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Old 12-15-2012, 09:17 PM   #1
brandonmccann OP
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Bike for a short person?

I've been interested in an Aprila Shiver 750 but I'm starting to worry if it will be too tall. Now, the common suggestion would be to simply go and try it out but it's a 5 hour drive to the nearest dealership and I need to have some more insight before I spend the time for the trip.

The bike in question is a 2009 Aprilia Shiver 750. Although, I am also open to other suggestions. I'll be using the bike on the highway and around town, as my primary means of transportation. I weigh around 160 and my height is around 5' 4"/5' 5"

Thanks in adv.
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Old 12-15-2012, 10:16 PM   #2
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I'd say it depends on how good of a rider you are, and how comitted to having both feet flat on the ground. The seat on the Shiver is fairly narrow, so the almost 32" seat height might not be as bad as it would seem. But it still might be a bit of a stretch.
Here's a great comparison review, with the bike I would suggest you take a good look at-the Monster 796

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/28/843...on-Review.aspx

The monster has a half inch lower seat and is 50 lbs lighter. The Monster 696 is another half inch closer to the ground(a full inch lower than the Shiver), and is still a hoot to ride.

JustKip screwed with this post 12-15-2012 at 10:26 PM
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Old 12-15-2012, 10:18 PM   #3
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Google says it's nearly a 32" seat height. Not a problem if you have experience on bikes- if it's your first, perhaps start shorter and smaller (ccs).
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Old 12-16-2012, 12:39 AM   #4
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Google says it's nearly a 32" seat height. Not a problem if you have experience on bikes- if it's your first, perhaps start shorter and smaller (ccs).
Yeah, it will be my first. I know of a place where I can get some experience with it before I take it out anywhere crowded and my town is small so the traffic is weak. I don't think I should go with a smaller displacement though. I live right off the highway and the highway here is 75-80mph.

My pants have an inseam of 32 and drag a little when I'm not wearing my boots, which add about 2 inches to my height. Do you think I could get my feet comfortably on the pegs?

brandonmccann screwed with this post 12-16-2012 at 12:48 AM
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Old 12-16-2012, 01:28 AM   #5
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Yamaha makes one

You should look at. It is the FZ6R and has been made from 09 thru the present. The seat height is 30" and the weight is 450. I ride with friends that all have 1200's and I hang with them.

A second point-if your Aprilia dealer is 250 miles away from your home--that might be a PITA for routine maintanance and the occasional drop repair.

DONOT look at the FZ6. It is 2" taller. Think Japanese if possible-their dealer network is much stronger. GL with your search.
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Old 12-16-2012, 01:34 AM   #6
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BMW makes

A F800ST with the factory lowered suspension. If you had this model with the low seat--you could flat foot at a stop.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:52 AM   #7
Dave.0
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The seat height is manageable, but you'll be on your toes, and that is sometimes daunting at first. My wife is 5'5" and has an aprilia mana (31.5) seat height, and she does fine. We initially lowered it - with a different shock, and dropping the forks, but went back to stock height when she got more comfortable to get back some suspension travel. The shiver is a cool bike, an under appreciated gem of a middleweight.

So to sum up - you could manage the height, but would probably be more comfortable with something lower, at least at first. If you're set on the shiver, it can be lowered if you want.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:59 AM   #8
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I just bought for my wife a BMW F700GS with a short kit suspension and low seat. It is 5 cms shorter than stock serie.

Enviado desde mi GT-I9100 usando Tapatalk 2
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Old 12-16-2012, 06:06 AM   #9
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Maybe this will help you out. Compare the ergos of this bike to bikes you're familiar with. Then you'll have a better idea wether the trip is worth it or not....... http://cycle-ergo.com/
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:16 AM   #10
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Join the crowd! I'm 5'8.5"(used to be 5'9.5" but now old!) I have 28.5 inseam. I've ridden a long time, since 1963. Think of a horse as an e.g., when you are "up there" you are fine if you know how to ride, is the question-BUT!!! and its a BIG!!! but, on a horse you don't have to maneuver the horse with your feet, as the horse does it based on your instructions,whereas in city riding or when stopped in any situation on a bike YOU DO IT! Backing up at a stop when the axxhole in front of you decides to back up,;controlling the bike when stopped along the road on an uneven surface;moving bike around to par in lots & garages. Get a bike you can handle at least on tip toes & with 32" inseam thats many more than I can consider, at least if some are hard to lower for my legs. Some bikes are far harder to do so & can be pricey to do so. Others , like my 2003 BMW R1150R -it has the OEM "low seat" option. Some bikes have adj. seats. Many have cheap links for rear & forks can be easily lowered. Do what your doing and much research. I'm personally leaning toward a new 2012-13 V-Strom 650 which I will lower to suit me as it is too tall for me. Per the above comments-I can ride it just fine,(truth is some tall bikes are even more comfy as I have lots of knee/leg room between the seat/pegs) but when stopped the other issues kick in.
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Old 12-16-2012, 04:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Yeah, it will be my first. I know of a place where I can get some experience with it before I take it out anywhere crowded and my town is small so the traffic is weak. I don't think I should go with a smaller displacement though. I live right off the highway and the highway here is 75-80mph.

