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Old 10-08-2012, 10:13 AM   #31
Nailhead
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Don't be leery of cutting a ducting hole through asphalt shingles-- just use a hook blade in a utility knife to cut what you need out of the shingle(s) THEN use a hole saw to cut the roof deck. I have always used a jig or recip saw myself because I hate using large hole saws.

Lap the uphill shingle over the duct flashing, lap the downhill one underneath, and use sealant under the flashing, the uphill shingle at the cutout, and anywhere you might have pried that shingle loose from one underneath. Screw the flashing down with gasketed screws and that should do it. I seal around the screw heads also, because it's too easy to crush those little rubber gaskets.

That's how I do it.
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:43 AM   #32
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I can't use a wall vent due to brick siding.

I figured to drill a pilot hole from the inside, stick a piece of wire through it and find it on the roof. I will try to remove a couple shingles, but they are getting pretty fragile.

I have zero idea what breaker the bathroom is on. probably two. things might have made sense with the old fuse box, but whenever it was converted to breakers there seems to be no reason as to what is fed off each breaker
nothing like splicing into 65 year old wires

the wires go up to the attic from the basement for every thing. I'm not sure where exactly but shouldn't be too difficult to find. maybe i can lay that 12" of insulation that is still in the bags up there. for 3 years
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:03 AM   #33
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I will try to remove a couple shingles, but they are getting pretty fragile.
Don't remove any-- just gently pry the uphill one(s) up with a sharp(ish) pry bar or restorer's cat's paw. Wait for a warm (not hot) day so the shingles are more flexible.
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:51 AM   #34
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I can't use a wall vent due to brick siding.

I figured to drill a pilot hole from the inside, stick a piece of wire through it and find it on the roof. I will try to remove a couple shingles, but they are getting pretty fragile.

I have zero idea what breaker the bathroom is on. probably two. things might have made sense with the old fuse box, but whenever it was converted to breakers there seems to be no reason as to what is fed off each breaker
In an old house, a useful piece of kit is a circuit tracer, or a toner. They're pretty affordable these days, and sure as hell beat the redneck ways of analysis. :)

We went through the brick to get a 240v subpanel on the exterior of the house. There's definitely a chance of busting it up, if you rush it, but it's doable.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:51 AM   #35
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I don't want to hijack your thread, but thought I'd put this out there. I aborted my bath fan replacement Saturday after I opened the box and got a look at the fan. The bottom of the housing has a flange on it, which means I'd have to cut the hole in the drywall ceiling oversized to get the fan in from above. It seems the fan is designed for new construction, to be installed before the drywall is in place. It's quite possible I'm over thinking this, but I'd rather not have to cut the hole oversized and have to seal up the perimeter with expanding foam. I'm going to stop in the stores this week and take a closer look at what they've got. And see if they have a good fan that might work better for existing construction.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:15 AM   #36
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I don't want to hijack your thread, but thought I'd put this out there. I aborted my bath fan replacement Saturday after I opened the box and got a look at the fan. The bottom of the housing has a flange on it, which means I'd have to cut the hole in the drywall ceiling oversized to get the fan in from above. It seems the fan is designed for new construction, to be installed before the drywall is in place. It's quite possible I'm over thinking this, but I'd rather not have to cut the hole oversized and have to seal up the perimeter with expanding foam. I'm going to stop in the stores this week and take a closer look at what they've got. And see if they have a good fan that might work better for existing construction.
Generally, yes, if the old one has the flanges, it was designed to be installed before the sheetrock goes up.

And inside, it's very modular, so if your heater craps out, or your fan is louder than a chevy, or goes tits up, or if the lens just starts to turn yellow & crappy, you just call them up for a replacement module, and install it in the existing shell.

But retrofit fans do exist with alternate means of affixing a frame. It's not so bad.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:07 AM   #37
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My old fan is very undersized for the size of the bathroom, it should be about 110 cfm and the one that's there is 40 or 50. This leads to way too much humidity especially in the winter, with lots of condensation on the windows. The existing g fan has about an 8 inch square cutout, the 100 cfm + fans are all larger.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:31 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Dave in Wi View Post
I don't want to hijack your thread, but thought I'd put this out there. I aborted my bath fan replacement Saturday after I opened the box and got a look at the fan. The bottom of the housing has a flange on it, which means I'd have to cut the hole in the drywall ceiling oversized to get the fan in from above. It seems the fan is designed for new construction, to be installed before the drywall is in place. It's quite possible I'm over thinking this, but I'd rather not have to cut the hole oversized and have to seal up the perimeter with expanding foam. I'm going to stop in the stores this week and take a closer look at what they've got. And see if they have a good fan that might work better for existing construction.
Cut the flange off with tin snips & screw the fan to a joist from the inside with some drywall screws. I had the same problem with the vent fan I bought compounded by having to remove the wiring enclosure and reinstalling it once I mounted the unit.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:52 AM   #39
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The existing fan has about an 8 inch square cutout, the 100 cfm + fans are all larger.
That's another advantage to remote fans. My ceiling opening is now a 4" round cutout. I offset it to the side so if someone wants to add a Solatube later, there's nothing in the way in the middle of the ceiling.
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:39 AM   #40
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Cut the flange off with tin snips & screw the fan to a joist from the inside with some drywall screws.
Now there is a thought. If I can't buy one without flanges, I can do thAt.
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Old 10-09-2012, 10:20 AM   #41
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Now there is a thought. If I can't buy one without flanges, I can do thAt.
I HAD to: 100 miles away from the Lowes I bought it from with no alternative.

It works fine, BTW.
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:29 AM   #42
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Move too much air in a tight house and you'll be pulling flue gasses into your living space, unless you go with a make-up air system.
House is 50 years old. Not a concern.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:23 PM   #43
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House is 50 years old. Not a concern.
Depends on the house. Our kitchen exhaust hood fan speed changes depending on whether the door to the garage is open or not.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:26 PM   #44
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I actually do have to watch this despite the house being 65 years old. Not so much with th ebath fan as the leaks on the doors will take care of that, but when I get my basement brewery going, I don't want to be sucking back down the chimney when I have a fire going
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:29 PM   #45
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Depends on the house. Our kitchen exhaust hood fan speed changes depending on whether the door to the garage is open or not.
That may be, but not the case here. I have a 600cfm exhaust hood, Best by Broan model #U102, and there is never any difference noted. You must have better windows and doors than we do.

Love my exhaust fan.



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