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Old 06-27-2012, 08:19 PM   #106
Kamloopsrider
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Originally Posted by vortexau View Post
Blighty? 110 V?
Electrical wiring in the United Kingdom



It would appear that historical shortages of many timbers in the UK had more to do with the demands of maintaining the Royal Navy rather than just making campfires!
Thanks for that, in Canada we sometimes refer to England as Blighty. Usually when some pompous ass tries to explain to us that the U.K. does things properly and the rest of the planet doesn't. It was also good of you to remind us what a great sea power England was. If wooden ships make a comeback we are all up shit creek.
Rule Brittania!
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Old 06-28-2012, 01:05 AM   #107
willis 2000
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40 psi

The local Euro shop's mantra is 40psi tire pressure, front and rear. Tires last longer, they say. A better plan is start with the manufacturer's recommendation, adjust for optimum handling. A coupla psi (+-) makes a difference.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:32 AM   #108
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Oh let's see how about the part that if there is money in it they will build it.

The dumbsiders can spout all they want to but putting a flat surfaced tire on a vehicle that leans to turn is not a bright idea.

Yes I have ridden three bikes with car tires. NO I did not like it. Unlike some naysayers I personally do see a benefit for people riding big heavy mile eaters that stick mostly to the Super Slab. They do get better wear and on the slab there is little to no downside to the car tire being run.

To me that takes away too much of the reason I ride a motorcycle in the first place.

The litigation that would follow a tire manufacturer building flat tires for bikes would take all the profit out of building them. That is why they do not do it.

Vehicles that lean to turn work best on rounded tires. It really is that simple.

A dumbsider will never admit to that. While it IS because of money it IS NOT for the reason he states.
While litigation would be a factor to consider, I propose that there wouldn't be any profit for them even IF they never got sued. The're in the business to make money. What's the point of throwing money at researching something that wouldn't make them any?

You're somewhat correct, that MOST vehicles that lean to turn work best on rounded tires. That's why MOST riders, even when faced with a manufacturer approved choice, would choose round-profile motorcycle tires.

Nobody's suggesting that all motorcycles should have car tires, or that everyone should be using them.

Randyo made some great points in his post, that different tires have different advantages and disadvantages. Put a knobby on your dual-sport you've traded on-road traction away for off-road traction. Put a sticker tire on your sport bike, you've traded longevity away for better traction. Put a car tire on your motorcycle, you've traded a few handling differences for better traction and tire life.

If you're trying to argue that nobody should ever run a car tire on any motorcycle, that makes as much sense as trying to argue that nobody should ever run knobbies on the street and everyone should use super-sticky performance tires on every bike, because that's how every motorcycle is going to work the best.

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:29 AM   #109
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Originally Posted by randyo View Post
and you know this cause you tried it ?
No, I actually read what some of you dark siders wrote in a few forums.

If you actually read what I have listed that I own and ride you wouldn't be a baiting anus. Still have problems with that 'vacuum braking' thing, huh?

By the way, when your CT bike can cut some laps on par with the same kind of bike with regular tires, (and I'm not talking about how you "feel" it works, I'm talking real world head to head comparisons) let me know.
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Old 06-28-2012, 08:03 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
No, I actually read what some of you dark siders wrote in a few forums.

If you actually read what I have listed that I own and ride you wouldn't be a baiting anus. Still have problems with that 'vacuum braking' thing, huh?

By the way, when your CT bike can cut some laps on par with the same kind of bike with regular tires, (and I'm not talking about how you "feel" it works, I'm talking real world head to head comparisons) let me know.
I would be 100% confident the car tire would meet that challenge. Pit two heavy cruisers (like my Vulcan 2000) on the same track, one with street MC tires, one with a rear mounted car tire, and I predict the car tire bike will be equally as fast as the MC tire shod identical machine.

