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Old 10-03-2012, 11:01 AM   #1
whitham_wannabe OP
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Meet in the middle - North California, Southern Oregon and a tiny chunk of Nevada.

Everyone who has been keenly following the adventures of Twisted Melon Racing’s attempts at adventure touring (you were, weren’t you?) will of course remember our failed attempt to do the Usal Road on our original ADV foray. No experience, limited time, it was raining, we were on street tires, blinker fluid was running low … we had all the excuses in the world, and chickened out like Mike the headless chicken.

Our plans for 2012, though much delayed, were quite simple … Chris lives in San Diego, I live in Everett, just north of Seattle. The half way point, 700 miles for each of us, lies right next to the Lost Coast and the Usal Road. Time to vindicate ourselves. We picked the Standish Hickey State Park, and agreed to meet there on Saturday evening.

My ride for the week would be my trusty F800GS, hardly modified at all from the first trip. For Chris, however, it was all change. After laboring along with an R1150GS for a few years, and dealing with the issues that riding this colossus off road presented (see here, here, here and here, for example) had seen the light when he borrowed my girlfriend’s DRZ last summer in a trip up to the PNW. So impressed was he that he replicated Sunny’s bike, almost down to the last detail.

Don’t believe me? Here he is on Sunny’s bike …



And here he is on his own ….



Creepy, huh?

Anyway, are we sitting comfortably? Then lets begin. …
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Old 10-03-2012, 11:20 AM   #2
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Let's see where this goes
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Old 10-03-2012, 04:08 PM   #3
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Our Usal trip failed too. Can't wait to see your do-over!
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:07 PM   #4
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Wink OK, as I left first ...

OK, so I'd better kick this off as I left first....

First off, Ropey tells the truth. We'd done a few trips already but truth be told I really struggled with the GS. I'm a bit of a novice off road so an 1150 Boxer perhaps was not the wisest choice. But a quick (1400 mile) trip on Sunny's DRZ made me a firm believer in the little Suzy single (although the stock seat clearly had to go). So my trip prep started some months previous with this ...


And then some Dirt Wheels ...



And then Thumpertalk case savers, Seat Concepts seat (awesome), Clarke gas tank, TCI Denali luggage, TKC80's, Edge tail light, Moose hand guards and a tank bag




I decided that I'd take 2 days getting upto the meeting point of Standish-Hickey ... there's no rush after all. The bike had been packed for best part of the week so I figured I'd get up at the crack of a sparrows fart on Friday morning and go. What actually happened was the snooze button took some abuse and I finally rolled out at 7:30.



I settled in to a nice pace of about 65mph ... tunes in the lid ... quite happy. Up the I5 past Bakersfield and cut over on the 46 past James Dean's crash site and memorial (didn't stop ... figured he was beyond help) and picked up the 101.
Now, the plan was to find somewhere quite early to camp so I headed over to the 1 and started looking for places to set up just after monterey ... Nope ... all booked. OK .. I'll carry on unto Half Moon Bay ... Nope ... in fact, nothing.

Bugger.

At this point I was well into the ride and figured I'd keep going and see what happened. HIt the Golden gate bridge at dusk ..



...and had I remembered that the shuttle was due to fly over that day I'd have left earlier!

Carried on up the 101 .... and on ... and on .... until by the time I hit Ukiah I was pretty much done. I got a motel room (much to ropers disgust) and was just about to unload the bike when a bunch of kids disappeared into next door with a few crates of beer ... so I cancelled the room and moved up a couple of exits and got another one. Nice shower, couple of beers, Bed.

In the morning I woke to see a text message that Roper was now underway so as I was only about 70 miles away I meandered about for a bit and got on the road about 9-10ish and arrived at Standish-Hickey around midday. Chucked up the test


Ensured adequate supplies were in



And then killed a few hours at the swimming hole



Until Roper showed up early evening...



Complete with bike trouble .....
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Old 10-04-2012, 07:27 AM   #5
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Long Way Down.




With Chris on his way, Friday morning I woke up with a stinking head cold. Drugs, drugs, I need drugs man!

