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Old 11-28-2012, 01:43 AM   #1
biker87 OP
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Question Poll: Reputation of slipper clutches!

Dear Adventure Rider Community,

I need your help.
Currently Im working on my final thesis in Germany at the university Ravensburg.
Im particularly interested in your opinion about slipper clutches or 'back torque-limiting' clutches to form an opinion for this motorcycles-accessory. I place this survey in several forums and hope you bikers can support me.

I thank all those who take 5 minutes time to answer my 5-7 Questions.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...X0t1Z1UzNVE6MA

In addition, I would like to discuss your views and opinions in this topic.

Thanks for the support, would be great if I get a lot of opinions for my final thesis.

With best regards
Florian
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:42 PM   #2
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They are very popular on Supermoto bikes especially for competition/racing. I'm sure there's some racers who don't use them but there are more or less universally fitted on Supermoto bikes used in competition.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:06 PM   #3
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I had never ridden a bike with a slipper clutch until I got my Caponord. Wow, what a difference, so much smoother going into a corner, sometimes I go down two or three gears on entry. Now I'm spoiled and want one on all my street bikes.
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Old 12-03-2012, 12:05 AM   #4
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The only thing I don't like about the back-torque limiter on the Connie is that it limits engine braking a bit too much for my liking...
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Old 12-03-2012, 08:49 AM   #5
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A slipper's not necessary for a streetbike as long as the rider knows how to downshift properly using rev-matching.
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Old 12-03-2012, 11:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
A slipper's not necessary for a streetbike as long as the rider knows how to downshift properly using rev-matching.

Kind of my thoughts as well.

IMHO, at best they spoil riders; and at worst teach bad habits that could be potentially life threatening. What happens when somebody spoiled by a slipper clutch hops on a bike without one, enters a turn "with gusto" while banging down two gears and then locks up the rear wheel? Hopefully they squeeze the clutch and save their ass -- at worst they highside.

I think it's cool tech, but it annoys me to see them being put on a stock Ninja 300.
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Old 12-05-2012, 04:17 PM   #7
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Slipper clutches are great and all bikes should have them. I've had several bikes with them and they rock.

However, I think their usefulness is limited on the street - track use is where they really shine - one less thing to think about on corner entry.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:18 PM   #8
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You see them on some beginner bikes (Ninja 300, some Ducati 6-series Monsters, etc.) because they reduce rear wheel chatter in the event of ill-timed/mismatched (beginner) or emergency downshifts. This in turn reduces the chances for the rear tire to break traction and potentially cause a loss of control and an accident in said circumstances. Of course those with slipper clutches can enjoy these benefits to the n'th degree while on the track. I've read some saying it can allow some more lee-way in the gears than normal clutch modulation alone which can allow one to stay in the faster gear when they couldn't before.

I wouldn't mind seeming them in any factory bike I may purchase in the future or having one in either of my current bikes if money wasn't an issue. I have yet to hear about any real disadvantages. If I hopped on a bike without a slipper clutch, I would ride it like a bike without a slipper clutch...Just like I did when I got on my buddy's SV650 with a reverse gearbox. It's not like I had any practice at that, but I was fine. Did I want to ride in traffic? No, but it wasn't that hard to immediately adapt to and that was a much bigger difference than having a slipper clutch or not.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:07 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciferMutt View Post
Kind of my thoughts as well.

IMHO, at best they spoil riders; and at worst teach bad habits that could be potentially life threatening. What happens when somebody spoiled by a slipper clutch hops on a bike without one, enters a turn "with gusto" while banging down two gears and then locks up the rear wheel? Hopefully they squeeze the clutch and save their ass -- at worst they highside.

I think it's cool tech, but it annoys me to see them being put on a stock Ninja 300.
Putting one on a small entry-level bike doesn't make sense, because there are no consequences for making an improper gear change. It hinders learning proper riding technique. After years of riding, shifting becomes instinctive, and one no longer consciously thinks about it, so a slipper isn't necessary.

Another downside is that a slipper doesn't allow bump or roller starting. It just disengages if you try to.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:31 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
Another downside is that a slipper doesn't allow bump or roller starting. It just disengages if you try to.
I'm not sure about this statement, can you clarify? My SV1000 bump starts all the time with a bad battery.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:39 AM   #11
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I'm not sure about this statement, can you clarify? My SV1000 bump starts all the time with a bad battery.
Maybe they made it possible somehow. I know that dry clutch Ducatis won't.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:03 PM   #12
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Never ridden one, but the new R1200GS coming out next year is supposed to have one.
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
Putting one on a small entry-level bike doesn't make sense, because there are no consequences for making an improper gear change.
This was right under your nose...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Myfuture_yourdebt View Post
You see them on some beginner bikes (Ninja 300, some Ducati 6-series Monsters, etc.) because they reduce rear wheel chatter in the event of ill-timed/mismatched (beginner) or emergency downshifts. This in turn reduces the chances for the rear tire to break traction and potentially cause a loss of control and an accident in said circumstances.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:45 AM   #14
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You misunderstand ttpete. He is advocating consequences for a botched downshift -- how else will the rider learn to never do that again?
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:52 AM   #15
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If the downshift is that bad, they'll still have issues. I just don't see the need to punish beginners for bad downshifts with a potential crash. I think there's enough input that you did something wrong even with a bad downshift with a slipper clutch that beginner's will understand to not do that again.
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