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Old 12-16-2012, 02:16 PM   #1426
mpatch
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Joined: Apr 2011
Location: N Colorado
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I usually carry enough tools to work on most anything on my bike but my big dilema is what good are the tools if you need parts to fix something? I have changed my tools to more of a rig it back together to get me somewhere that I can actually repair something. Added jb weld type stuff, bailing wire, zip ties, duct tape, bars leaks, super glue etc. and ditched a lot of wrenches/sockets that are of no use without having replacement parts.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:26 PM   #1427
LoneStar
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Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Texas Hill Country, Zip Code EIEIO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balkan Boy View Post
These aren't going to be cheep and I think they are 3/8, but if you really want to go minimalistic ...

http://www.beta-tools.com/catalog/ar...eta/__filters_
Dude that is cool!

Didn't see prices tho
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Old 12-16-2012, 04:06 PM   #1428
markjenn
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Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpatch View Post
I usually carry enough tools to work on most anything on my bike but my big dilema is what good are the tools if you need parts to fix something? I have changed my tools to more of a rig it back together to get me somewhere that I can actually repair something. Added jb weld type stuff, bailing wire, zip ties, duct tape, bars leaks, super glue etc. and ditched a lot of wrenches/sockets that are of no use without having replacement parts.
I think this is something often overlooked - riders carry enough mechanical tools to do an engine overhaul, but don't carry anything to repair a broken shift level or bungee cord a broken pannier to the bike.

And about 90% of the problems you have on the road are in two areas: tires and electrical. I've fixed tens of tire problems, and had three ignition switches fail on my or my buddie's bikes over hundreds of thousands of touring miles, but I've never had a serious engine issue of any sort. Never even had to replace a spark plug.

- Mark
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:14 PM   #1429
1Bonehead
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Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Marylanstain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
I think this is something often overlooked - riders carry enough mechanical tools to do an engine overhaul, but don't carry anything to repair a broken shift level or bungee cord a broken pannier to the bike.

And about 90% of the problems you have on the road are in two areas: tires and electrical. I've fixed tens of tire problems, and had three ignition switches fail on my or my buddie's bikes over hundreds of thousands of touring miles, but I've never had a serious engine issue of any sort. Never even had to replace a spark plug.

- Mark
This is so true
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:19 PM   #1430
team ftb
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Location: Lost in the jungles of Thailand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jesusgatos View Post
Have been using one for about four years now (purchased after reading about it in this thread) and it's still in perfect working order. Use my 'trail' tools to work on my bike, pretty much exclusively, so quite a bit of use. Little thing is deceptively strong. No idea how much torque it can actually hold, but have had to put a rag around the handle before on occasion when I would be cranking on a something so hard the handle (thin blade) would start to hurt my fingers. Can even remember slipping a cheater bar over it once or twice, and would guess that I've put more than 125ft/lbs into it!
Jesusgatos - Thanks for the feedback on the tool, sounds like you've worked with it awhile. As posted above I was looking for feedback on how it handles the adapter nestling in the ratchet mechanism. Does the adapter constantly pop loose when installing an extension and/or socket on the 1/4" drive adapter? I have visions of fumbling about all the time with the damn adapter coming loose from the ratchet mechanism. It looks like just a friction fit into the ratchet mechanism. Is this true? If so does it come loose often? I have never seen anyone post regarding this concern so maybe its a non issue but I would love some clarification. Thanks.
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:20 PM   #1431
team ftb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RidingDonkeys View Post
I haven't used the 1/4 adapter. I'll play with it today and report back.
Thank you.
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Old 12-16-2012, 10:16 PM   #1432
jesusgatos
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: on the road
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Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb View Post
Jesusgatos - Thanks for the feedback on the tool, sounds like you've worked with it awhile. As posted above I was looking for feedback on how it handles the adapter nestling in the ratchet mechanism. Does the adapter constantly pop loose when installing an extension and/or socket on the 1/4" drive adapter? I have visions of fumbling about all the time with the damn adapter coming loose from the ratchet mechanism. It looks like just a friction fit into the ratchet mechanism. Is this true? If so does it come loose often? I have never seen anyone post regarding this concern so maybe its a non issue but I would love some clarification. Thanks.
The 1/4" drive adapter does have a spring-clip that holds the adapter in place, and it's much more of a positive engagement than something like the magnetic hex-bit drivers. Still, it's about 50/50 as far as which pulls apart first (socket/extension or the 1/4" drive adapter). Hasn't been anything more than a minor inconvenience, but would be pretty easy to make that more of a semi-permanent fit if it bothers you.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:36 AM   #1433
team ftb
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Thanks for the insight JesusGatos, I'll be back in the states next month to stock up on some goods. Gettin some GB stuff.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:43 AM   #1434
BMW-K
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The comment about "how to repair a shift lever" etc. is dead on the money. The real types of repairs are the ones where the bike gets kicked over and something breaks...better to not be stranded than to worry about a dropped valve. (because by that point your ride may pretty much be over...)