With the big cubes of the 800 available to me, I elected to have an extra comfortable night at home and burn the 700 miles down to NorCal in a day. Saturday morning, 6am, it’s dark, raining and cold, but I’m ready to roll.




Onto the bore fest of I5, coughing my larynx up and snot running freely. It’s going to be a long day.




Yawn …. Eventually the weather improves, and I got down to Grant’s Pass without meeting any members of the constabulary for a change. Heading off down 101 to the coast, I followed this guy for a while. He was giving it a good go on his Hog, and I enjoyed following for a while ….




Right up until he pulled the most boneheaded move I have seen in a while. We caught up with a couple of cars, who were not using the turnouts to let us past. So Hog Boy decided he would, overtaking round the outside of a left hand corner in a turnout, then back around the outside of the front car around a blind right hander. What the hell, man?!

And then …. my shifter fell off.




Bugger. Luckily the Wunderlich shifter has a lanyard, which stopped the end of the shifter disappearing into the bushes, and there was enough left to do ham fisted shifting to get me to the camp site.

Eleven hours after leaving, 700 miles down, I pulled in.




Quickly setup my diminutive tent …




… Chris ran to the store for food (see how clean his bike is?) …




… while I practiced some careful self medication by raiding Chris’ well stocked drinks cabinet …




… and relaxed.
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:13 AM   #6
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Lost Coast




The Lost Coast is a section of rugged terrain on the Northern California coast that is the least developed section on the whole western seaboard. Originally, plans called for Highway 1 to be extended through this area, from Rockport to Ferndale, but thankfully plans were abandoned in 1984, and the region was left to those of us with knobby tyres. There are a few paved roads through to the couple of communities in the area, but mostly it is forestry roads and trails. One of these is the well known Usal Road.

As mentioned previously, Chris and I had looked at the Usal Road before, but it was April, a lot snottier, we were ill-prepared and incompetent. This time, some of that had changed …

But first things first, Chris knocked up bacon and eggs to get us going.




Quick stop in Legget for hose clamps and a shifter repair.




Down Highway 1 to the Usal turnoff, and a short while later we are living the life.




Here comes Chris …




Beautiful views of the ocean, and a nice hard pack surface to ride along.










A quick stop to undo my shifter fix, which only lasted an hour or so. Back to dysfunctional shifting, I guess.




Then back to zooming along …




Suddenly we are at the end … Don’t know what all the fuss was about! It was an excellent ride along the coast, and we only ran into a couple of dirt bike riders the whole way. Excellent. And a bizarre little sculpture where the Usal turns out.




We detoured down into Shelter Cove for a spot of lunch.




Seals!




A nice spot for having our lunch.




Suitably replenished, we headed back up the hill and took the unpaved King’s Peak Road north. Another nice forestry road along the coast, with a couple of small water crossings too.










Eventually this dropped us down onto a paved road that ran along the beaches, and we said goodbye to the coast for the rest of the trip.




Back over to 101, and then 36, and the first campsite we found.




Great campsite, Van Duzen-Pamplin Grove, set amongst the mighty Redwoods. I parked in a tree.




Chris made a storming dinner, peppered steak and wilted spinach.




It was a short day (my health was still suffering somewhat), but we had put to rest the Usal Road and had a great day out in the woods, and only one thing had fallen off either bike all day!
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:12 AM   #7
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Next morning, we are up early (er), though I don’t think we managed to hit the road before 9am any day. Something had been crashing around the bushes all night, and finally showed themselves in the morning.




Sun was shining, Chris did scrambled eggs and bacon, and all was god in the world.




Continuing down 36, we turned North and found our way to Last Chance Trail.




This is a roughly paved route along the top of a ridge, with gorgeous views off either side.




Very tight and twisty, with lots of surprise pot holes and gravel in the least pleasant places. Tremendous fun.



This took us up to 299, and then we carried on north through Hoopa, finally getting off the pavement again. Beautiful vistas …




… and enormous pine cones.




Chris was having an issue with the DRZ, in that it would cut out every time he stood up on the pegs.







He soldiered on, and the riding was good.