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
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Old 06-28-2012, 09:44 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post

By the way, when your CT bike can cut some laps on par with the same kind of bike with regular tires, (and I'm not talking about how you "feel" it works, I'm talking real world head to head comparisons) let me know.
take identical bikes to the track with various tires, I would predict that the bike with supersport rubber would perform best, the one with the car tire would be in the middle of performance and the one with motorcyle knobbies would perform worse

all tires are a compromise and vacuum is still the major source of engine braking, when you roll off the thottle you are restricting the intake, not the exaust
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:04 PM   #112
SteelJM1
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Originally Posted by randyo View Post

all tires are a compromise and vacuum is still the major source of engine braking, when you roll off the thottle you are restricting the intake, not the exaust
wrong thread
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:18 PM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
snip

Myth: The window on the vertical cylinder bevel gear cover of a Ducati is to wait to see oil flow.

Fact: The window on the vertical cylinder bevel drive gear cover is there because it's cool to see the gears.
Watching a mate fire up his bevel, with gear cover window, it was the reverse of this.
As soon as the bike fired the window filled up with oil, all the way to the top, no gears visible, and didn't empty out until the oil got up to temperature, at which point my mate would ride away.
The return of cold, thick oil was the problem, not the supply.

Yes it is cool to watch the spiral bevel gears wizzing around.

Only owned one bevel deadcsat, and wisely sold it on, call me a ludite if you want, but give me pushrods.
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Old 06-30-2012, 02:17 PM   #114
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Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
If it was actually pressurized at that plug it wouldn't seep when loosened, it would spray. Odds are you're talking about an oil return and it takes time for the head to fill with enough oil to seep out.
Nope. I took the plug out today to see what would happen. About 1 second at idle after firing, oil began to flow fairly copiously but not "spray". It did not come out in a jet. As I stated, the plug covers the end of the pressurised gallery that feeds the camshaft bearings. If it were a plug for a gravity return, it wouldn't be much of a guide to oil pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Now if your GPz is to be an example of anything, it would be that the time it takes oil to get to the head is inconsequencial. You can fire it up and ride off.
Sure it's inconsequential. Thought we were kind of agreed on that. But it's inconsequential because it happens fast enough in a healthy motor to ensure that oil reaches rubbing surfaces where it is needed before wear takes place. If it didn't, it would be of great consequence. And the reason that it is "fast enough" is because the function of oil flow is to ensure there is a film of oil present, not to keep surfaces apart by pressure itself. This is obvious from the operation of cam followers, which depend not on a pressurised supply but on some sort of splash lubrication. I.e. oil deposited on the cam keeps it and the follower apart - for at least one period of contact. If it is not replenished, then eventually it gets displaced completely and wear takes place between surfaces.
High oil pressure is not an absolute requirement for plain bearings; the cam bearings on older Laverdas run on about 8psi. A constant supply of clean oil is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
You can fire it up and ride off. Hell, you ran yours for several seconds with no oil pressure and it did another 90,000 miles. Since the oil pressure light is proof of oil pressure through out the engine, seems if it has gone out several seconds before you put the bike in gear and start out, oiling is sufficient.
Not quite what I said. I took care to wait until the oil pressure light went out before riding the bike. As you say, once the light has gone out it is reasonable to suppose oil pressure is sufficient. FWIW, the 900 Diversion has no oil pressure light, only one that warns of low oil level.
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:27 AM   #115
markk53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy-Gadget View Post
Watching a mate fire up his bevel, with gear cover window, it was the reverse of this.
As soon as the bike fired the window filled up with oil, all the way to the top, no gears visible, and didn't empty out until the oil got up to temperature, at which point my mate would ride away.
The return of cold, thick oil was the problem, not the supply.

Yes it is cool to watch the spiral bevel gears wizzing around.

Only owned one bevel deadcsat, and wisely sold it on, call me a ludite if you want, but give me pushrods.

Ludite.
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Ever get lost? You know, that good kind of lost - come to a dirt road intersection and you have no idea where you are or which way to turn? I like when that happens!

