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Old 12-14-2012, 02:48 PM   #511
mwalker
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I like it because its light weight with a good compromise on seat height and suspension and the perfect engine size imo.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:11 PM   #512
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Originally Posted by One67 View Post
I'm pretty sure you've confused "easy to ride" with "entry level".

CRF230's are entry level- steel frame, air cooled 2 valve engines, basic suspension, great for beginers and people who arn't sure if they want to get into dirt bikes or not.

Freeride's are easy to ride because they're designed to be that way- composite Cro-Mo,alloy frame
billet hubs, latest tech.engine tuned for torque, WP suspension.
For people who arn't professional enduro riders but still want a high level bike.
None of this is cheap or comes cheap.
+1 the freeride may be everything but not an entry level bike...
Many people still havent got what its purpose is and thats why they tend to compare it with MX and Enduro bikes, which is of course wrong...
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:19 PM   #513
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It is the same old thing - sell a cheap bike with cheap components, and folks moan about budget suspension and heavy weight. Sell an expensive bike with high-spec components, and they complain about price.

I'm glad to see a bike designed for folks who want a purpose-built, high-spec bike with quality components that isn't designed as a go-fast racing machine.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:54 PM   #514
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Quote:
Originally Posted by One67 View Post
I'm pretty sure you've confused "easy to ride" with "entry level".

CRF230's are entry level- steel frame, air cooled 2 valve engines, basic suspension, great for beginers and people who arn't sure if they want to get into dirt bikes or not.

Freeride's are easy to ride because they're designed to be that way- composite Cro-Mo,alloy frame
billet hubs, latest tech.engine tuned for torque, WP suspension.
For people who arn't professional enduro riders but still want a high level bike.
None of this is cheap or comes cheap.
I am not confused , just wondering how its going to play out in that segment . I like the bike a lot , but question the price tag . They wanted to get people into riding , but at what price ?
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:48 PM   #515
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The Freeride pricing discussions in the press indicates that in North America it will be $1,000 cheaper than a 350EXC-F. In KTM's world, that is cheap. Look at the cost of a new Trials bike from Beta or Sherco or whomever.

This is not a bike for the masses. It is a bike for people who are, or who want to become, serious, dedicated riders. It fills the huge void from the cheaply optioned Japanese Dual Sports and the race-oriented Enduro / MX bikes. It isn't perfect for everyone - but then no bike is.

You pay the price for light weight and high-spec components. It is certainly worth every penny based on the "value" of its components. It is even more expensive in Australia, and it is selling there; how well I cannot tell from my comfortable seat in the USA.

Given the interest that this bike has generated in the US, it will be a terrible shame (although so typically American) if it gets here and people don't buy it because of the "price". This is why some of the best niche cars and motorcycles in the world aren't sold here - the mispreception between "price" and "value" (a poor overall world economy notwithstanding).
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:05 PM   #516
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Originally Posted by STANIMAL View Post
I am not confused , just wondering how its going to play out in that segment . I like the bike a lot , but question the price tag . They wanted to get people into riding , but at what price ?
I think the "getting people into riding" thing is just sales blurb.
I personally don't know anyone who would slap down 10g just to lick it and see.

The other owners I've spoken to are generally older guys (30+, I'm 45) with a lot of experience who realize that they don't need 45hp for trail riding, a few have bought them for their wives, but after riding it want one for themselves
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:18 PM   #517
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I think the marketing pitch is more "getting people into KTM" rather than "getting into riding" in general.

The original videos that I saw from KTM were for "weekend riding" and "exploring", and showed folks unloading them from big RV's and from pick-up trucks. I think that the idea was that "less is more", and that if the bike is small and light, you can also take it with you anywhere that you go, and always have a supremely capable bike with you.

Original development versions were not street legal in the US, but all production bikes were upgraded so that we can ride "from trail to trail" on the street. It was never intended to compete with the Enduro segment, or even the US DS segment, the way I interpret the marketing materials.

