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Old 10-14-2012, 12:41 AM   #76
dhillr
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Just read this and realized that I REALLY need to stop riding offroad alone. First, it freaks my wife out. Second, there's lots of chances to get hurt with all the big rocks we have around here.

Jeeping offroad alone, however.... totally safe!

Thanks for sharing....was a good read.
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Old 10-14-2012, 04:05 AM   #77
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.

Firstly, thanks for posting. It takes balls to tell the story when you know you f&^$ed up. Secondly, if you think you have the market cornered on being stupid you're wrong, we've all been there. Lastly, I have an R1200GS and live in Las Cruces. Next time you plan to go get lost, dehydrated, tear your shit up, have to call your wife and explain you're a dipshit and visit the hospital call me. I'll go with you cause i'm an expert at all that.
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:55 AM   #78
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Another +1 on the ham radio and the SPOT, model with the texting ability.

The only other things I would add is a fresh, brand-new, clean high-visibility vest; a few smoke flares (they are available a boating/marine shops like West Marine) and toss in a few red road flares, which you should have anyway along with your first-aid kit. These items take up very little space and can always stay in the panniers.

Now the really important thing, just don't start a forest fire using the flares!
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Old 10-14-2012, 10:11 AM   #79
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Originally Posted by Snarky View Post
...

HOWEVER. Between the BMW Service Manager and my Claims adjuster, they came up with the sum of.... $11,000.

$11,000... The only way I can figure that they came up with this number is that they chose to replace every single scratched part. Insane! I haven't gotten the itemized invoice yet, but I can't wait. I'm assume almost none of it was engine related. The one thing I do know is, that my scuffed final drive and front rim? Yeah, they are replacing them... WTF?...
As a prior insurance adjuster, I'll comment. Insurance pays to return the bike to pre-loss condition. If there are used parts available, they'll use those, but usually not on a current model bike. Also, used parts are not available for motorcycles the way they are for cars...so, you usually get new parts. Insurance pays retail for parts, so they pay BMW prices. Sometimes insurance can negotiate a lower labor rate, but usually the motorcycle dealers have insurance companies by the balls because they can't just go to the next shop with a lower rate because there are few motocycle mechanics for a particular brand, especially something "exotic".

Insurance pays for what you or I wouldn't pay for if we had to pay out of pocket. For you or I the total cost of repair would probably be closer to your $1500 (probably more, because one wheel might be $1500) amount, but you and I would ride around with bent luggage racks and scratches because there's no way we'd replace some of the stuff if we had to pay out of pocket.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:24 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by Mr.Cairo View Post
Another +1 on the ham radio and the SPOT, model with the texting ability.

Now the really important thing, just don't start a forest fire using the flares!
If you're in a western forest, and you use flares. . . you'll likely be starting a fire. Besides, who's going to see you out in the sticks, and come to your assistance? Someone may see that glow in the trees/brush and think it a UFO and start poking around out of curiosity?
I'd hate to see a forest fire started by an "Adventure Rider" because he deployed a flare after getting himself into an overnight position.

Sleeping int he woods is actually nice if you are (even slightly) prepared. Running from a forest fire is never nice (I can only imagine the horror level increases greatly if it's a fire you had started).
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:15 PM   #81
Wy'east
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pariahtize View Post
If you're in a western forest, and you use flares. . . you'll likely be starting a fire. Besides, who's going to see you out in the sticks, and come to your assistance? Someone may see that glow in the trees/brush and think it a UFO and start poking around out of curiosity?
I'd hate to see a forest fire started by an "Adventure Rider" because he deployed a flare after getting himself into an overnight position.

Sleeping int he woods is actually nice if you are (even slightly) prepared. Running from a forest fire is never nice (I can only imagine the horror level increases greatly if it's a fire you had started).
Man I knew somebody was going to say this, but I thought I'd get lucky. Apparently not. These are signalling devices for people that are actively looking for you. I'll agree with you that if nobody is looking, nobody will see anything.

If a tree falls in the forest and nobody is around to hear it, does it still make a noise? Anyway...

After 30+ plus years of camping all over the place in and out of National Parks and forests and cooking on open flames in said places, I've never managed to start a forest fire let alone have anything get out of hand and I don't think I'm the only one.

Now about poking around in the bush for a UFO...
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:41 PM   #82
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Good story. I have had a few moments that were similar.

I am of the opinion that GPS can sometimes be a bad thing. I followed a track on my 950 adv in baja for 5 miles down a deep sandy wash, only to find out that the road I was hoping to intersect did not exist. It was here that I had the ah ha moment and realized that I was an idiot and could die out there. Had I not had the gps I would not have attempted it. I am starting to prefer actual maps with the gps as a backup. The gps seems to inhibit my situational awareness.

I also have to chime in on the hard bags. It kills me to see guys on a day trip with all the hard bags on. I can see if your going on a beer run, or RTW, but if you are just riding around they are not worth the effort to me. Too easy to get your foot hung up under them in the rough stuff.

Here is one of my bikes setup for a week trip.



I have the hard bags for my KTM but have never even put them on.

-John
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azcagiva screwed with this post 10-14-2012 at 01:28 PM
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:54 PM   #83
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After reading through all of this, I feel like I should prep myself and my bike for the worst a bit better. I will be riding a KTM 640 A, sometimes alone in far off and dangerous places next season... i do have lots experience in the woods with my 250. But I think your situation reenforces the unspoken rules of a dangerous sport. Danger is compounded with mistakes, the more you make, the more at risk you become. Some mistakes make things way worse, like your water situation and being alone and not having outside contact, it reminds me of one of those A&E or Discovery Channel shows. Thanks for sharing your story. We all make mistakes, and its easy to do when you're in a rush or distracted. Its a good reminder and a cautionary tale for all of us.
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:08 PM   #84
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I one of my solutions for being stranded was a bonfire, there was a ton of collected wood that the forest service had collected in piles. I noticed a bunch of burnt down trees, this place has a habit of combusting.

