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Old 09-13-2012, 09:24 AM   #16
Bronco638
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH
... Simple Green is almost as good, and much cheaper...
Be careful with Simple Green, it's not intended for alloy metals (it's on the label). You're better off using a basic car wash from Target or Walmart.
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:46 PM   #17
JerryH
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While it does say that, I have used it on all my bikes, and never had a problem. It is a very mild cleaner. Very few motorcycles actually have any exposed alloy parts. Virtually all the alloy parts are clear coated. And you don't need to leave it on very long. Simple Green is an emulsifying cleaner that does it's job very quickly. It's best at getting oily dirt out of cracks and crevices that you can't get to. Spray some Simple Green in there, and hit it with a blast of water (from a garden hose nozzle, NOT a pressure washer, and it will usually come right out. It's a lot milder than engine degreasers like Gunk, which will definitely dry out both paint and clear coat, and in my case, even removed some paint.
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Old 09-13-2012, 04:58 PM   #18
Mikegigabyte
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Location: San Diego
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only time water ever hits my bikes is if I took them on dirt roads

all other cleanings is with sc1 spray
its like a silicon spray smells like cherries

makes all rubber parts black and glossy and plastic shiny
been using that for years on a bunch of bikes even ones that are over 30 years old
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:09 PM   #19
tcourdin
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Weird, I've been using S100 and Hondabrite for probably 20 years, its the best cycle cleaner I've used. I'm not sure what happened to you, thats a bummer.
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Old 09-14-2012, 12:58 PM   #20
JerryH
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I don't ride street bikes off road. I have an XT225, which is primarily used off road/on dirt roads, and it almost never gets washed. I believe constant washing does more damage than leaving it dirty, except for the chain and air filter.

Here in AZ, the biggest problem with keeping streetbikes clean is dust. Even parked in a garage and not ridden, dust settles all over them. My method of dealing with that is to use a 2 gallon pump up garden sprayer (bought for the purpose and never had anything else in it) filling it with distilled water, and using it to rinse the loose dust off. On a really nice streetbike, I never touch the paint with any kind of rag or cloth until it has been thoroughly washed and rinsed with a soft bristled paint brush. Trying to wipe dirt off paint with a rag will scratch the paint, even if you use a spray on cleaner, because you have dirt between the rag and the paint.

Where I live we have what we call "salt water" that comes out of the faucet. It is very acidic, and will leave LOTS of spots, which will eventually etch the paint. Even after washing a bike with soap/cleaner, I spray it down with distilled water to rinse the salt water off, especially in tight places. If you don't get it out of there, it will start corrosion. I also use a shop vac with a blower. I will eventually get a compressor, so I can use compressed air, but don't have one yet.


As far as what to use to dry a bike after actually washing it, I have found VIVA paper towels to be perfect. They do not scratch like other paper towels, and can be wadded up or twisted up to get into some pretty tiny places to get the water out. I usually use a whole roll of them while drying and detailing a bike.
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