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Old 10-30-2012, 06:30 PM   #361
damurph
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Masonry heaters. Ten tonnes of thermal mass (brick,stone ) lit once a day with a full bonfire.
Heats the mass and it radiates that heat all day Google it.
Not new though. Been around for centuries. Extreme efficiency.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:52 AM   #362
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Originally Posted by damurph View Post
Masonry heaters. Ten tonnes of thermal mass (brick,stone ) lit once a day with a full bonfire.
Heats the mass and it radiates that heat all day Google it.
Not new though. Been around for centuries. Extreme efficiency.
IDScarecrow has one..which he posted about here: http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....&postcount=142

I'm really currious how they would work around here (NH) on a day to day basis... seems that sizing them would be pretty critical.. but I guess you could adjust the overall BTU output by adjusting the length of the burn...

The concept is great: hot, efficient fire with no big swings in out-put temperature... but making a new fire every day would be a pain in the balls... Though you could just make a shit-ton of kindling with regular cord-wood to have on hand...

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Old 11-03-2012, 03:10 PM   #363
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I like those big mass heaters but I do have a lot of questions about how they work during this time of year, when we need a quick fire in the AM and no heat later in the afternoon and evening.

I don't mind lighting a fire every AM - I make cartons of kindling and just light it up every morning. Our place is so small that an all day fire is only required on the very coldest days.

If I lived in a colder climate, more than practical though.
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Old 11-03-2012, 04:31 PM   #364
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The masonry heaters do work very well even in cold cold climates, but I agree with A-Bone about the invonvenience of having to light a fire (2 when it's really cold out) every single day.

Ideally, I would like a masonry heater on one side of my chimney, with a large soapstone woodstove on the other. The masonry heater would have a pizza oven in it, I think this would be the best of both worlds, although super exensive

Here is a pic I took at a friends house a few weeks ago of one.
Not as pretty as the last one, but probably still close to 10k dollars to build.





On another note, I cleaned out my chimney a few weeks ago, and was pleseantly surprised that after 2 winters of burning, and not sweeping, I only had just over a beer can full of creosote.
I've been wanting to light a fire since then, but it's been too warm. Even during the power outage from the storm I was itching to light the woodstove to cook some breakfast on, but the living room was already 67 degrees.
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Old 11-04-2012, 03:53 PM   #365
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Originally Posted by Manuel Garcia O'Kely View Post
I like those big mass heaters but I do have a lot of questions about how they work during this time of year, when we need a quick fire in the AM and no heat later in the afternoon and evening.

I don't mind lighting a fire every AM - I make cartons of kindling and just light it up every morning. Our place is so small that an all day fire is only required on the very coldest days.

If I lived in a colder climate, more than practical though.
Shoulder seasons are tricky. Once you turn on the big masonry heater, you can't turn it off. Our house has good south exposure, so even in winter if it is going to be a bright sunny day I either skip the fire (and am a bit chilly in the a.m.), burn a short fire (which stillsometimes leaves me chilly in the a.m.), or burn normally and open windows as necessary. I tend toward the last option, as I like thefresh air anyway.

I don't have a problem lighting the fire(s). I burn softwood, since it is most available here, and the Tulkivi lights really well due to its design. Only takes a couple minutes, some newspaper, a handful of kindling, and one match.
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Old 11-04-2012, 05:08 PM   #366
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Oh, I see.

That sounds about optimum.
The Pellet stove is on a thermostat and is set to go on at about 5 am in the winter to take the edge off, then we get up and light the Defiant. Once fire is going, what we do depends on the OAT [outside air temperature].

The advantage of the pellet stove is that when it's tolerably mild it's easy to flip on for a bit of supplemental heat - it's got three output settings/fuel burn rates, and you can run it for an hour and when it cycles off, it's cold.

The downside to the pellet stove is that being electromechanical, it's almost mandatory to service it - we pay a pro to do this annually to make sure it's working properly - it's worth the insurance - and this year, the repairs fixed some problems we did not even know we had, including a bad igniter and control board.

I like being able to use both systems as they tend to compliment each other and both are renewable fuels - we get the pellets made from local beetle kill pine and our wood is also beetle kill for the most part, with some salvage oak and fruit wood.

The downside to a pellet stove is that it's loud - at least ours is. There are two blowers in the design, and I have found that even at the lowest fueling rate, the stove self-cleans best on high blower - the buildup in the firebox is minimized.
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Old 11-11-2012, 12:21 PM   #367
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Got home about 8 last night and decided that since it had finally turned cold (been dropping down below freezing at night) I would try to build a fire and see if it would keep the house warm enough against freezing temps outside. It was 56 degrees inside when I started, 40 something outside. So I did not turn on the furnace.

Took about an hour to get the stove putting out some heat using compressed sawdust logs with a fire I could walk away from. Before midnight I put on the third compressed log and went to bed. Got up about 4 AM and added a half log - the temp was 63 at the thermostat but warmer in the room were the stove was at.

This morning I got up and the fire had mostly burned down so I put another half log on. The temp was 60 at the thermostat.

