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Old 06-13-2012, 04:16 PM   #16
_cy_
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choices in Europe will be completely different than in America. In the good ole USA we are gear nuts, so number of outlets/choices available are huge.

the good news is trickle down technology is past tense. used to be big $$$ was a requirement for a super nice tent. but now days, very nice 2-3 mans tents can be had for $150- $250. you can pay lots more, but benefits diminishes.

note I'm speaking about the US market place. first place I'd go is close out resellers. one can scoop up a killer deal on last years model. who care if tent design is a few years old. state of the art for tents happened years ago. sure minor improvement are always happening. but they very similar to last years models.

if one is looking for a deal on world class gear. specifying models is next to worthless, if full price is say $450. when the deal happens at say $225 or less.

check out what currently available at places like ... http://www.sierratradingpost.com/tents~d~228/
what's in stock is what counts. most of the high end models will more than fit your needs.

_cy_ screwed with this post 06-13-2012 at 04:25 PM
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:38 PM   #17
Dogscout
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Big Vestibule

I really like my Hilleberg but it is expensive. The biggest recommendation that I can give is "get the one with the biggest vestibule you can."
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:47 PM   #18
ssevy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _cy_ View Post
choices in Europe will be completely different than in America. In the good ole USA we are gear nuts, so number of outlets/choices available are huge.

the good news is trickle down technology is past tense. used to be big $$$ was a requirement for a super nice tent. but now days, very nice 2-3 mans tents can be had for $150- $250. you can pay lots more, but benefits diminishes.

note I'm speaking about the US market place. first place I'd go is close out resellers. one can scoop up a killer deal on last years model. who care if tent design is a few years old. state of the art for tents happened years ago. sure minor improvement are always happening. but they very similar to last years models.

if one is looking for a deal on world class gear. specifying models is next to worthless, if full price is say $450. when the deal happens at say $225 or less.

check out what currently available at places like ... http://www.sierratradingpost.com/tents~d~228/
what's in stock is what counts. most of the high end models will more than fit your needs.
I have a Losi 2 storm I bought on ebay used which is a great and packable tent. However, the comments above are very true, in that my buddy got a tent from Cabelas that had almost all of the features of my much more expensive tent at 1/3 the cost.
My only additional comment is to imagine yourself in a steady downpour for several days when making your choice, as they are all great in sunny and dry weather; it's when the rain is relentless that the better tents really shine.
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Old 06-13-2012, 05:38 PM   #19
_cy_
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from this list: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/tents~d~228/

sierra designs, marmot and montainsmith are considered to offer bleeding edge designs and charge prices accordingly. prices are so high, only time I'd consider purchasing these brands if when they are on closeout.

right or wrong, have always consider Kelty tents to be mid range.

Really impressed with ALPS Engineering tents. don't be deceived by the low prices you see on ALPS tents. they offer quality almost on par with Sierra design and Marmot tents. ALPS offers very light/compact/stable designs.

note most all tent mfg have offered low end tents at some point. Sierra Designs have sold some pretty low end tents diluting their good name.

tent design is what decides if tent will survive say 100+ mph winds. NOT the price one pays. however odds go up when you pay more. but not always.

case in point... Freewheel is a 500 mile bike ride that goes across Oklahoma. this part of the country didn't get it's nickname of Tornado ally for nothing!

during Freewheel about 2,000 cyclist camps out most time in high school football fields. one year we we all camped out when a Tornado touched down next to the camp ground!!!!

naturally tornado sirens were going off .. the entire camp was evacuated to the school gymnasium. We elected to stay inside our Sierra Designs Stretch Prelude. We had camped out in 90+ mph winds before and tent was guided down solid.

the next morning the entire tent camp was flatten! hundreds of tents collapsed!
our Sierra Designs Stretch Prelude made it just fine. along with a tiny handful of other tents were still standing.

that's when I decided to take a unofficial tent survey.... besides the tiny handful of high end four season tents like Stretch Prelude, that survived.

the surprise of the day was the Walmart Free Standing 3 man Dome tents that survived the storm. yes the el cheapo dome tents sold at Walmart survived those 100+ mph winds. the one's with fiberglass poles and tarp floors everyone laughs at. KEY to stability was the dome design with two long poles that cross each other with an outside fly.

design was very close to freestanding Marmont tent below, except with cheap heavy materials.
free standing dome tents are inherently more stable, easier to setup and have more headroom.

almost forgot about the port-a-potty story... when the tornado touched down... someone was inside one of about 10 portapotty in a row ... imagine being stuck inside a row of upsidedown portapotties for several hours. until some folks heard him screaming and got him out.... oooOOOuuuueeee....


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Old 06-13-2012, 05:57 PM   #20
Wuwei
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Not specific to any tent, but watch out for sizing on 2-man tents as they can be very cramped for 2 real people. I was looking at an ultralight 2-man the other day and something didn't look right to me, so I compared the floor area and it was the exact same as the same company's 1-man heavier tent! The width was something like 32 inches, which might be OK for some, but it wasn't my idea of "2-man."
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:02 PM   #21
VStromTom
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One does NOT have to spend $300-400+ on a tent to get something that will last, be dry, easy to set up, and small enough to pack well on a bike. Don't drink that kool-aid. Shop closeouts, shop www.TheFind.com, Amazon, etc. Suggest using a blanket on your living room floor folded to the dimensions of what you are considering for a 2 up tent. Lay down on it with your sleeping bag, next to your bunk mate. You will get a decent idea of footprint and fit for 2 people. Works for me. Good luck.
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:24 PM   #22
wee-twin
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MSR Hubba Hubba, nice vestibules, near vertical walls, poles are short so easy to store, great ventilation. A few years ago backpacker magazine gave it their gear award and since then MSR has made some minor tweaks to make it even better.

