
I love the feeling of starting up with full tank and know I can drive a whole day.

-omaas
Omass thank you very much for your prompt reply. You have answered all my questions in a very satisfying way. This bike really is looking quite spectacular.

Better than 5.5L/100km and a 32L tank implies a really fabulous touring range, which you confirm with your 580km real-life example. Wow!

Sounds like she really is comfy, too.

Thanks too for the pic of your bike with the plastic luggage. There aren't many around, so it is interesting to see.

That is looking more and more like my next bike. You've even got the key additions I was thinking of: extra lights and the hand guards. Although I'd consider the factory head-protectors as well, in case of low-speed tip-overs, ugly though they may be.
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Old 05-10-2012, 01:41 PM   #24
go-GS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omaas View Post
I am very happy with my Stelvio, it's working fine for me, commuting, fun riding and long trips.

During a trip to northern part of Norway (4500 km), was the bike loaded almost to the maximum weight (495 kg) and was firm enough for riding bumpy and twisty roads with confidence an comfort for both of us. It was no problem driving for 10 to 12 hours a day.
I have added a Laminar Lip to avoid buffering for the passenger in speed > 90 km/h.
The suspension was set up to maximum pre-load and the rebound on the rear suspension was set up 2 or 3 clicks firmer then the book said.

I have MG standard luggage boxes and MG Tank bag.
http://omaas.smugmug.com/Motorcycles...80010600-M.jpg

The fuel consumption < 5,5 litre Pr. 100 km, this gives me the low fuel warning light after 420-450 km. It should be 7 litre left, but on my bike it is 8 litre. My maximum travel between filling up is 580 km and 28 litre, still 3 litre left.
I love the feeling of starting up with full tank and know I can drive a whole day.

-omaas
Good to see there's one more of this (orange) version in Norway. I've checked, there's only two of us so far:)
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:33 PM   #25
Precis
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Location: Lumpy part of Victoria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
Omass thank you very much for your prompt reply. You have answered all my questions in a very satisfying way. This bike really is looking quite spectacular.

Better than 5.5L/100km and a 32L tank implies a really fabulous touring range, which you confirm with your 580km real-life example. Wow!

Sounds like she really is comfy, too.

Thanks too for the pic of your bike with the plastic luggage. There aren't many around, so it is interesting to see.

That is looking more and more like my next bike. You've even got the key additions I was thinking of: extra lights and the hand guards. Although I'd consider the factory head-protectors as well, in case of low-speed tip-overs, ugly though they may be.
Omass' bike looks to be the Stelvio 8v (Orange, and cast wheels); a lot of the "extra" gear is fitted as standard to the Stelvio NTX - and the rear rim is narrower, so more off-road oriented tyres will fit.
However, here in Australia, you're going to get reamed by the dealer/importer: a new Stelvio in Canada is under $17k - here, it's close to $25k - and our dollar is stronger than theirs!
I fail to see that the cost of complying with absurd ADRs can possibly add about 30% to the cost of a vehicle.
This is the main reason I've resisted buying a Stelvio - while I'm firmly a Guzzi-guy and believe the Stelvio is in every way a match for the even-more-expensive GSA and a much more involving ride than the Super10 - I dislike shaking hands with the people who've just robbed me!
Thus I'm very content with my older Guzzis and a pair of Caponords (one street, one dirt)
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Old 05-10-2012, 06:21 PM   #26
Holeshot08
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When will it be here?

I ordered my Lava Black NTX 4 weeks ago for $14900.00 in Minnesota, I had a box of new add on's and a case of oil filters delivered today. Yesterday I sat in a chair and endured 4 hours of agony getting my Moto Guzzi logo tat under my right arm to match my HD emblem on my left arm. I have my new riding gear and boots...where the heck in my new Stelvio NTX???

Thanks for the sympathy!

Chuck
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Old 05-10-2012, 09:22 PM   #27
silvergoose
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High wind lane changer

996DL, sorry for the late reply. The Stelvio does not react as quickly to wind gust as some of the bikes I have ridden. The KTM 990 and the BMW GS adventure seem to be more sensitive to side winds than the Stelvio. The weight of the bikes are close enough, it seems like KTM and the BMW have a lot of flat surface. I did not ride either bike a great distance, about 50-75 miles, I was tired just trying to keep the bike in the lane. You may have a different feeling, but with the lack of large side panels the Moto Guzzi just seemed less tiring to ride.

Good Luck
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Old 05-10-2012, 10:51 PM   #28
Moronic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Precis View Post
Omass' bike looks to be the Stelvio 8v (Orange, and cast wheels); a lot of the "extra" gear is fitted as standard to the Stelvio NTX - and the rear rim is narrower, so more off-road oriented tyres will fit.
However, here in Australia, you're going to get reamed by the dealer/importer: a new Stelvio in Canada is under $17k - here, it's close to $25k - and our dollar is stronger than theirs!
Precis, it's not quite that bad. The stock rear tyre on omaas's Orange 8V was the narrower 150, as he said in his first post. A step forward from the previous model, I think. And as far as I can see, the 8V is $20K reccomended in Oz, or about $22K on the road. Plus panniers tho.

The latest NTX is $23K, or indeed $25K on the road. I'm not sure I want those metal boxes it comes with.

BTW: enjoyed your tale of Rhodesian roulette.

The best news for me coming out of this is omaas's confirmation of the fuel consumption and range. A big tank and a frugal engine and good manners on gravel add up to a properly exploratory tourer.
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Old 05-10-2012, 11:22 PM   #29
996DL
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Thanks silvergoose !

996DL
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Old 05-10-2012, 11:59 PM   #30
go-GS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blakebird View Post
True - the U.S. gets just the NTX, in matte black or burnt orange. No standard Stelvio here.

The NTX comes with Behr wheels and the Alpina SST spoked / tubeless wheel system in the narrower 150/70-17 size. Other markets get the std model in burnt orange with the cast wheels in "sportbike standard" 180/55-17 and 120/70-17.

I wish that gondola was making better time
There seems to be a misunderstanding. The only cast wheel delivered on the Stelvio is 150/70. These were introduced with the 2011 version(2012 version in US).

BTW, it's a great bike - the best I owned so far:) My previos bikes were Multistrada, GS1200, GSA1200 and HP2 Enduro. I think Stelvio has picked the best capabilities from the Multi (engine, soul, character) and the GS-range (Offroad, Comfort). Stelvio is a keeper - it's good to be back on an Italian bike again:)
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go-GS screwed with this post 05-11-2012 at 12:07 AM
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