ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 6 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 10-04-2012, 02:13 PM   #16
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuel Garcia O'Kely View Post
Now yer just being a smartass. Exhaust fan in ceiling of stand up shower of minimal size - door is glass open 18" at top. Believe me, in the winter a chilly wind comes over the top of that door.

Fan is I think 3x more than it really needs but it drys the shower out in minutes....
Don't forget to spec and install the gravity-close air damper or you will indeed get an annoying draft.
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 02:18 PM   #17
kobudo28
Beastly Adventurer
 
kobudo28's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: New Hampster. Live, Freeze and Ride.
Oddometer: 5,854
Figure out the cf of your bathroom, not the sq ft, and size your fan acordingly. Fan noise is rated in sones, so you can buy a fan that is very quiet and yet still moves the correct volume of air.
__________________
Be yourself, everyone else is already taken.
kobudo28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 02:20 PM   #18
NICO
NWGS's pwner!1!!1!
 
NICO's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Oddometer: 24,688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuel Garcia O'Kely View Post
We bought a fan a couple years back, they were all rated for noise level in Sones...whatver they are, but the smaller the number, the quieter they were.

My tip: Do not oversize the fan for your bathroom size - I got a bigger one than recommended and it's a cool breeze in the shower stall....
Fuck that, I'll take a cool breeze over condensation on the walls and ceiling. I installed a Broan model that moves 300cfm, far superior to the turds that move less than 1/3 that. It's a touch louder than those inferior models, but I find it to be a fantastic trade-off.
NICO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 04:10 PM   #19
troidus
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Oddometer: 13,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by NICO View Post
Fuck that, I'll take a cool breeze over condensation on the walls and ceiling. I installed a Broan model that moves 300cfm, far superior to the turds that move less than 1/3 that. It's a touch louder than those inferior models, but I find it to be a fantastic trade-off.
Move too much air in a tight house and you'll be pulling flue gasses into your living space, unless you go with a make-up air system.
troidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 04:48 PM   #20
Merlin III
Mean SOB
 
Merlin III's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Oddometer: 1,512
Quote:
Originally Posted by troidus View Post
Move too much air in a tight house and you'll be pulling flue gasses into your living space, unless you go with a make-up air system.
It would have to be a very tight house to do that IMHO. If the house is that tight you are probably going to have moisture problems over the whole house (i.e. mold).
__________________
"I have approximate answers and possible beliefs and different degrees of certainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure about anything." Richard Feynman, CalTech Scientist, Challenger Disaster Committee member.
Merlin III is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2012, 07:21 PM   #21
vwboomer OP
Buffoon
 
vwboomer's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: WI
Oddometer: 9,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubebender View Post
Pansonic Whisper Quiet in my 2 bathrooms with 10,20,30, and 60 minute timer switches.

Got them here. Free Shipping
Thanks for the link. I wasn't able to find a local retailer so that seems like the best option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by troidus View Post
Make sure your hole saw is sharp and the shingles aren't cold and you should be OK. This is the roof vent I used:



which comes with its own flashing, so you just need to cut the shingles to fit and goop the seams. I didn't use the included duct, since I had 4" insulated duct already. In my case, since I had a package of shingles on hand, I went ahead and replaced all the shingles around the new opening. I did have to use a 5" hole saw so there would be room for the duct insulation and the clamps.
That's the type I will go with. a screen/spring loaded door will keep critters out and drafts down

Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Don't forget to spec and install the gravity-close air damper or you will i ndeed get an annoying draft.
The fan has one built in. between that and one on the roof it should be pretty well sealed.

appreciate the advice on this. Looks like I"m going ot have to move on this in the next week or two.
I very rarely shower at home, but even so you can see the drips on the walls. The house was built in 1947 and when I moved in 4 years ago that was tops on my list
__________________

vwboomer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2012, 03:28 PM   #22
dan-c
Back
 
dan-c's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: SATX
Oddometer: 13,611
Quote:
Originally Posted by troidus View Post
I have it on a dimmer so I can slow the fan down, but I don't know if it's worth it or not.

.
I don't think it's a good idea to have a dimmer on an ac motor unless it's made for it. IIRC it's a fire hazard from the heat generated by low voltage to the motor.
dan-c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2012, 04:04 PM   #23
troidus
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Oddometer: 13,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by dan-c View Post
I don't think it's a good idea to have a dimmer on an ac motor unless it's made for it. IIRC it's a fire hazard from the heat generated by low voltage to the motor.
It's called out in the specs. There are several options on this unit. High speed only, low speed only, two speed (with a spdt switch) or variable speed. They do not call for a PWM, a rheostat is fine. From the literature:

Models 100, 100x and 125
:

Single-phase, 120V 60Hz, shaded pole induction asynchronous motor in die cast aluminum. All
motors include direct two speed connection and are also suitable for voltage speed control.
Class ll electrical insulation (model 100) & Class l (models 100x and 125)
IP 44 Protection
Class B Motor Insulation
Safety auto reset Thermal Overload Protection (fuse type)
Self-lubricating sleeve bearings.
Suitable for working airstreams up to 104 F (40C).

