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Old 09-18-2012, 11:30 PM   #3016
Sock Monkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtymartini View Post
Did you have an issues with cables when installing the Rox risers? I just ordered some risers from Twisted Throttle but I might return them for the Rox risers. Do you have a part number for them?
With the Stelvio, if you add bar risers of any kind you will have to move the 2 throttle cables and front brake line behind the top triple clamp or they will bind at full lock. The other cables/wires can stay where they are.

It's a relatively easy process. Just remove 3 bolts (2 top pinch bolts and steering stem bolt), slide the top clamp up, slip the offending cables behind the clamp, slide the clamp back into place and tighten all bolts to spec. Be warned however that my 2 top clamp pinch bolts were VERY hard to loosen (had to beat on an Allen wrench with a hammer to get them to budge). The leading theory is dissimilar metals are not playing well with each other, so when you reinstall them, use a bit of anti-seize and reduce torque by 30%. Oh, and the stem hex bolt is 14mm....not your average size, and is torqued to 100Nm, so have the big wrench handy.

Re. part numbers, I bought the anti-vibe risers, part no. 1R-AV2PP. The non-anti-vibe risers will also work and save you some coin, part no. 1R-P2PP. Frankly, I don't know that the anti-vibe version makes much difference, but I thought I'd give them a try. This is the second set of Rox risers I've used on my bikes, and recommend them. They are super easy to install, and allow for nearly endless combinations of rise/pull back for a perfect fit.

-SM
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Old 09-18-2012, 11:59 PM   #3017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham View Post

I did want to warn everyone that comparing weights of these lithe bikes is a bit like comparing towing capacities of pickups....they lie.

BMW doesn't include their wheels (?), any of their accessories, and then dare to call it a "wet" weight. Guzi just lays it all out there just like Honda.

.
The weight difference has been a concern for me - where did you find the info on BMW not including wheel weights? What do you think the real weight difference is?

thanks,
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Old 09-19-2012, 04:21 AM   #3018
dirtymartini
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sock Monkey View Post
With the Stelvio, if you add bar risers of any kind you will have to move the 2 throttle cables and front brake line behind the top triple clamp or they will bind at full lock. The other cables/wires can stay where they are.

It's a relatively easy process. Just remove 3 bolts (2 top pinch bolts and steering stem bolt), slide the top clamp up, slip the offending cables behind the clamp, slide the clamp back into place and tighten all bolts to spec. Be warned however that my 2 top clamp pinch bolts were VERY hard to loosen (had to beat on an Allen wrench with a hammer to get them to budge). The leading theory is dissimilar metals are not playing well with each other, so when you reinstall them, use a bit of anti-seize and reduce torque by 30%. Oh, and the stem hex bolt is 14mm....not your average size, and is torqued to 100Nm, so have the big wrench handy.

Re. part numbers, I bought the anti-vibe risers, part no. 1R-AV2PP. The non-anti-vibe risers will also work and save you some coin, part no. 1R-P2PP. Frankly, I don't know that the anti-vibe version makes much difference, but I thought I'd give them a try. This is the second set of Rox risers I've used on my bikes, and recommend them. They are super easy to install, and allow for nearly endless combinations of rise/pull back for a perfect fit.

-SM
Thanks for the info SM, I will look up the Rox Risers tonight when I get home...
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:44 AM   #3019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thinc2 View Post
The weight difference has been a concern for me - where did you find the info on BMW not including wheel weights? What do you think the real weight difference is?

thanks,

Motorcycle Consumer News has weighed a few recently and doesn't take ads.

Their findings (full tank):

Stelvio NTX: 666 lbs

R1200GS: 532 lbs

Multistrada 1200S Sport: 504 lbs


Of course, the weights include standard kit. So the Stelvio includes an extra 12 Litres of fuel, bigger fuel tank, alum panniers and mounts, crash bars, light bars, extra lights, etc.

Still, it is weighty. Hope it adds up to strength. When you look at that frame - made from heavy gauge tubing - it's just possible.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:57 AM   #3020
James Adams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
Motorcycle Consumer News has weighed a few recently and doesn't take ads.

Their findings (full tank):

Stelvio NTX: 666 lbs

R1200GS: 532 lbs

Multistrada 1200S Sport: 504 lbs


Of course, the weights include standard kit. So the Stelvio includes an extra 12 Litres of fuel, bigger fuel tank, alum panniers and mounts, crash bars, light bars, extra lights, etc.

