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Old 10-03-2012, 06:45 AM   #16786
mikesova
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Serves him right for riding a chick bike.
Yep, should have went with a manly bike, like the FZ6. We don't need no steenkin' FULL fairing.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:00 AM   #16787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Serves him right for riding a chick bike.
How do you know definitively that this was not a chick?

Chaz Bono Perhaps?




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Old 10-03-2012, 08:03 AM   #16788
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ray h View Post
FAIL. Highbeams on during the day.
I've been told that apparently it blinds or confuses other road users.
I'm not really a high beam guy so that is odd. I wonder (and I totally understand what you are seeing), if it's some type of reflection bouncing back from my plastic guard? As bright as the low beam is, you'd think the high beam fixture would be fully filled with light. Either that or I just screwed up and hit my high beams.

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Old 10-03-2012, 08:28 AM   #16789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by two trackin fool View Post
GOD I love red heads
Especially on two wheels!
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:45 AM   #16790
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliken View Post
How do you know definitively that this was not a chick?

Chaz Bono Perhaps?




Needs a man-siere or is that a bro?
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Old 10-03-2012, 09:05 AM   #16791
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliken View Post
How do you know definitively that this was not a chick?

Chaz Bono Perhaps?




Needs a man-siere or is that a bro?
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Old 10-03-2012, 12:11 PM   #16792
Bill Harris
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Nice ride, decent gear ands he's haulin'...

I used to have a 350 Twin in the late 70's. Commute/city bike. Got stolen. :(

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Old 10-03-2012, 12:35 PM   #16793
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The sequence says it all.
1st Pic. I think I'd like to go off the road over there...
2nd : Yes, right there looks perfect. Nice & green, lush grass.
3rd.: The longer I stare at that grass, the more peaceful it seems!
4th: YES! Nice & soft...
5th: I think I'll just lay down here for awhile & relax.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Krang View Post

Well

s

h

i

t

Target fixation: Oh yeah, it's real.

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
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Old 10-03-2012, 12:35 PM   #16794
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
Nice ride, decent gear ands he's haulin'...

Didn't you see the # on the helmet, that is Rossi on Vacation!

He is test riding the new Yamaha, disguised like a Honda.
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Old 10-03-2012, 12:53 PM   #16795
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RidingDonkeys View Post
Probably not the right forum here, but I'll bring it up because this question has been nagging me.

I rode bicycles long before I touched a motorcycle. Ultralight road bicycles stop a lot faster than the rider on top of them. It takes very little pressure on the brakes to fully engage them. One finger will lock them if you aren't careful. At high speeds, I would often find myself reaching out with just my pinky to pull the brakes a little to slow down. Never, and I mean never, did I need more than a finger to get full stopping power, and never did my brake handles need to be pulled all the way back to the handlebars to be fully engaged.

Fast forward, and I'm learning to ride a motorcycle. I adopted the same mentality. None of the motorcycles I've owned in thirteen years or riding have ever needed more than a slight tug to engage the clutch or front brake, and none have ever had to be pulled back to the bars to be engaged. I finally took an MSF class and the instructors corrected me for this. I've now taken several more MSF classes, and all the instructors say the same, all four fingers should cover the handles. None, and I mean none, have ever been able to give me a reason why.

When I'm on my sidecar rigs, I'm constantly throwing my body off the tug to counterbalance the weight of the sidecar. Sometimes you need a little more grip on the bars to put yourself back in position, but still need to maintain some control of the clutch for an emergency scenario. The one finger approach works great.

On my hardtails and my cafe racer, keeping all four off the controls works just fine. I've never pinched a finger, had trouble engaging a brake or clutch, etc.

So, what is the importance of having all four fingers on the controls?
I've been asked "Why?" before by a student or two, and here's the reasons why we coach all fingers on the brake (Team Oregon, not MSF):

First is that while 1 or 2 fingers may do fine when performing regular braking, under hard braking the fingers not being used can get pinched under the brake lever, at best pinning the fingers, but at worst, preventing more front brake if more is needed.

The other reason is habit. If the rider only practices braking with two fingers, when it comes to an emergency, how many fingers are they going to use? They're either going to only use two like they've always practiced (which may not be enough strength or precise feel for proper maximum braking, or pin/pinch the other fingers), or they're going to reflexively grab with all their fingers, which they haven't practiced, and will have a tendency to over-brake.

It was slightly awkward when I coached one student to use all four fingers on the brake and he held up his right hand, squeezed two fingers of the glove to show they were empty and said "I lost two and a half fingers in an accident years ago." I replied, "Ok, just use all the fingers you have, then."

