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Old 07-30-2012, 09:54 AM   #811
AK Oldman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnun View Post
Not sure if anyone has tried this. I bought a bike that had been sitting and it ran poorly (got a good price because of that). it would only run with the choke half on. with 4 carbs on the bike, I thought i'd take a chance and try to cheat. nothing to lose on this really. I pulled the fuel line off. I used seafoam in the spray can with the little straw. .....
Seafoam has long been used as a fuel system cleaner. Pour some in the gas tank and it works great cleaning carbs and fuel injectors while you ride/drive.
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Old 08-12-2012, 12:23 PM   #812
groundrules
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When splitting cases or pulling covers, I make a simple template by tracing that allows me to both keep track of the screws and remember what lengths go in which holes. Often there's along time span between disassembly and reconstruction, so this is works out nice, and I can just hang it on a wall hook. It also reminds me if any are missing or beat up, requiring replacement.

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Old 08-13-2012, 04:17 AM   #813
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groundrules View Post
When splitting cases or pulling covers, I make a simple template by tracing that allows me to both keep track of the screws and remember what lengths go in which holes. Often there's along time span between disassembly and reconstruction, so this is works out nice, and I can just hang it on a wall hook. It also reminds me if any are missing or beat up, requiring replacement.

That is a really great trick and one that I have seen done when I worked in shops. It is most useful when one has different length bolts. If they are all the same it is of less value.
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:08 AM   #814
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Originally Posted by Emoto View Post
That is a really great trick and one that I have seen done when I worked in shops. It is most useful when one has different length bolts. If they are all the same it is of less value.
My mentor always would take the new gasket and trace it onto the cardboard backer it was packaged against.

Instant template for the same game.
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:24 AM   #815
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I don't think this one has been mentioned before; please forgive if I missed it.

On bikes that have endless (no discernable master link) chains from the factory, I usually clean the side plate of one link with parts cleaner, and then put a nice big dab of a bright color (yellow, red) automotive paint from a paint pen or the like in the middle of the side plate.

This helps me to find a starting/ending point for chain maintenance items like cleaning and relubing. Counting links gets pretty old, pretty fast.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:44 AM   #816
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emoto View Post
That is a really great trick and one that I have seen done when I worked in shops. It is most useful when one has different length bolts. If they are all the same it is of less value.
I prefer putting things like head bolts, manifold bolts, rod and main bearing bolts etc, back in the same holes they came out of. So even though they are all the same length, a bolt template like this comes in very handy, been using them for over 45 years now.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:49 AM   #817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK Oldman View Post
I prefer putting things like head bolts, manifold bolts, rod and main bearing bolts etc, back in the same holes they came out of. So even though they are all the same length, a bolt template like this comes in very handy, been using them for over 45 years now.
I've gotten in the habit of putting the bolts back in the actual holes that they came out of when I can. I'm even less likely to lose them or get them mixed up that way.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:41 AM   #818
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I get old nail polishes in different colours to use to mark bolt heads that have been torqued on reassembly. With different colours I know if it is newly retorqued by looking. I never forget to tighten important stuff like brake parts etc.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:11 AM   #819
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Originally Posted by Spud99 View Post
I get old nail polishes in different colours to use to mark bolt heads that have been torqued on reassembly. With different colours I know if it is newly retorqued by looking. I never forget to tighten important stuff like brake parts etc.
You can get torque paint from an aircraft supply. It's a thick yellow lacquer that's painted on fasteners when they're torqued, and it will crack if the fastener is moved or loosens from vibration.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:19 AM   #820
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You can get torque paint
exactly, I can't imagine myself shopping for nail polish.
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Old 08-14-2012, 04:38 PM   #821
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Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
You can get torque paint from an aircraft supply. It's a thick yellow lacquer that's painted on fasteners when they're torqued, and it will crack if the fastener is moved or loosens from vibration.
It's called "witness paint" and the most common brand is "Torque Seal". If you can't find it locally, its readily available cheap on Ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2oz-Tube-F...item35be8892a0

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Old 08-14-2012, 05:18 PM   #822
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I rarely wash my bikes with water to keep corrosion down and to stop dirt, dust and the mud it creates from getting into moving parts. I do use break cleaner on anything I take apart instead to keep the dirt out of the parts I'm working on.

Throw away chain lube and use Tri-Flow instead. Chain lube is the cheapest oil they can throw in a can but Tri-Flow is a real high performance lubricant. Grainger sells 16oz spray cans. I use it on everything else that needs lube as well. It won't gunk.

If you don't want to risk dropping tiny washers and nuts then put a tiny Allen wrench over the studs and let the loose nuts and washers slide safely onto the Allen wrench as they come off. It works as well when installing them if you use the largest size that fits.

In the garage the moths are no match for a shop vac. Those bastards can fly into your ear and attempt to gnaw their way thru your ear drum. To get them out you sit still while shining a light in your ear. They see the light and crawl out. If you kill them with the break cleaner then plan a trip to the ER to have it dug out.
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Old 08-14-2012, 11:20 PM   #823
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumpalump View Post

In the garage the moths are no match for a shop vac. Those bastards can fly into your ear and attempt to gnaw their way thru your ear drum. To get them out you sit still while shining a light in your ear. They see the light and crawl out. If you kill them with the break cleaner then plan a trip to the ER to have it dug out.

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Old 08-15-2012, 02:26 PM   #824
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian™ View Post
I don't think this one has been mentioned before; please forgive if I missed it.

On bikes that have endless (no discernible master link) chains from the factory, I usually clean the side plate of one link with parts cleaner, and then put a nice big dab of a bright color (yellow, red) automotive paint from a paint pen or the like in the middle of the side plate.

This helps me to find a starting/ending point for chain maintenance items like cleaning and relubing. Counting links gets pretty old, pretty fast.
that's a better idea, I usually just keep one plate shiny clean,


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumpalump View Post
In the garage the moths are no match for a shop vac. Those bastards can fly into your ear and attempt to gnaw their way thru your ear drum. To get them out you sit still while shining a light in your ear. They see the light and crawl out. If you kill them with the break cleaner then plan a trip to the ER to have it dug out.
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:37 PM   #825
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I have not read through the entire 50 pages, sorry if this is a repeat.
To remove a centerstand from a bike, you will need to take off the centerstand spring. They are strong springs, and difficult to pull off. To easily remove, set the bike on the centerstand. The spring will be streched. Reach under the bike and insert 5 or 6 coins (nickels quarters , etc) in spaces where the spring has been streched. Then when you push the bike off the centerstand the spring will still be stretched, and should easily unhook from centerstand and frame.
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