My pants have an inseam of 32 and drag a little when I'm not wearing my boots, which add about 2 inches to my height. Do you think I could get my feet comfortably on the pegs?
I'm seeing a few "red flags" here.
It will be your first bike, and only transportation? How much riding have you done? You're talking about a fairly powerful and sporty bike, with a seat height that will keep your feet off the ground. The hardest part of riding is low speed manuvers, starting and (especially)stopping. I always recomment starting with something you can reach the ground with, and with a fairly predictable power delivery....and that won't cost a fortune when you drop it!
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:14 PM   #12
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Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.

Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:22 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.
If you are going to have something as a backup, perhaps you don't need as large of a bike for your first one? Look at the Ninja 250 and CBR250 for great starter bikes that can keep up on fast interstates.

Also, I tend to feel it's a fallacy that motorcycling is cheaper than caging. You are going to keep your car (and insurance), and the difference in gas is more than offset by buying riding gear, replacing tires and other high-cost items, and paying for additional (and more expensive) moto insurance. This doesn't mean motorcycling is BAD- just that it's not necessarily cheaper.

Quote:
Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
Google doesn't indicate there is a lot to be gained from lowering. Some bikes are more amenable to that- the F650 is a great example. Other bikes (cruisers, Buells, Ninja250 and CBR250) start out at a short-person-friendly height.
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:39 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by tedder View Post
If you are going to have something as a backup, perhaps you don't need as large of a bike for your first one? Look at the Ninja 250 and CBR250 for great starter bikes that can keep up on fast interstates.

Also, I tend to feel it's a fallacy that motorcycling is cheaper than caging. You are going to keep your car (and insurance), and the difference in gas is more than offset by buying riding gear, replacing tires and other high-cost items, and paying for additional (and more expensive) moto insurance. This doesn't mean motorcycling is BAD- just that it's not necessarily cheaper.



Google doesn't indicate there is a lot to be gained from lowering. Some bikes are more amenable to that- the F650 is a great example. Other bikes (cruisers, Buells, Ninja250 and CBR250) start out at a short-person-friendly height.
I've looked at the ninja 250, actually what I originally had wanted. After looking around at what some people said about it's stability at highway speeds I was deterred from it. Also the fact that it might take a while to get up to 70mph. Where I live, there is no on ramp. I need to be able to get up to pace as quick as I can. Another thing is supposedly when you have a small bike like that and an 18 wheeler passes it has a lot more air buffering. The roads I'd be on daily..that's 80% of all that pass lol. Large trucks. I'd need the bike to be able to hold up to more than an hour at those 75-80mph highways.

The backup car wouldn't neccesarily be mine, but rather a vehicle I'd have access to; a family vehicle.

brandonmccann screwed with this post 12-16-2012 at 08:45 PM
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:47 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
I've looked at the ninja 250, actually what I originally had wanted. After looking around at what some people said about it's stability at highway speeds I was deterred from it. Also the fact that it might take a while to get up to 70mph. Where I live, there is no on ramp. I need to be able to get up to pace as quick as I can. Another thing is supposedly when you have a small bike like that and an 18 wheeler passes it has a lot more air buffering. The roads I'd be on daily..that's 80% of all that pass lol. Large trucks. I'd need the bike to be able to hold up to more than an hour at those 75-80mph highways.
Tall bikes and small bikes both have issues with air buffeting.

Look up Leon Bageman (sp), who has competed in the Iron Butt on a Ninja250 several times.

In any case, as long as you are under 200lbs, a Ninja250 will outaccelerate a family sedan and is perfectly comfortable for an hour at 80mph.
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