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Old 12-02-2012, 05:16 PM   #1
BrzGSAdv OP
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Talking Learnin' the trade...

Hi Folks!
I own a GSA and plan to ride it to remote locations where mechanical help won't necessarily be available.

Ok, I know these bikes are unbreakable () but I am also a bit of a DIY kind of guy...

So question is: where to find a good book/guide on BMW repair? I used to do a lot of work on my carburared 125cc back in the day but all the electronics, shafts, etc kinda give me creeps these days so wanted to be well prepared before taking any risks.

Any online resources? As I live out of the US web-based solutions would be optimal or anything downloadable (e-book) format...

Thanks a lot! ride on!
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:22 PM   #2
larryboy
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Go here:

http://www.jimvonbaden.com/


Jim knows what he's doing.


Edit: Oh yeah, lot's of good info in the hall too:

http://advwisdom.hogranch.com/Wisdom/

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Old 12-03-2012, 01:39 PM   #3
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Clymer told me via email they are finally going to get a 1200GS specific book out by next summer... Or was it Haynes... whichever one doesnt have a crappy book out already. I know I am a lot of help
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Old 12-04-2012, 09:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrt10x View Post
Clymer told me via email they are finally going to get a 1200GS specific book out by next summer... Or was it Haynes... whichever one doesnt have a crappy book out already. I know I am a lot of help
You changed your Avatar...can't tell what it is...and this time it does not match your UserName.
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Old 12-05-2012, 05:05 PM   #5
BrzGSAdv OP
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Thanks all for the help! Great resources! Looking fwd to that book!
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...work, work, work + kid + 2011 BMW GS1200Adv.
...wifey + 2007 Ducati Monster 696
...job + 2001 Yamaha XT600
1978 Yamaha TT125
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:12 AM   #6
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Haynes has just published a very detailed service manual for the DOHC R bikes. BMW has the reprom but you will need a computer with optical drive to read it.

Your most limiting factor will likely be which tools you can carry and have at your disposal in these remote locations. Any repair that requires a service manual to carry out is probably going to involve a tool you may not be carrying.

A GS911 combined with a smartphone is a very compact tool which is great for diagnostics while travelling. An electronic torque wrench adapter is another very compact tool which turns any socket driver into a torque wrench.

My advice would be a Haynes manual and review it before departure. Evaluate which tools you would most likely need and can be easily carried. Tear out the sections you feel may be needed and carry them with you in a duo tang binder. Or you could just scan the chapters you feel would be most relevant into your device.

This book should give you more than what you really need. Best of luck with your endeavours!
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:36 PM   #7
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Pete, sorry what you meant by "the reprom"?

Thanks in advance!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete O Static View Post
Haynes has just published a very detailed service manual for the DOHC R bikes. BMW has the reprom but you will need a computer with optical drive to read it.

Your most limiting factor will likely be which tools you can carry and have at your disposal in these remote locations. Any repair that requires a service manual to carry out is probably going to involve a tool you may not be carrying.

A GS911 combined with a smartphone is a very compact tool which is great for diagnostics while travelling. An electronic torque wrench adapter is another very compact tool which turns any socket driver into a torque wrench.

My advice would be a Haynes manual and review it before departure. Evaluate which tools you would most likely need and can be easily carried. Tear out the sections you feel may be needed and carry them with you in a duo tang binder. Or you could just scan the chapters you feel would be most relevant into your device.

This book should give you more than what you really need. Best of luck with your endeavours!
__________________
...work, work, work + kid + 2011 BMW GS1200Adv.
...wifey + 2007 Ducati Monster 696
...job + 2001 Yamaha XT600
1978 Yamaha TT125
Ride on!!!
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:59 PM   #8
Pete O Static
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"Reprom"

The very overpriced BMW service manual in a proprietory DVD format. They sell for just over $100 USD. Would be great if it were an app or something that could be mobile but you need a laptop and to add insult to injury, it must be a Windows OS laptop.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:14 PM   #9
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Nevermind I googled and found what the reprom is... Now question is where to buy it?

On books: Haynes has a book that it says works for GS from 2004 to 2009, I am thinking of giving it a shot though I own a 2011 GS. Do you guys know if there are too many technical differences from 2009 to 2011 models that would make this book a DON'T?

Some replies recommend owning a 911 tool, I visited the site, found it great, do you guys have any feedback (positive or negative) on it to justify (or not) the investment?