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Old 06-17-2012, 02:42 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by wee-twin View Post
MSR Hubba Hubba
Too small for two people with motorcycle gear. It is already small for two people without the heavy gear when we are hiking. Get a Mutha Hubba for two people with bike gear if it needs to be a MSR.
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:50 PM   #24
Gale B.T.
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Originally Posted by Okie Preacher View Post
http://redverz.com/tents.html

Great tent. Great people to work with.
TOtally agree with Okie!!
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:40 PM   #25
Bigger Al
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For 2up camping I have a REI Taj 3 (on sale at REI for $230) HERE. Great space and features at a super price.



My wife and I have had the REI Taj III for almost 7 years, and it's been one of our very best investments. It's kept us dry in some biblical downpours, held strong in 60-MPH sustained Death Valley winds, and still looks nearly new to this day. We average 30-40 nights per year in this tent, and it's large interior space was one of the big selling points. The setup can be a bit fussy the first few times, but it doesn't take long to get the drill memorized.
It's not the smallest tent when packed, but the size is very managable and the plush comfort and well-thought-out design make it a great buy.

Good luck with your choice!
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Old 06-18-2012, 03:55 AM   #26
2Vulcans OP
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Question porch

The problem is that I really like the idea of a spacious porch for both storing and may be cooking in rainy conditions (half in, half out). Hilleberg makes some really nice ones (even if expensives) but all of them are basically on the ground.
I now found the Etesian 2 from Wild Country where the porch is actually insulated but it can also unzip to put dirty boots. I just don't really like the description since it is classified as "weekend tent".
Any opinion on this? or others similar?
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Old 06-18-2012, 04:08 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by 2Vulcans View Post
The problem is that I really like the idea of a spacious porch for both storing and may be cooking in rainy conditions (half in, half out). Hilleberg makes some really nice ones (even if expensives) but all of them are basically on the ground
I have a footprint for my Keron 3 pretty much for that reason and to protect the inner tent floor. If desired the footprint can stay attached when packing the tent, though I always take the inner tent our and just hook it in when setting it up to keep it dry and clean and to pack things in two small bags instead of one big bag.

I think I said this before: if I had the chance of buying a tent again, I'd get the Tarra just because it needs less tension on the stakes to set up. No big deal so far, our Keron 3 is cavernous, packs to about the same size and weight as the Tarra, is about as stable if set up properly, and I have a footprint for it. Perfect tent. It's more that we go hiking in really rocky, hard terrain and there we prefer a self supporting tent over more space. On the bike I don't care, can always decide to go a bit further to find a proper spot. On foot, that's much harder.

If somebody wants to swap (Tarra to Keron), possibly with money compensation from my side, I might do it. Good way of getting a Keron 3 (which has been used only a few times after I sold my Nammatj 2GT that I was using in Europe) ...
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Old 06-20-2012, 10:48 PM   #28
kevinj
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I swear by Exped tents. It's an Austrian company (or maybe Swiss - no, I think Austrian). In the U.S. you can buy them through Outdoor Research. As the name suggests, it's expedition gear. Won't break down on you when you need it. Takes any kind of weather. Company stands behind their product (I've gotten free replacement parts on products I've owned and used for 6 years).

They have 1-4 person tents, 3-4 season. Also sell some of the best sleeping mats you can buy; sleeping bags ; etc.

Count on spending $300-600 for a tent.


Enjoy your trip!
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Old 06-21-2012, 07:52 PM   #29
drbike
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I use my gear (a lot) for my money the Hilleberg stuff is great. I use a Nallo 3 and have been super happy with it. Our Canadian co-op MEC makes good stuff, sort of like REI and the Nallo has outlasted 3 of their tents (the kids tents). After using my tent for 10 months over 5 years I needed new poles no problems and dam if they even knew what tent I had from the original sale.
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Old 06-22-2012, 12:27 PM   #30
kevinj
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A few more thoughts :


* get a free-standing tent, i.e. one that will hold its shape without any stakes in the ground. So much easier to set up and find the exact right spot.

* if you want to stay dry : get a tent where you can leave the inner tent attached to the rainfly; or where you can first set up and stake the rainfly, and then clip in the inner tent. If you have to set up (poles, stakes) the inner tent first and then add the rainfly, you will end up with a wet tent some days. I don't understand why so many tents still follow that flawed design...

* if you're sharing the tent, get one with 2 doors. It will make your life easier :).

* if you don't plan on carrying it on your back, forget about ultralight and go for spacious (and sturdy) instead.


Last of all ... Practice setting up in the back yard at least once before your trip! I've had to figure out how to set up a new tent in the dark before, and it does make it more of an adventure :).
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