I dont' remember if I have an "X" or not. The X has a self-resetting breaker, instead of a fuse.
troidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 07:40 AM   #24
McB
Joe 40 ouncer
 
McB's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2005
Location: North Slope of the Flint Hills
Oddometer: 15,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwboomer View Post
I could vent it over the front porch where it is open for ventilation
Idyllic scene. Wife, on a lovely late spring morning when the sun is hitting and the temps are rising, takes her coffee and paper out to the porch, sits back comfortably with her feet up, listening to the birds singing, when out of nowhere...........
McB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 08:30 AM   #25
Dave in Wi
Beastly Adventurer
 
Dave in Wi's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Madison WI (40 Square Miles Surrounded By Reality)
Oddometer: 1,969
http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=plpp&v=WEffhgvuVwk

This video has a nice illustration of how to lap the shingles over a new vent flashing. I would have used a little roofing cement to help hold the shingled down myself.
__________________
Dave in WI
2002 ZRX1200R
1975 XL100
1988 DT50
"Daddy, it's five o'clock sometime!"
Dave in Wi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 09:36 AM   #26
DriveShaft
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 4,329
Quote:
Originally Posted by troidus View Post
It's called out in the specs. There are several options on this unit. High speed only, low speed only, two speed (with a spdt switch) or variable speed. They do not call for a PWM, a rheostat is fine. From the literature:

Models 100, 100x and 125
:

Single-phase, 120V 60Hz, shaded pole induction asynchronous motor in die cast aluminum. All
motors include direct two speed connection and are also suitable for voltage speed control.
Class ll electrical insulation (model 100) & Class l (models 100x and 125)
IP 44 Protection
Class B Motor Insulation
Safety auto reset Thermal Overload Protection (fuse type)
Self-lubricating sleeve bearings.
Suitable for working airstreams up to 104 F (40C).

I dont' remember if I have an "X" or not. The X has a self-resetting breaker, instead of a fuse.
wow...I'm coming to you for specs when I redo the house! That is one fancy-ass fan you got there! :)
DriveShaft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 10:43 AM   #27
BerndM
Shiftless One
 
BerndM's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Near Disneyland, in SoCal.
Oddometer: 1,561
Years ago when I replaced the ceiling fan in my smaller bathroom I did quite a bit of reading on the internet. I was interested in one in particular because it claimed it was almost silent. Nice. I don't remember why I didn't end up with that but the thing is, for that unit, the fan itself was actually mounted to the roof or wall, NOT in the ceiling, so the sound level was waaaayyyy lower.
I'm sure a Google will turn it up for you.
BerndM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 05:38 PM   #28
MrBob
Certified Geezer
 
MrBob's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Boulderish, CO
Oddometer: 7,561
As others have mentioned, spend a few bucks on a good fan. Use rigid vent pipe rather than the expandable for much greater efficiency and longer life.
Use a flapper vent to keep cold drafts out.
Use a flat bar to pop the nails on the shingles in the area where the hole will be cut and than weave the shingles back into place around the collar you install. You'll need minimal goop to seal the nail heads and around the cutout and that will do it. A laser pointer or pendulum will help you line things up.
Do not, like one dumbass I know, wire your fan to a GFI relay circuit because you'll trip it every time you hit the switch. But I never did it again.
__________________
"When I was younger I was afraid I'd die riding now that I'm old and falling apart, I'm afraid I won't."
bwanacswan's dad

MrBob screwed with this post 10-06-2012 at 10:17 PM
MrBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 08:40 PM   #29
troidus
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Oddometer: 13,354
I would add that you want to mark your vent location from inside the attic so you don't accidentally put your hole saw through a rafter. I drilled a small hole from the inside, then used the hole saw from the outside. I suppose you could do the whole thing from the inside, but I wanted to watch the felt when the saw hit it to make sure it cut, rather than tore.
troidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 11:06 PM   #30
soyanarchisto
Beastly Adventurer
 
soyanarchisto's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Sunny PDX
Oddometer: 3,440
I replaced my bathroom vent recently. Only thing I can add is make sure you turn the motherfucking breaker off before you crawl into the attic.

Don't ask me why.
soyanarchisto is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014