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Old 10-07-2012, 01:02 PM   #16
itsforrest
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Quote:
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...I looked to see if the Symba was still available, and found the SymWolf 150, a small 150cc motorcycle, freeway legal, 350 pound load capacity, and manual transmission. It also has a centerstand. I think I'm going to take a look at that thing.
I work in a scooter shop that is a SYM dealer. The Symba is still available. We have sold a few of them this summer. We have also sold a few of the Wolf 150. The Wolf is a very nicely made bike. A fellow came in on a Yamaha R6 and test rode the Wolf. When he came back he said the transmission was as smooth as any bike he had ridden and way nicer than his R6. Comparing the two, I was a bit surprised at how zippy the Symba is when I first rode it. The Wolf seems to be geared taller and is slower off the line but definitely is a better cruiser at higher speeds. I still wouldn't feel terribly comfortable on the freeway with the Wolfe. It can go 65 given the space to get there but there's nothing left in reserve to get out of the way of traffic.
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Old 10-07-2012, 08:03 PM   #17
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I've had a chance to look at the Misfit up close but have not ridden one. In my opinion, the fit and finish on the SYM Wolf is a bit nicer than the Misfit. Here's an article reviewing both bikes:
http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/8/1310...ha-Misfit.aspx
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:19 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I looked to see if the Symba was still available, and found the SymWolf 150, a small 150cc motorcycle, freeway legal, 350 pound load capacity, and manual transmission. It also has a centerstand. I think I'm going to take a look at that thing.
I was looking at the SymWolf, too, but I couldn't come up with a reason to have it when my DR200 can do most of what it does as a road bike. Still fascinated by these types of bikes.
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:21 PM   #19
V Saarela
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I ride a Honda Varadero 1000 summertime and a Honda CBR 600 wintertime. From time to time I do some scootrides. My rides have been a Honda ANF 125 Innova and Honda Zoomer(Ruckus) 50cc and the new Honda Vision 50cc.

This summer I made with the Innova a 25 hour ride and manage to get on this time 1720 kilometres(1068 miles)Honda.
With the ruckus(swedish ruckus have topspeed 42 kph/26mpg) when heading North cape I did one day 550 kms(342 miles).
This summer I have also been with the Vision 50cc at alps(Grossglockner, Dolomits, Stelvio etc)....have to push the moped few times
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:38 PM   #20
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FWIW, I know quite a few people who when asked about taking a small scooter for long tours respond with:

"Can you ride a scooter 20 miles?"

To which the response is almost always "yes".

Then answer is then "think of the 1,000 mile trip as 50 trips of 20 miles ridden sequentially."
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:32 PM   #21
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Solo Spiti Scooter Salvation http://www.bcmtouring.com/forum/trav...vation-t31458/
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:04 PM   #22
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I was looking at the SymWolf, too, but I couldn't come up with a reason to have it when my DR200 can do most of what it does as a road bike. Still fascinated by these types of bikes.
I have an XT225. But the thing that got my attention about the SymWolf 150 was first it's styling, and the fact that it has a centerstand. Even the Symba would be a real problem on a long distance ride without a centerstand. Lack of one could even get you into big trouble much closer to home. I might very well already own a TU250 if it had a centerstand. My XT225 has an aftermarket centerstand (unfortunately probably no longer available, as the guy that was making them decided to quit), a kickstarter from a TTR-225, a 4 gallon Clarke gas tank, and a really nice rack. I use it mostly for off road riding.

I am now more interested in the Symba, now that it is rated to carry 300 pounds instead of 200 pounds. That extra 100 pounds makes all the difference. Just like the scooter, I would not be trying to ride it around the world. I'm afraid my physical condition would prevent that. But trips around 1000 miles are definitely doable, and where the Symba has it all over a 125cc scooter is it's manual transmission, which allows it to climb mountains which are off limits to my two 125cc CVT scooters.