Ultimately, though, none of this matters. If it strikes a chord in enough people and sells well, and people keep it for more than a few years, and demand remains stable, then it is a hit, no matter how we really use it.
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Old 12-14-2012, 07:20 PM   #518
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Originally Posted by Gryphon12 View Post
The original videos that I saw from KTM were for "weekend riding" and "exploring", and showed folks unloading them from big RV's and from pick-up trucks. I think that the idea was that "less is more", and that if the bike is small and light, you can also take it with you anywhere that you go, and always have a supremely capable bike with you.

.
So true. that's one of the main reasons I bought one. It goes on a rack on the back of my camper trailer so I can set up base and ride out from there.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:32 PM   #519
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i just dont get it

Like i sayd erlier......
I was very skeptic to 24 horse power....

But i think most off the people ho pick on the freeride should keep it off ,to they have ride it for a couple days.
if you understand the purpose with the bike and ride after that! i can say its dont have any competioners.
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Old 12-14-2012, 10:32 PM   #520
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Like i sayd erlier......
I was very skeptic to 24 horse power....

But i think most off the people ho pick on the freeride should keep it off ,to they have ride it for a couple days.
if you understand the purpose with the bike and ride after that! i can say its dont have any competioners.
You mean 30 hp. In all markets now.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:26 PM   #521
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The Freeride pricing discussions in the press indicates that in North America it will be $1,000 cheaper than a 350EXC-F.
MSRP is about $9,500 on those, right? So what, like $8,500? Hmmm, looks like about a... $7,000 dirtbike to me. Maybe $7,500 if it's street legal. Especially considering where they're making them and the fact that most of the components are just recycles minibike parts (nothing wrong with that). But the fact that KTM is making something that nobody else is offering, so Hoo-Rah! Hope they sell a bunch of 'em.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryphon12 View Post
I think the marketing pitch is more "getting people into KTM" rather than "getting into riding" in general.

Original development versions were not street legal in the US, but all production bikes were upgraded so that we can ride "from trail to trail" on the street. It was never intended to compete with the Enduro segment, or even the US DS segment, the way I interpret the marketing materials.
Street-legal in the USA? Just because it could be doesn't mean it will be, but damn, that sure would be nice.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:37 PM   #522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blakken View Post
Like i sayd erlier......
I was very skeptic to 24 horse power....

But i think most off the people ho pick on the freeride should keep it off ,to they have ride it for a couple days.
if you understand the purpose with the bike and ride after that! i can say its dont have any competioners.
For a go anywhere vehicle the only real competion is this

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Old 12-15-2012, 12:23 AM   #523
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I don't understand the minibike components comment. It seems to me that the bike has:
  • The KTM 350 EXC-F engine, detuned to 30 hp;
  • WP suspension - front (43mm USD) and rear: 4357 MXMA and 4618 PDS DCC;
  • Ground clearance 12.8", suspension travel 9.8"/10.2" f/r and a seat height of 35.2"
    • seems to indicate a real dirt bike frame, but with a 23* rake and 55.8" wheel base (a la trials bike);
    • including a "real" swingarm;
  • and from what I can tell, fairly high-spec brakes and rims, but they are 19/21 (larger rear = trials?).
Made in Austria (not by Bajaj in India).

Are these components from a smaller bike? Don't KTM's smaller SX-series have fairly high-spec components? Thus, I would not expect a lot of cost savings. I've heard that the radiator is from an 85cc motor. If true, does that mean that it is undersized or that one size radiator will really suit several engines? Switch-gear, levers, gauges, electrical system (186 watts) all seem up to KTM enduro standards. The gas tank is a bit small.

I'm not arguing the comment, but really want to understand the source of the concern.

Given the price of not only the 350/500 EXC-F (at $9.5k), the 690e (at $10k), and even the (low-spec) Husky TR650 Terra (at $7k), and given the low production numbers, $8,500 isn't all that unexpected.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:32 AM   #524
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Yeah, they use a lot of components that are either carried directly over from their smaller bikes, or are slightly modified versions of those parts. No concerns over here though. Was only saying that should help keep the cost down, compared to all new purpose-built components.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:39 AM   #525
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Yeah, I don't know where the "recycled mini bike parts" comment came from either.
The only parts that are out of the ordinary for KTM are brakes made by Italian company Formula, who usually make light weight components for mountain bikes.
The wheels are 18" rear and 21" front.
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