Finally Chris worked out what his problem was … when he stood, his heel would catch on the sidestand and push it down enough to activate the sidestand safety cutout.




Easy fixes make us happy.




The pavement was finally rejoined and our Eastward journey resumed.




Suddenly! Volcano!







Mt Shasta, a truly magnificent edifice.




Somehow, we had burned up most of the day, and it was time to find a campsite. Quick stop in Shasta for supplies, then onto the Fowler public camp site. Our kindly neighbours supplied us with firewood for the evening, and I supplemented Chris’ usual beer choice with some good Oregon brews. He thanked me at the time, but cursed me the next morning …


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Old 10-08-2012, 09:53 AM   #8
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Good morning California! But damn, it’s cold! The gauge on the BMW said 36 degrees, but we had burned all our donated wood the night before, so we had to tough it out. Chris, now a spoiled SoCal resident, bundled up and got on with the business of rewiring his sidestand switch.





Our first order of business was to see how high up Shasta we could get.




The Mount Shasta Wilderness is criss crossed by a whole network of old logging roads and tracks, but we worked our way up what looked like the best option.




Nice ride; sandy, rocky, a couple of water crossings.




So how far did we get up Shasta? Not very, at about 7000ft we came to a trailhead that told us to go no further.




Shasta didn’t look much closer.




Enough of that, we headed east again. I had consulted the wonderful Benchmark map and piled a bunch of waypoints into the Garmin to keep us off the pavement and in the dirt, and for most of the day it worked out brilliantly.




A very nice variety of surfaces.




We paused briefly at the local fire station and made use of their furniture. Chris took the bench.




I took the throne.




As we continued eastward, the trees became more and more sparse, and the surface became sandier.







Probably the worst surface we had all day was a freshly graveled section, that was so twitchy and unpredictable, it felt like riding on ice.




So navigation up to this point had been spot on … but that wouldn’t last. The GPS routed us up Black Mountain, which had a track marked on both the map and GPS that went around the summit, and another that lead of the south side that we were supposed to follow. Initially the track was good, but then started petering out. At this point we should have looked for an alternative, but no … we ended up bashing though soft sand on a massively overgrown trail only to find the route south was no longer there. Maybe Chris will post up the video, in which you can hear him saying “For #@%$ sake, Roper!” … oops.

We paused half way round the mountain to search for our route.




Chris pretended to check the map. I won’t mention that he is on the wrong page.




At this point, we could either complete the circle and go out the way we came, or turn around. We didn’t fancy taking on the soft stuff again, so decided to take the easy way out … ha ha ha ha HA!

More soft stuff, but going downhill now, and then this




Big downed tree, nothing to do but strip the luggage off, pick them up and carry them over. We missed a great photo opportunity when the BMW fell over atop the log, and learned that a 300lb DRZ is much nicer to carry than a 500lb BMW. Chris reloaded his bike with the 35 easy steps required to attached his luggage, and we were away again, having burned a good couple of hours getting precisely nowhere.

Heading back towards civilization, we ran into a couple of bikes, Chad on a Triumph Tiger and Jey on another F800GS.




Jey looked like he had ridden through the Touratech catalogue with the crap magnet on, having every possible TT farkle imaginable. Sensing gold I asked him if he had a spare shift lever, which he had, but when we asked him where he was riding to, and learned that he had started in France, and was 3 months into a two year round the world trip, I couldn’t possibly take his spare from him. Goes to show first impressions can be misleading ...!





He did, however, have a tube of magic metal, so I took an inch of it and fashion repair number two.




We all went for a burger together in Alturas, and then they headed south, while Chris and I loaded up a few beers and headed up to Parker Creek campground.




Chris’ bike positively glowed in the night. Well, at least when lit up by my HIDs and LEDs.




Another grand day out.


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Old 10-10-2012, 03:18 PM   #9
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Day four dawns and I can’t help but take a picture of a tree.




It’s Chris’ turn in a tree stump throne today.




Our first stop today is breakfast in Cedarville, so from our campsite we take the excellent Granger Canyon Road down.