I need to find a better way to transfer heat from the stove around the house. The ceiling fan moves the air down from the ceiling, but not between rooms very well. Each bedroom has a transfer vent above the door, but no fan. The master bedroom is next to the room the stove is in so it will be warmer, but I am sleeping in a guest bedroom until I get my big captains bed put back together (still unpacking stuff).

I think when it is cold outside like it is now I would need to have a larger fire than three compressed logs and use a box fan to move the air out of the stove room. I also need to do something about the large windows in the stove room is in - I am looking into getting window quilt type insulated roman shades for those windows, I know they probably lose a lot of heat.
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:39 PM   #368
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Masonry heaters. Ten tonnes of thermal mass (brick,stone )...
Cool concept, but not an easy owner-retrofit.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:33 PM   #369
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I need to find a better way to transfer heat from the stove around the house. The ceiling fan moves the air down from the ceiling, but not between rooms very well. ..........

.... I also need to do something about the large windows in the stove room is in - I am looking into getting window quilt type insulated roman shades for those windows, I know they probably lose a lot of heat.
Do you have your fans pushing the hot air down, or pulling it up? They should be set so they are pulling the warm air up. This "helps" the natural air movement rather than fight it, creating better circulation in the room.

Regardless though, I also have problems moving the warm air around my house, I have a very closed off house with separate rooms. I have to have my stove going for a good 24hrs before the rest of the house will get noticeably warmer. My next house will have a much more open floor plan.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:58 PM   #370
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Regardless though, I also have problems moving the warm air around my house, I have a very closed off house with separate rooms. I have to have my stove going for a good 24hrs before the rest of the house will get noticeably warmer. My next house will have a much more open floor plan.
My mom had a house with a stove & Magic Heat in the living room, and her bedroom at the end of a long hall on the windward end of the house. It got really cold in the BR, and roasting hot in the LR, so I took a desk fan and placed it at about the middle of the hall to one side pointing toward the living room. It worked: the cool air being pushed toward the LR brought the hot air down the hall.

Not a real sexy solution, I'll admit, but cheap & simple.
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Old 11-11-2012, 09:25 PM   #371
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Do you have your fans pushing the hot air down, or pulling it up? They should be set so they are pulling the warm air up. This "helps" the natural air movement rather than fight it, creating better circulation in the room.

Regardless though, I also have problems moving the warm air around my house, I have a very closed off house with separate rooms. I have to have my stove going for a good 24hrs before the rest of the house will get noticeably warmer. My next house will have a much more open floor plan.
It feels like the air is being pushed down (I can feel it from here) and I would think that is what you would want. I have seen these various air circulation "tubes" that bring hot air down from the ceiling.

I don't think the problem is hot/cold air exchange, the ceiling fan seems to handle that - it is moving the air from the large stove room to the front room. There is a large 10+ foot wide hallway between the two rooms and that area is open and it has the ceiling fan in it, but I noticed that naturally the stove room is significantly warmer than the front room.

The front room is the room I decided to make my living room with the TV/etc. and the larger stove room with the picture windows I am not sure what that is going to evolve into yet, but it is where the stove is and it is next to the master bedroom.

I am sure that a box fan or something can transfer the air between the two rooms, I just haven't unpacked everything yet.
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Old 11-12-2012, 01:59 PM   #372
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Originally Posted by Nailhead View Post
Cool concept, but not an easy owner-retrofit.


If you can build a brick wall, you can put together a Crossfire masonry heater.
http://www.crossfirefireplaces.com/
The core comes in precast pieces that are mortared together, then the outer brick or stone finish work is done. Enjoying a little bit of fire right now.



I didn't put this together but I ended up supervising the masonry crew that did (the builder didn't have a clue but his lack of reading comprehension was part of it ).
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Old 11-12-2012, 02:50 PM   #373
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For any Woodstock soapstone fans, they are working on a soapstone masonry heater that is an easy refit, assuming you can support the incredible weight of it. Come to think of it, it should probably be out by now?
http://woodstocksoapstoneco.blogspot...ry-heater.html
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:17 PM   #374
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If you can build a brick wall, you can put together a Crossfire masonry heater.
You bet-- as long as you have the footer already in place, or are setting it on a slab. I imagine there are a host of other considerations to deal with also that aren't coming readily to mind.

Notice I wrote "easy", not "possible".

"Easy"= Set the stove to required clearances. Plumb up & cut required vent holes. Set support box and interior & exterior vent piping-- brace if necessary. Light fire.

"Possible"= a brick-laying project in my living room with its 2x8 @16"OC floor framing.

With my particular house it would nowhere near as easy as simply building a brick wall. YMMV.
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Old 11-13-2012, 06:31 AM   #375
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You bet-- as long as you have the footer already in place, or are setting it on a slab. I imagine there are a host of other considerations to deal with also that aren't coming readily to mind.

Notice I wrote "easy", not "possible".

"Easy"= Set the stove to required clearances. Plumb up & cut required vent holes. Set support box and interior & exterior vent piping-- brace if necessary. Light fire.

"Possible"= a brick-laying project in my living room with its 2x8 @16"OC floor framing.

With my particular house it would nowhere near as easy as simply building a brick wall. YMMV.

I bet that frost heave is an issue in your part of the country also. Friends who live south of Denver say that their basement slab move 3" depending on the season. I agree that, in your case, the install would not be user friendly.
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