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...
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Old 10-03-2012, 01:36 PM   #16796
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orygunner View Post
I've been asked "Why?" before by a student or two, and here's the reasons why we coach all fingers on the brake (Team Oregon, not MSF):

First is that while 1 or 2 fingers may do fine when performing regular braking, under hard braking the fingers not being used can get pinched under the brake lever, at best pinning the fingers, but at worst, preventing more front brake if more is needed.
If you're riding a bike that requires 4 fingers to get maximum braking or has so much lever travel that it drops to the point where it pinches your fingers you need to service your brake system. With my calipers the widest part of my finger with race gauntlet gloves is 26mm...

Quote:
The other reason is habit. If the rider only practices braking with two fingers, when it comes to an emergency, how many fingers are they going to use? They're either going to only use two like they've always practiced (which may not be enough strength or precise feel for proper maximum braking, or pin/pinch the other fingers), or they're going to reflexively grab with all their fingers, which they haven't practiced, and will have a tendency to over-brake.
If they're covering the front brake with 1 to 2 fingers how are they going to suddenly add another 2 fingers to it?

By not covering the brakes they are adding about 0.186 to there brake reaction time (http://www.promocycle.com/documentat...valfrein_e.pdf) Meaning at 60 mph he's added 16ft to his stopping time (80mph = 21ft).

Why do almost all of the racers (off-road and street) brake with either 1 or 2 fingers (with a notable exception being Rossi) and many cover the lever full time.
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Old 10-03-2012, 02:00 PM   #16797
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On both bikes I currently ride, I can easily lock the front wheel with two fingers. I need the other two to operate the throttle to rev match during downshifts while braking for a corner. Brake application is almost instantaneous because the two fingers always rest on top of the brake lever.
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Old 10-03-2012, 02:46 PM   #16798
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
Nice ride, decent gear ands he's haulin'...

I used to have a 350 Twin in the late 70's. Commute/city bike. Got stolen. :(

Those CB350s are surprisingly good mountain road bikes. I have had the joy more than once to ride my '68 in the Blue Ridge and Smokies (but not on the Dragon--I hate crowds).

Cheers,

Mike
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Old 10-03-2012, 03:01 PM   #16799
Orygunner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
If you're riding a bike that requires 4 fingers to get maximum braking or has so much lever travel that it drops to the point where it pinches your fingers you need to service your brake system. With my calipers the widest part of my finger with race gauntlet gloves is 26mm...



If they're covering the front brake with 1 to 2 fingers how are they going to suddenly add another 2 fingers to it?

By not covering the brakes they are adding about 0.186 to there brake reaction time (http://www.promocycle.com/documentat...valfrein_e.pdf) Meaning at 60 mph he's added 16ft to his stopping time (80mph = 21ft).

Why do almost all of the racers (off-road and street) brake with either 1 or 2 fingers (with a notable exception being Rossi) and many cover the lever full time.
We have a variety of 125 - 250 cc training bikes, and do service them regularly. Some bikes (specifically Suzuki DR 250s) inherently have very spongy brakes that require a lot of force (ALL fingers) to stop quickly. Others only have a fraction of an inch between the lever and the handgrip under maximum braking, by design, with stock levers.

Edit: Actually, on top of that, are all motorcycle riders going to make sure their levers are adjusted so that they can brake hard with 2 fingers and not pinch/crush the rest? As I said, we are teaching to a common denominator. Use all 4 fingers for braking, all the time eliminates that problem for everybody.

Also consider who we are teaching - new, inexperienced riders. We coach them to cover their clutch at all times on the range (at least for the first day of training), and NOT to cover the brake at any time on the range - covering the brakes is mentioned in the classroom for hazardous situations on the street where they would want to reduce their reaction time, but we're not surprising them on the range, and the risk of accidentally or mistakenly applying front brake at the wrong time is a considerable safety issue.

The initial question was concerning what was taught in a basic riding class. Racing techniques usually are for more experienced riders.

I personally use all fingers for most braking, but sometimes just use two depending on what I'm doing (slow speed manuvers or blipping the throttle while braking & downshifting). Sometimes I even just use one brake or the other.

...Orygunner...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
Actually I'm not sure the Vulcan qualifies as a bike... two wheeled tank, maybe....With the 2000's clearance I'm not sure the Vulcan could make it around the tightest curves on a track without having to stop and back up...

Orygunner screwed with this post 10-03-2012 at 03:09 PM
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Old 10-03-2012, 03:12 PM   #16800
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 100mpg View Post
"Do I look like I'm smiling?"
Nope, but his passenger sure looks surprised!
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