I have noticed something a lot of people have in common when talking about riding small motorcycles and scooters, and that is their lack of "reserve" power. While that is true, to me it is just something you have to deal with when riding these small bikes, and is one of the major differences between riding a small bike and a much larger one. I have had major issues trying to ride a 50cc scooter in town, due to it's low speed, and especially it's lack of acceleration. You can literally get run over from behind when the light turns green before you have moved 5 feet. Because of this, I no longer try to ride 50cc scooters in town. But, I put over 10,000 miles on an '07 Honda Met out on rural roads, most of them with a speed limit of 65 mph, and never felt like I was in danger. Just like riding a bicycle, you have to accept that you cannot outrun traffic, and learn to deal with it in a different way.

I have ridden my XT225 on interstate highways for thousands of miles, at an indicated speed of about 60 mph, with almost nothing in reserve (It will top 70 , but takes forever to get from 60 to 70) I ride in the right lane, wear a solid white helmet and an orange reflective vest (the most common colors for road construction workers) and just cruise a long. There have been a couple of times when I have seen vehicles coming up too close to me from behind, and I moved over on to the shoulder. When I did, both times they moved over into the left lane and passed. On a really small bike, there is just no way you are going to be able to keep up with traffic, even on roads with low speed limits. My Vino 125, Zuma 125, and Stella keep up fine in town, but no way will they be able to keep up on any road with a speed limit over 45.

JerryH screwed with this post 10-08-2012 at 03:56 PM
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:01 PM   #23
John Fabian
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Scooter Touring

I've taken several trips over 1,000 miles each on a 150cc scooter. Here's my blog from this past summer: The-Coulee.blogspot.com. I wrote about my adventure in the summer of 2011 in my book, Road Wise.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:20 PM   #24
hexnut
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Heres a Symba trip from California to Alaska.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=592359
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:19 PM   #25
Klay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I have an XT225. But the thing that got my attention about the SymWolf 150 was first it's styling, and the fact that it has a centerstand. Even the Symba would be a real problem on a long distance ride without a centerstand. Lack of one could even get you into big trouble much closer to home.
I used to always be desirous of a centerstand, but I've changed and no longer think it's necessary, even for bigger bikes such as my DR650, which is still relatively lightweight. On my DR650, I just stick one of the luggage pieces under the swingarm or under the bashplate. The smaller bikes I find an object to use or just lay them on their side. But I don't have any physical limitation that prevents me from just muscling them around.


The Sym Wolf 150 is very attractive in terms of styling.
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:09 AM   #26
hugemoth
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I've seen a device that takes the place of a center stand. It's basically a small aluminum crutch that when needed is attached to the right side foot peg or swing arm and a spacer is placed under the existing side stand. Together they hold the rear wheel off the ground. I'm thinking of making one from pieces of a Harbor Freight folding aluminum cane.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klay View Post
I used to always be desirous of a centerstand, but I've changed and no longer think it's necessary, even for bigger bikes such as my DR650, which is still relatively lightweight. On my DR650, I just stick one of the luggage pieces under the swingarm or under the bashplate. The smaller bikes I find an object to use or just lay them on their side. But I don't have any physical limitation that prevents me from just muscling them around.


The Sym Wolf 150 is very attractive in terms of styling.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:55 PM   #27
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Back when I was doing some long distance riding on a Honda Rebel, which does not have a centerstand, but does have tube type tires, I built a bolt on sidestand for the right side. Basically it was just a piece of 1/2" pipe welded to a flat 1/4" thick steel plate at an angle. I drilled 2 holes in the plate, that matched the holes on the footpeg bracket. To use it, I put a piece of 2x4 under the stock sidestand, to get the bike as vertical as possible, and to take some of the strain off the stock stand and it's welded on mounting bracket (I have seen more than one bike with the sidestand bracket broke right off the frame) Then I had to remove the right side footpeg bracket, push the bike to the left to raise the wheels off the ground, and bolt on the homemade stand to the frame to hold it in that position. A lot of trouble yes, and not something I would use for routine chain maintenance, but it could be a lifesaver out on the side of the road when you had a flat tire. Because it bolted to the bike with two bolts, there was no way it could slip and let the bike fall while a wheel was off. This worked on the Rebel, because of it's small size and light weight. It would not likely work on a large streetbike. I was going to make one to fit my XT225, which also has the left footpeg bracket attached with 2 bolts, but before I got around to it, I found the guy that was making the centerstands and immediately ordered one. Best investment I've ever made for that bike. I can now ride way out into the middle of nowhere, and not have to worry about flat tires. The XT225 is a small lightweight bike, and at home I often set it up on a 5 gallon bucket when I want both wheels off the ground at once. But you are not likely to find a 5 gallon bucket out on the trail.