Very good way to start the day, a little technical, a few small water crossings, and some nice curves to drift around.








This brings you out close to town, overlooking a ‘Surprise Valley’. Surprise!




Cedarville, lots of coffee and stock up on water.




We could have done with this thing preceding us everywhere, spraying water to keep the dust down.




Looping around to the north of the Cedarville, our merry troop got off the pavement, and onto the pea gravel. Chris is nothing but a cloud of dust in the distance




Until he catches up!




Three different pictures, from three different cameras at the same spot. Amazing how different the colours look




Nice view over the plains just after crossing into Nevada.




Obligatory self portrait, ruining the nice view.




Chris takes the lead for a change. As he didn’t have a GPS, or maps, he was usually following, and consequently ate a lot more dust than I did.




At least he was in front until he paused to take pictures




and then I cleared off in front again.




Antelope!




Many old abandoned farm houses around, testament to the folks that used to scratch out survival in this arid area.




Our original plan was to follow a trail marked on both map and GPS, but this gate said otherwise.




To get around was a long route south, until I spot this little shortcut, following a fenceline off into the weeds. It was sandy … and little travelled … and a little overgrown … but we decided to have a crack at it anyway.




Somewhere Chris has another video with rampant foul language about riding this section, but it was only 5 miles or so long before joining a larger, though still sandy, trail.






I decided, finally to get the GoPro out. It took one photo before a bush knocked it skyward. Typically, it’s a picture of me, turning it on.




A few miles later, just as the track became graded, we ran into a couple of guys doing the Trans America Trail. They asked how sandy the going was where we had just come from, and on hearing our report they headed off in the other direction! I think they had seen their fair share of sand already




Anyone know if this is part of the TAT? Seems like I remember something about a fence line trail somewhere …?

Poser




My dust cloud shadow again, as we head north on the main route through the desert.




Turning off onto a much more fun route.





Low on fuel we head for Dernio Junction on roads that are briefly like this




but mostly like this.




Fueled up and loaded down with beer, we head for a campsite with a hot spring, off Whitehorse Road.






Chris adjusting his chain so it doesn’t drag on the floor anymore. Bless him, he’s gotten used to shaft drive.




Great campsite, the only downside being the burn ban. No campfire?! What on earth are we supposed to do with our evening?




Lets see … yup, that’ll do nicely!




Nothing better for soothing the aching muscles.




A beautiful night, with a full moon. This shot was taken entirely by moonlight.




This one with a little help by painting the bikes with a flashlight.




Splendid.
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:55 AM   #10
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Thursday, our final full day riding together. Our night’s sleep had been a little disturbed by the sound of big splashes in the little stream alongside the camp site all night, sounding awfully like someone repeatedly throwing a paving slab in there. Presumably it was some wildlife hunting for it’s dinner, but it was strange



Today we wanted to do some riding around the Alvord Desert. The original route I plugged in had us following minor tracks.




Pretty soon, we were coming across closed gates and no trespassing signs, and not sure of the legality of what we were trying to do, we back tracked and looped around on the gravel Whitehorse Road.



How do you ride sand? Stand up, lean back, throttle on … or sit down, legs akimbo, expletives at 100 decibels.



Long stretches of gravel, good for over 70 mph, so long as you don’t think about how the bike is constantly sliding all over the place, and what would happen out here if you went down.



I worship at the alter of Garmin and Benchmark for a few minutes, and find us a nice, less gravelly route back over the hills to the Alvord valley.



At this point, we have decided to just ride through every gate we find. Chris does his best Janus impression … Janus? You know, the Roman gate keeper deity … no? Latin mythology jokes never seem to work for me.



Excellent riding, not another person was seen throughout.









Down in the Alvord valley itself.









Chris showed up liberally splattered in mud, which was curious, as we were in a very dry valley.



Somehow, he had managed to find one of the only wet patches in the whole day, and looking back, his tracks showed the ‘moment’ he had trying to get through it!



All too soon, and after a little navigation issues (they had moved the road), we rejoined the main north south road and headed south toward Fields.

Stopped for some poser photos on the dried lake bed, of course.