A flare gun would have been nice. I don't know how staffed the fire towers are at this time of year. But I figure between the aircraft, the forest service and ranches, somebody might have saw it...

I'm still trying to decide between an ACR beacon, a Spot II Messenger, or a DeLorme Communicator. It's hard to gauge them as only a few people ever need to utilize them. Some of the reports of Spot usage I've seen, also had those folk able to call the police with cell phones too... I don't know, and the plans are all a bit confusing and apples to oranges too.

I used to carry a ton of gear, survival and otherwise. I eventually slimmed it down, I never expected to be lost within 200 miles of where I lived. Now I'm going to gear back up with water, fire, rain, and cold gear at all times. And I'm not going to let myself slip. It's one thing if you trailer your bike to where you're exploring, and have a basecamp. It's another thing entirely if you're on your lonesome.

Nobody is going to ride with me from El Paso to DFW for the holidays, because it's terrible. So if I wanted to take the back roads for a while and get off the interstate, I would be in this same situation. I don't want to be caught unprepared again.

My AllState estimate said I couldn't share the information on it for whatever reason. Also I don't want to go through an redact all the person info in it because I'm desperately lazy. Suffice to say, it's an impressive list. I'm looking forward to having the bike back in two weeks or so. I'm spending this time working on the truck some. I miss the bike though, and the weather has been great too :(

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Old 10-14-2012, 07:15 PM   #85
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Two observations if I might;

1. As has already been said, traveling rough, mountain country at night is just a plain bad idea. In survival school, it was always emphasized to wait until light.

2. You absolutely cannot trust the little off-road lines on Garmin. I tried to detour around a traffic tie up out of Laredo and rode about 40 miles of gravel only to find a locked gate and high fence across the road, which then led to another 40 miles of gravel and another hour or so getting around the traffic tie-up. All this at 108 degrees, but I did have water.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:34 PM   #86
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Originally Posted by hgulledge View Post
Two observations if I might;

1. As has already been said, traveling rough, mountain country at night is just a plain bad idea. In survival school, it was always emphasized to wait until light.

2. You absolutely cannot trust the little off-road lines on Garmin. I tried to detour around a traffic tie up out of Laredo and rode about 40 miles of gravel only to find a locked gate and high fence across the road, which then led to another 40 miles of gravel and another hour or so getting around the traffic tie-up. All this at 108 degrees, but I did have water.
1. On foot, or on a bike? I'm aware the answer is both. It was light while I was on a bike. On foot I had no choice, I had to have water, lack of water makes you crazy as shit. You do not fear death, you just want a drink. I was more or less on 'road' rather than cross country most of the 10 miles except for a gap I had to bridge between two dead end roads. The roads were bad, especially in motocross boots, but I was able to traverse it. It's not that rough in the Lincoln Mountains, I've hiked worse in the Franklin Mountains, but I must admit, my experience in at least the Lincoln National Forest is limited, I've had more experience north towards Ruidoso where I used to live. At no point did I need to climb chains on a sheer rock face like on the Ron Coleman Trail, which is even worse if you do it in the summer.

Still, you do make a good point, wait until light if you can.

2. Well, they were 'roads' technically, but yeah, Garmin is wrong a lot, but not at much as TomTom, but I carry both, they vary in degree of wrongness.

I had luck on detours with garmin 'once'. I was stuck in 105 degree traffic on I-20. There was a wild fire sweeping across the road, I was able to use garmin to navigate out of the storm storm. No gravel though, sadly. I need to learn to trust my own judgement and carry paper maps too.

I have no excuse not to carry a paper map, I've been taught map reading and navigation.
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Old 10-15-2012, 01:06 AM   #87
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Great story, man! Glad you're ok. Good to see you're a member of the zombie response team, too.

I always ride with my "10 essentials" plus water...a carryover from my Boy Scout days.
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Old 10-15-2012, 08:46 AM   #88
Wy'east
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Good luck and all, but I'd be careful as a all hell setting of a flare gun/aerial flare in the forest! You have absolutely no control where the damn thing will go with a high potential of starting a forest fire. Flare guns are good for the deserts and the seas.

Believe me if you set off smoke flare in the forest and someone is looking for you in the general area, they would have to be blind not to see it.

Lots of good stuff in this thread.
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Old 10-15-2012, 11:40 AM   #89
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Another +1 on the ham radio and the SPOT, model with the texting ability.

The only other things I would add is a fresh, brand-new, clean high-visibility vest; a few smoke flares (they are available a boating/marine shops like West Marine) and toss in a few red road flares, which you should have anyway along with your first-aid kit. These items take up very little space and can always stay in the panniers.

Now the really important thing, just don't start a forest fire using the flares!
Neither my motorcycle nor my snowmobile survival kits contain any flares. I could think up a pretty big list of far more useful things that would weigh the same and take the same amount of space. I suppose if you're venturing off on a bike the size and weight of a small station wagon, you might not be thinking the same way I am...
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Old 10-15-2012, 12:46 PM   #90
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On a bike that sees street and off road use I can see the value of flares. They can be a great fire starter, distress signal, and road marker if you're broken down on the side of the road. There are worse things, less effective things, you can carry in a pannier than a road flare.
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