I have asked a few Harley riders what they do in case of a flat tire while riding a bike with tube type tires, and their answer has always been the same. A cell phone and a road service plan. I sure hope they don't get stuck where their cell phone don't work. I'm thinking about getting one of those SPOT gadgets.


BTW, you can get aftermarket centerstands for both the DR650 and KLR650 from two or three different places. My former '01 KLR had one from DualStar.

Oh, and for something funny, not too long after getting my '09 Stella, I was riding with a few other Stella and vintage Vespa riders. We were not very far from civilization, but were out on the road nevertheless. Now, these scooters have a spare tire, just like a car, already mounted on a spare wheel. When the scooter is on the centerstand, unlike a motorcycle, where the rear wheel is off the ground, it is the front wheel that is off the ground. I carry a piece of 2x4 to shove under the gearbox to raise the rear end. But the one guy that had a flat had a performance exhaust, and it prevented removing the rear wheel. You first had to remove the exhaust, which was red hot. So we all spent about an hour waiting for the exhaust to cool and this guy to remove his exhaust, change the wheel, and put the exhaust back on. I guess he either never thought of that, or didn't care. If you are willing to spend the money, you can buy one piece wheels for the Stella and vintage Vespas that allow the use of tubeless tires. But I guess that isn't the status symbol that a loud aftermarket pipe is. Many riders used to remove their centerstands (back when many bikes actually came with them) to install an aftermarket exhaust. I guess I just think about things differently. I have never been a boy scout, but I am a firm believer in their motto "BE PREPARED"


It is also completely unnecessary for any motorcycle to even use tube type tires, especially one designed for road use. BMW has been using tubeless spoke type wheels for a long time, but apparently only on the models they build, not the chain drive singles. The R1200GS uses them, as did the R1200C. Honda used them way back in '86 on the '86 and '87 Rebel 450, The ONLY bike they ever used them on. Over a quarter century later, those wheels are still holding up fine.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:59 PM   #28
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The old 2 stroke Vespas were designed to be laid over on the right side, without damage, to have the wheel changed. It would rest on 3 points, the kick start lever, the edge of the floorboard, and the throttle grip. Changing a rear tire took all of 5 minutes, the front took 3, if you were slow. IMO that was a major advantage over today's scoots and all motorcycles.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:19 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post

I have noticed something a lot of people have in common when talking about riding small motorcycles and scooters, and that is their lack of "reserve" power. While that is true, to me it is just something you have to deal with when riding these small bikes, and is one of the major differences between riding a small bike and a much larger one.
My 2smoke ETON 50 is one of the funnest bikes Ive ever had. After all theses decades of big- BIG - BIGGER, hooning this little lo-tech anachronism around town like an imbecile brings back memories of 1977 and 100cc Hodakas named after rodents ! Soooo much fun. Using momentum and exploiting car ppls slow, lazy reflex's, I OWN traffic in the city. The rural roads, not so much . . .
I dont think "reserve power". Just WFO and point ☞
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:25 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by hugemoth View Post
The old 2 stroke Vespas were designed to be laid over on the right side, without damage, to have the wheel changed. It would rest on 3 points, the kick start lever, the edge of the floorboard, and the throttle grip. Changing a rear tire took all of 5 minutes, the front took 3, if you were slow. IMO that was a major advantage over today's scoots and all motorcycles.


I got a flat on my Stella, and it was easier than changing a bicycle tire.

On the Harleys, If you carry a small C-Clamp and a few levers, you can pull the tube and patch the tire without removing the wheel. If its a tube ripping blowout, yer outta luck

When I woods raced, I always kept my tires bloatated way more than anyone else, and never had to tree-stump or boulder straddle at the checkpoints to fix pinch flats . . . a little squirmier for sure, but better than having to pull a splooge caked tire/tube in the rain
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