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Old 10-03-2012, 06:42 PM   #31
ThatGuy
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+ million on staying off shiny things, specially the traffic paint. DO NOT stop on the those big painted arrows on the road.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:20 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opmike View Post
Yes, to a point. However, there IS a significant difference in the painted lines in my town, and they often paint GIANT arrows right at the point where you'll be tipping the bike in to turn. I'm talking slick to the point that pedestrians crossing over them have slipped and you don't want to put your foot down on them. Also, there will be sections (especially in construction zones) where that red clay is spread all out over the roads. In the dry, it's not so bad but in the wet, that stuff turns slick as snot. This holds true regardless of whatever tire you feel is the best and greatest. I'm a smooth rider regardless of the weather, but I do adjust my riding style a bit to suit the wet...there's no reason not to and it's not some admission of over-aggressiveness if you do.

In my experience, you have a helluva more traction than you think at some points, and a helluva lot less traction than you think at other points. Best to use good judgment...like with everything we do on a bike.

I agree with that riding in the rain 90% of the time you've got more traction than you think you should, but sometimes you've got allot less than you did 5 feet ago and if it's just started raining pay lots of care approaching stop lights and intersections until it's had time to wash some some of the oil away.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:28 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by viverrid View Post
Hazard lights? What hazard lights? We don't all ride BMWs.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:28 PM   #34
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All good advice noted above.

Don't forget tires, good tires make a huge difference too.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:37 PM   #35
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Lots of good advice here. In addition, though, I'd like to say that it helps to relax and not get too uptight about it all. Riding in the rain takes a little practice and technique adjustment (much like carrying a passenger does), but it's not ridiculously dangerous.

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Old 10-03-2012, 07:39 PM   #36
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I ride pretty much every day, rain or not.

With modern tires traction is pretty good generally, yes I slow down, yes I'm gentle on the throttle and brakes, but even slick spots aren't an automatic crash, just stay balanced and don't let the bike lie down.

Metal is deadly. Painted lines, meh, NOTHING on a wet man-hole cover or railway lines.

The bike probably stops pretty good, the vehicle behind you , probably not so good. Leave more space - being hit from behind probably hurts less than being squished between two cars and secondly if you hear the dreaded "screech" from behind it'll give you more room to do a high speed lane split.

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Old 10-03-2012, 08:14 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laconic View Post
Get a pinlock faceshield. Being able to see makes riding in the rain fun.

I only got one 6 months ago; some of the best money I've ever spent.
^THIS^
I like to "soften" up my suspension. I'll take sum pre-load, compression, 'n rebound out to lower the bike, and make it more forgiving.
Make sure you have sum tread on yer Tyres.
Also RELAX! It can be hard when you're wet & cold, 'n yer tires are slip'in, but you gotta relax and let the bike do it's thang.
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:26 PM   #38
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Has anyone ever hydroplaned on a MC?

I've ridden awful fast in A LOT of "REAL" heavy rain (referred to as Toad Stranglers here in Floriduh) and I don't think I have ever felt that happen.
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:29 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by rivercreep View Post
5. Use the tire footprints from cars in front of you (where their tires have already displaced water) to your advantage to resist hydroplaning.

.

I live by that.. and do it almost daily!
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:42 AM   #40
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Watch out for wet leaves, especially when cornering but even when braking in a straight line.............I kinda forgot about that last night.
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:08 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by STUFF2C View Post
Has anyone ever hydroplaned on a MC?

I've ridden awful fast in A LOT of "REAL" heavy rain (referred to as Toad Stranglers here in Floriduh) and I don't think I have ever felt that happen.
Go faster and find a deeper puddle... I hit ~5" deep puddle at the edge of a highway once at probably 80ish. The bike didn't feel connected to the pavement and the motor revved up but it didn't really do anything whacky just sorta floated straight through. I did slow down some though...
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:32 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by STUFF2C View Post
Not the best advise... saw the aftermath of two HD riders that got smashed (thnakfully they were ok ish when they were hauled away), parked under an overpass in a downpour. I was told the "driver" didn't see them as she was pulling under the overpass.
I try to avoid this now and just keep on rolling much more aware of my surroundings. In Floriduh it's usually clear in a few miles anyway.
Fair point, but again, it's a question of risk: where are you most vulnerable?

Personally, I avoid the overpasses and just get off the highway and find a covered gas station. But if the squall is bad enough, getting off the road is the #1 consideration.
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:41 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STUFF2C View Post
Has anyone ever hydroplaned on a MC?

I've ridden awful fast in A LOT of "REAL" heavy rain (referred to as Toad Stranglers here in Floriduh) and I don't think I have ever felt that happen.
Oh yeah! Which leads me to my one piece of advice, after it rains, even if the road is dry, watch out for tunnels! It can still be very wet in the tunnels and the sudden transition between dry and wet can catch you by surprise and potentially ruin your day. I speak from experience, the closest call of my life came from just that happening. I headed into a tunnel at dry road speeds to find a very wet road, I hydroplaned and came very very close to ending up in the oncoming lane. Lesson learned!
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:58 AM   #44
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I put a set of Michelin Pilot Road 3s on the Kawasaki this year, and they are the best rain tires I've ever had. They have extensive siping, far more than the PR 2s do, and they feel very stable and solid in the wet.
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Old 10-04-2012, 08:08 AM   #45
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by d.burbach View Post
Oh yeah! Which leads me to my one piece of advice, after it rains, even if the road is dry, watch out for tunnels! It can still be very wet in the tunnels and the sudden transition between dry and wet can catch you by surprise and potentially ruin your day. I speak from experience, the closest call of my life came from just that happening. I headed into a tunnel at dry road speeds to find a very wet road, I hydroplaned and came very very close to ending up in the oncoming lane. Lesson learned!
There is a semantic difference between hydroplaning and sliding... As I understand it, hydroplaning means your tire sort of floats on the water, which takes wide tires and not a lot of weight--ie low PSI at the contact patch; most mc tires have such a small contact patch, I'll wager you have better chances of getting struck by lightning than hydroplaning on the street...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquaplaning
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