Still, it is weighty. Hope it adds up to strength. When you look at that frame - made from heavy gauge tubing - it's just possible.
Have they weighed a GSA recently?
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Old 09-19-2012, 10:24 AM   #3021
WitchCityBallabio
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Weight is a sign of reliability...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHFffPZahLY
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Old 09-19-2012, 11:03 AM   #3022
Paulvt1
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One thing that i found in the multitude of bikes i've rode this year is that the relentless quest for more and more BHP in the Adv sector doesn't translate to automatic riding satisfaction. My S10 is putting out 100 bhp at the rear wheel now - after a remap i should add - and i love it's nature now. It's rev ceiling is about 7000 rpm. I love using the low end and mid range to make progress.
I should imagine that the Stelvio is cut from the same cloth.
I do remember riding one a few years ago and finding it a thoroughly enjoyable bike.
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:57 PM   #3023
Sock Monkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulvt1 View Post
One thing that i found in the multitude of bikes i've rode this year is that the relentless quest for more and more BHP in the Adv sector doesn't translate to automatic riding satisfaction. My S10 is putting out 100 bhp at the rear wheel now - after a remap i should add - and i love it's nature now. It's rev ceiling is about 7000 rpm. I love using the low end and mid range to make progress.
I should imagine that the Stelvio is cut from the same cloth.
I do remember riding one a few years ago and finding it a thoroughly enjoyable bike.
Indeed, when I test rode the S10 before purchasing the Stelvio, I was very pleasantly surprised by the character of the S10 motor. 100HP is MORE than enough for hauling you, the Missus, and as much other crap as you can stack on the bike a loooong way in comfort. I did the 150HP Adv bike thing.....FUN, but not necessary, and not with the same low-end "umph" you need for laying down tractable power on those "oh SH*T" sections of trail.

I just saw the specs for the new '13 KTM 1190....145HP, with the engine being a "detuned" RC8 mill. Very Ducati'ish, and IMO the absolute worst powerplant they could have put in it. Taking a road-racing engine and "tuning it for torque" will get you a fantastic, flexible, ROAD-biased bike, but there's already a pot-load of those (Ducati, Honda, Triumph, etc). KTM should have stuck to their roots and made a better DIRT-biased bike and continued to stomp everyone off-tarmac. Now, they'll be just like all the rest.....

-SM
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Old 09-19-2012, 07:42 PM   #3024
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blakebird View Post
the crankpin stagger puts the left cylinder closer to your leg than the right....so the folks that have heat issues notice the left side more.

the stock exhaust's catalytic converter is pretty close to the pillion's left leg, and it does hold significant heat... I was glad to get rid of that before the better half and I took our long trip.
Yep...understand that. I just never feel heat on my left knee or upper shin, even when at a dead stop in hot weather. When I feel the heat, I feel it on the back of my thigh or on my calf, which is why I tend to think it's related more to exhaust temperature and how the pipes are routed than the left cylinder being closer to the rider than the right.

But that's just my opinion, and we all have LOTS of those!
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:46 PM   #3025
Ham
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I guarantee you a GS adventure does not weigh that little...on their very own tag they say wet weight does not include accessories. Sorry. I have sat on and rode both. Absolutely no way there is a 100 lb difference. No way. And the Guzzi carries it lower down. But really...what is the difference anyway. Once you are over 350 lbs you are screwed anyway...so balance and handling, low end speed without stalling, able to put your feet down solidly, smooth onset of power with clutch release, and tires...these things matter. Not absolute weight.
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Old 09-20-2012, 10:24 AM   #3026
Sock Monkey
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1000 rpm = 6 mpg (US)

Since all the cool kids were reporting their low fuel light coming on at 250-260 miles and filling up with a measly 6 gallons, and I was more like 220 miles and 7 gallons , I thought I'd try a little experiment. As much as it pained me, I ran a tank of fuel through the bike averaging 4-4.5k rpm vs. my usual 5-5.5k rpm (i.e. where all the FUN begins ). Normally, my avg. mpg (US) is right around 33 (33.2 to be exact). By dropping the avg revs down by 1k, I got 39.2mpg. Note that my commute is 60 miles round trip on roads ranging from 25mph to 80mph + highway blasting, so that 39.2 could be significantly improved upon at a constant speed/rpm.

So....what did I learn? 40mpg + should be easy to achieve whilst touring at a constant 70-75mph. That's 4-4.5k rpm in 6th gear. Also, I'll rarely see 40mpg + because the bike is sooooo much more fun to ride above 5k rpm.