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95 KLX650C w/Vulcan piston bigbore, Now an 09 KLX250S, selling my 90 Zephyr 550
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:28 AM   #116
markk53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randyo View Post
take identical bikes to the track with various tires, I would predict that the bike with supersport rubber would perform best, the one with the car tire would be in the middle of performance and the one with motorcyle knobbies would perform worse

all tires are a compromise and vacuum is still the major source of engine braking, when you roll off the thottle you are restricting the intake, not the exaust

No kidding!

Oh, so you're saying the exhaust valve is a screen door.
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Ever get lost? You know, that good kind of lost - come to a dirt road intersection and you have no idea where you are or which way to turn? I like when that happens!

Mark - klx678
95 KLX650C w/Vulcan piston bigbore, Now an 09 KLX250S, selling my 90 Zephyr 550
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:35 AM   #117
markk53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orygunner View Post
I would be 100% confident the car tire would meet that challenge. Pit two heavy cruisers (like my Vulcan 2000) on the same track, one with street MC tires, one with a rear mounted car tire, and I predict the car tire bike will be equally as fast as the MC tire shod identical machine.

...Orygunner...
Try it on the Nighthawk.

Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe. Kind of puts the "gunner" part of your tag in context. With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...

Just teasin', I know what you're saying. That was actually to a Concours owner, where there would be major differences. But I'm not in disagreement that there are times and places where I can see the square tread style working good. Heck it works good for trials bikes in their applications as well.
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Ever get lost? You know, that good kind of lost - come to a dirt road intersection and you have no idea where you are or which way to turn? I like when that happens!

Mark - klx678
95 KLX650C w/Vulcan piston bigbore, Now an 09 KLX250S, selling my 90 Zephyr 550
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Old 07-02-2012, 12:13 PM   #118
Orygunner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe. Kind of puts the "gunner" part of your tag in context. With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
Love it... Just added that as part of my signature :)

In the bike's defense though, even with a MC tire, it's capable of turning around on a four lane road if the shoulders are wide enough.

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
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Old 07-04-2012, 07:41 AM   #119
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I just remember when they came out I was still selling part time. At 5'6" but with a relatively long inseam, I got on the thing and it was one serious mass object to stand up on its two tires from the sidestand! I'm betting the stability of the bike is on par with a barge, since it is a serious contender for "Land Barge of the Third Millenium" award... but we have to wait until 3000 to give the award. Kawasaki woulda had the Second Millenium award it if they'd built the bike in 99!

I'm thinking that has to be one stable ride on an open road and I kinda think the car tire on the back makes sense. Fact is the old Firestones and whatever that were run on the Harleys over the decades of the 30s through the 60s were very square tread designs. Kind of tells you they wouldn't get too good of wear out of any crowned more sporting motorcycle tire either. Thus my comments about the car tires in the right circumstances.

You know, the only real concern in my book is that at least Michelin claims there are some differences in bead design from the car to motorcycle tires. If I was to do the car tire I'd be looking at that for sure. But the facts are they do appear to seat and work on the bike rims, quite obviously. I'm wondering if it has to do with the actual rim diameter or bead depth. It would be interesting if one of you dark siders would do the measurements, maybe do the precision mold compound deal to make a bead cross section from a car rim and a bike rim to determine if there really is a difference of any consequence or that it is a white lie to try to get motorcyclists to not run car tires.

Ah well, may the wind be at your back and you break the wake of anyone crossing your path with the Vulcan 2000 land yacht without consequence.

You are a good sport, by the way.
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Ever get lost? You know, that good kind of lost - come to a dirt road intersection and you have no idea where you are or which way to turn? I like when that happens!

Mark - klx678
95 KLX650C w/Vulcan piston bigbore, Now an 09 KLX250S, selling my 90 Zephyr 550
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Old 07-04-2012, 10:09 PM   #120
helotaxi
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My dad has a 2004 and we have done 3 trips together. He's 6'7" and 320# and it fits him. After this summers trip in the Smokies his response was "apparently I don't know how to ride a motorcycle". I think that 99% was the 2-wheeled land yacht that he was riding. Great on the 4-lane; hammered dog shit in the twisties.
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