Thx all!
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...work, work, work + kid + 2011 BMW GS1200Adv.
...wifey + 2007 Ducati Monster 696
...job + 2001 Yamaha XT600
1978 Yamaha TT125
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:44 PM   #10
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what about Jim von Baden's DVD's? Available here for repair and maintenance. Not portable but right now I need instruction to start with...

Has anyone used them? Feedback welcome...

Available here:
http://www.hexcode.co.za/shop

Thx all!!
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...work, work, work + kid + 2011 BMW GS1200Adv.
...wifey + 2007 Ducati Monster 696
...job + 2001 Yamaha XT600
1978 Yamaha TT125
Ride on!!!
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:06 AM   #11
Pete O Static
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrzGSAdv View Post
Nevermind I googled and found what the reprom is... Now question is where to buy it?

On books: Haynes has a book that it says works for GS from 2004 to 2009, I am thinking of giving it a shot though I own a 2011 GS. Do you guys know if there are too many technical differences from 2009 to 2011 models that would make this book a DON'T?

Some replies recommend owning a 911 tool, I visited the site, found it great, do you guys have any feedback (positive or negative) on it to justify (or not) the investment?

Thx all!

You can buy the Reprom from any BMW dealer. I personally prefer Max BMW because you can enter your VIN# into their parts fiche. This works great because not all models of the same year are identical depending on which country your bike was made for.

http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fiche/PartsFiche.aspx

http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fic...2&rnd=08102012

Haynes publishes a book specifically for the 2011 DOHC.

http://www.nippynormans.com/products...10-on-hay-4925

Avaiable also at Amazon. Don't get the book for 04-09 as it is a different engine.

Yes, a GS911 is invaluable if you intend doing your own servicing and the JVB Productions DVD is also very good. Everything he covers is also in the Reprom and Haynes manual. Having sid that, if you are not very familiar with working on the bike, the JVB DVD does a great job of demonstrating the basic service requirements.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:40 AM   #12
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I see your a financial analyst,so as a DIY guy it takes more than a book & a 911 tool to properly work on a complex machine. Not trying to spoil the party but have you learned the basics of mechanical work & beyond,on motorcycles is a fair question? As a trained auto guy there's still things I don't know on bikes,even after many years riding & wrenching,e.g..
Getting to where you do the routine maintenance is quite doable for many "shade tree's" but as you mention repairs in the boonies-that's another level entirely. Maybe one step at a time?
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:23 PM   #13
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BMW - no user serviceable parts contained within.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:13 PM   #14
BrzGSAdv OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
I see your a financial analyst,so as a DIY guy it takes more than a book & a 911 tool to properly work on a complex machine. Not trying to spoil the party but have you learned the basics of mechanical work & beyond,on motorcycles is a fair question? As a trained auto guy there's still things I don't know on bikes,even after many years riding & wrenching,e.g..
Getting to where you do the routine maintenance is quite doable for many "shade tree's" but as you mention repairs in the boonies-that's another level entirely. Maybe one step at a time?
Used to do a LOT on old carburated bikes... Mine + friends in the good'ol days... Idea is not to substitute my local bmw servicer but be able to know what is going on if/when in trouble on the side of the road or at least perform basic maintenance... That should be doable, no? Ah.., analyst by trade, engineer by education... Hence the willto mess with stuff!
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...wifey + 2007 Ducati Monster 696
...job + 2001 Yamaha XT600
1978 Yamaha TT125
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Old 12-15-2012, 06:29 AM   #15
kantuckid
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Kudos to you! Doing maintenance on your own bike makes the "machine connection" all the more meaningful.The real trick is to know where you are in over your head & stop. I am old enough to have zero need to toot my horn but I do know from having been a tech teacher & lots of observation that many "think" they know something & they don't.As an e.g.,the 8,000 hrs of training I had were not something that you make up for with ownership of a good manual & in reality were only the beginning of me being turned loose to direct my own work, NOT the indication of mastery & experience. I was actually a trained mechanic before I commenced the apprenticeship, it simply being a route to a particularly good job. Keep it by the numbers , as they say in the military. I/we have 3 sons that are all engineers & from living with me they know the line not to be crossed, thus that's one of those times when they talk to Dad, not Mom , on the phone with the hands on questions. I used to work with engrs on projects in industry, me the greasy guy them with their slide rules(yes, slide rules) & as many of them were young too, we had lots of fun exchanges of info.. The ones that got their hands dirty at home were often the more enlightened in practical applications, the others were a source of entertainment for the skilled tradesman. With the web these days it can be both encouraging to try stuff mechanically & informative or disastrous.Enjoy!
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