-SM
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Old 09-20-2012, 03:58 PM   #3027
THE BONE SHAKER
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sock Monkey View Post
With the Stelvio, if you add bar risers of any kind you will have to move the 2 throttle cables and front brake line behind the top triple clamp or they will bind at full lock. The other cables/wires can stay where they are.

It's a relatively easy process. Just remove 3 bolts (2 top pinch bolts and steering stem bolt), slide the top clamp up, slip the offending cables behind the clamp, slide the clamp back into place and tighten all bolts to spec. Be warned however that my 2 top clamp pinch bolts were VERY hard to loosen (had to beat on an Allen wrench with a hammer to get them to budge). The leading theory is dissimilar metals are not playing well with each other, so when you reinstall them, use a bit of anti-seize and reduce torque by 30%. Oh, and the stem hex bolt is 14mm....not your average size, and is torqued to 100Nm, so have the big wrench handy.

Re. part numbers, I bought the anti-vibe risers, part no. 1R-AV2PP. The non-anti-vibe risers will also work and save you some coin, part no. 1R-P2PP. Frankly, I don't know that the anti-vibe version makes much difference, but I thought I'd give them a try. This is the second set of Rox risers I've used on my bikes, and recommend them. They are super easy to install, and allow for nearly endless combinations of rise/pull back for a perfect fit.

-SM
I moved my cables but un did them from the throttle grip and threaded them through to the rear of the triple clamp. It seemed easier than taking the triple clamp off. I had my bar risers installed within quarter of an hour. The Rox risers are not a perfect fit in my original bar clamps but they are held tight so left it at that.
Cheers
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Old 09-20-2012, 04:07 PM   #3028
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham View Post
I guarantee you a GS adventure does not weigh that little...on their very own tag they say wet weight does not include accessories. Sorry. I have sat on and rode both. Absolutely no way there is a 100 lb difference. No way. And the Guzzi carries it lower down. But really...what is the difference anyway. Once you are over 350 lbs you are screwed anyway...so balance and handling, low end speed without stalling, able to put your feet down solidly, smooth onset of power with clutch release, and tires...these things matter. Not absolute weight.
That's the best said post on this thread. This is everything to rideability in all conditions. I have ridden 1200GSAs, KTM 990s, V-Strom 1000s and a Super Tenere' and found them all to be way more top heavy than my Stelvio NTX. And then I also found that I have more feed back from my front end, better damping then any off them and the easiest to hold a steady line when corner carving. Stelvios are awesome bikes. Nuff said. Cheers
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Old 09-20-2012, 05:47 PM   #3029
Moronic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham View Post
I guarantee you a GS adventure does not weigh that little...on their very own tag they say wet weight does not include accessories. Sorry. I have sat on and rode both. Absolutely no way there is a 100 lb difference. No way.

If you are referring to the figure I quoted from the Motorcycle Consumer News reports, you are quite right: that was for the small-tank R1200GS, without bags or engine bars etc, and not for the Adventure model.

Independent weight figures for the Adventure aren't so easy to come by. However, Motorcyclist online quotes 581 lbs for the 07 model.

However, just how wet that is I'm not sure. I am guessing it is without the aluminium bags. They also quote 631 lbs for the 05 R1200RT - a 50 lb difference - whereas BMW's own figures quote a difference of only 14 lbs for dry weight - and the GS Adventure has a bigger tank.

It is looking like a full-tank GS Adventure with alum bags and a full-tank Stelvio with bags might not be so far apart.

Interested to see if anybody can dig up something more accurate. I remember there were some home-measured weights quoted on the Super Tenere thread a while back, for a bunch of bikes (but maybe not a GS Adventure).
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:08 PM   #3030
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THE BONE SHAKER View Post
I moved my cables but un did them from the throttle grip and threaded them through to the rear of the triple clamp. It seemed easier than taking the triple clamp off. I had my bar risers installed within quarter of an hour. The Rox risers are not a perfect fit in my original bar clamps but they are held tight so left it at that.
Cheers
How did you move the front brake line?

The electrical bundles are all long enough, but the throttle cables and front brake line were not, at least not on my bike. I considered undoing the throttle cables, but I was too lazy to do a front brake bleed so I went the top-clamp-removal route.

Re. the ROX not being a "perfect fit", what doesn't fit???

-SM
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