Before getting back on Chris’ favourite pea gravel surface.



We fueled up in Fields, and had THE BEST MILKSHAKE IN THE WORLD … that is what the sign said, at least, and in truth it wasn’t too bad at all. Here I tried to convince Chris that we should head off into the desert again, but he wasn’t having any of it. *Sigh* Back to the asphalt, and heading West toward a good mid point for us to head our separate ways.



After five days rattling around, the condition of our bikes was beginning to reflect the sorry state of this old cart.



We found our way into the woods east of Lakeview, and after finding the first campsite full of hunters eagerly preparing for the impending season opening (drinking and playing with guns ), found ourselves a spot at our second choice.



Chris got to work with the JetBoil.





Bacon wrapped peppered steak.



Camp food does not get better than this.



Bikes by firelight.





And a random ghostly ADV salute to close out the day.



Cheers!
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whitham_wannabe screwed with this post 10-12-2012 at 10:00 AM Reason: Messed up the photos ...
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Old 10-12-2012, 03:04 PM   #11
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Is this the end …?




Seems like we were just getting started, but all too suddenly, we are at the end, bar the rides home. We started the morning with a final bacon and eggs … only every one of the 3 gas canisters we had ran out before the eggs were done. So a breakfast of bacon it is then!

A final look around the campsite at Chris’ tent ….




and my somewhat deflated inflatable tent.




I gave Chris my map of California to get him home, and we rode together back to the crossroads where Chris’ route went briefly west before heading south, while mine continued ever north. We go thataway!




Cows!



Very few pictures of my ride home, so this will be brief. I hadn’t quite had enough of the deserts yet, so backtracked a little and rode up to Plush for fuel. From there I went north on gravel roads, crossed the 395 and cut the corner over to Christmas Valley. I paused briefly to celebrate the 41,000 mile mark – now, briefly, my bike and I are the same age!




This route across the desert was very isolated – I hadn’t seen anyone since the 395, and as Chris and I were sharing a toolkit, I only had half of what I needed to fix anything that went wrong. I started to feel a little exposed … so when I got to Christmas Valley, decided it was time to stop messing around and head for home up 97. Still, a nice few miles off the asphalt to start the day.

After plenty of mind numbing miles through Bend and Madras, I ended up in Deschutes River State Park – a fisherman’s campsite that I do not recommend. They did however, let me take the ‘overflow’ site, which had nice plush green grass.




The next morning, I started by heading over the border into Washington.




I thought briefly about riding up inside this contraption, just to relieve the boredom. And because I have never seen anything like this before.




Progress was held up for a while by a forest fire outside Leavenworth, and then by a bunch of people parading their Leiderhosen through the town itself.




And finally, I arrived home.




Just shy of 2500 miles for the week, a good proportion of them off the pavement, apart from the shifter, no mechanical issues, no crashed or even dropped bikes, plenty of beers sunk sitting around a campfire with a good mate … I declare this week a success.




I pulled out my phone to find a text from Chris, who had got home to San Diego precisely 2 minutes before I got home at the other end of the country. But I’ll let him tell that part of the story.
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Old 10-12-2012, 04:52 PM   #12
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Nice!

Thanks for the photos and report! Looks like a great time.

Now about the food. Peppered steak with bacon? You're making the minimalists jealous. How could meat-on-a-stick compare to that?

Dan
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Old 10-12-2012, 08:38 PM   #13
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Nice report!!! The noise you heard was the local beavers slapping their tails. I woke up one night out there to a big splash and thought a deer had fell in the creek or something. Eventually I figured it out.

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Thursday, our final full day riding together. Our night’s sleep had been a little disturbed by the sound of big splashes in the little stream alongside the camp site all night, sounding awfully like someone repeatedly throwing a paving slab in there. Presumably it was some wildlife hunting for it’s dinner, but it was strange
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:18 PM   #14
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Nicely done report. Man that looks like fun.
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Old 10-12-2012, 09:44 PM   #15
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I am now utterly convinced that the drz is one of the best bikes for this sort of riding..... Or it will be with a sixth cog....
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