I keep a length of wire coat hanger in my bag - it's been used for exhaust bolt replacement, and other "through bolt" replacements on the road where a bolt has rattled free.

Mini-Vice Grips are a good quick replacement for a broken lever.

My license plate contains four different bolt sizes and nuts - all sized as replacement bolts on the bike.

The other key is "KNOW YOUR BIKE". Know what bolts are sacraficial if you need them. If you can pull a rear passenger peg bolt to replace a failed bolt elsewhere on the bike, then do it. (*Assumes no passenger of course...)

We all know about zip ties, duct tape and epoxy-steel. Why not add 2' of safety wire? A hotmelt glue stick can be worked with a lighter or match. How about a bit of small velcro strap or lightweight cord in case a saddlebag fails or you need a bit more tie-down cord?

And don't ever forget to stash an emergency credit card somewhere on the bike or person. Worst case scenario in the USA today typically involves a phone call (*Haul Road only partially excepted) and a tow-truck and a flight home...
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Old 12-17-2012, 12:27 PM   #1435
ravenranger
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Joined: May 2007
Location: az
Oddometer: 1,520
+1

Biggest issues ever encountered in thousands of miles of riding were:

flat tire (had repair kit and method of inflation to at least get to the next little town)

rattled out bolts (had zip ties to temporarily re-secure)

improperly installed shift lever that had flattened the splines on the shifter rod (on a bike that I was considering buying and took out for a test ride out in the boonies solo - did NOT have my usual assortment of tools - no cell service - fortunately I had my multitool with me and was able to make a temporary pin out of a piece of wire that I found discarded by the side of the road)

busted lever (visegrips to the rescue)

broken clutch cable (pop-shifting to the rescue - thank god it had an e-button for dealing with stop lights)

adjusting chain (that one was actually an issue bc I'd just had new tires put on and the "mechanic" that put the rear wheel on MASSIVELY over-torqued the axle nut - ended up hobbling into a little town and had to borrow a torch to get the bugger loose - should have checked it before I left on the trip even though I told the guy to not over-torque - that's what I get for being lazy and not doing the tires myself)

an interior oil seal blow out (didn't matter what tools I had, it wasn't going anywhere at that point - yeah for extended warranty and towing)
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:34 PM   #1436
jesusgatos
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: on the road
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Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb View Post
Thanks for the insight JesusGatos, I'll be back in the states next month to stock up on some goods. Gettin some GB stuff.
Awesome. Let me know what you want and I'll set it aside. We're still running pretty small batches of parts and would hate to be out-of-stock.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW-K View Post
I keep a length of wire coat hanger in my bag - it's been used for exhaust bolt replacement, and other "through bolt" replacements on the road where a bolt has rattled free.

Mini-Vice Grips are a good quick replacement for a broken lever.

My license plate contains four different bolt sizes and nuts - all sized as replacement bolts on the bike.

The other key is "KNOW YOUR BIKE". Know what bolts are sacraficial if you need them. If you can pull a rear passenger peg bolt to replace a failed bolt elsewhere on the bike, then do it. (*Assumes no passenger of course...)

We all know about zip ties, duct tape and epoxy-steel. Why not add 2' of safety wire? A hotmelt glue stick can be worked with a lighter or match. How about a bit of small velcro strap or lightweight cord in case a saddlebag fails or you need a bit more tie-down cord?

And don't ever forget to stash an emergency credit card somewhere on the bike or person. Worst case scenario in the USA today typically involves a phone call (*Haul Road only partially excepted) and a tow-truck and a flight home...
This is the direction we need to take this thread. We've covered all the basics, but am sure lots of people still more useful info to share. Like that point bout a coat hanger, and I love the license plate tip.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ravenranger View Post
broken clutch cable
Instead of carrying a clutch cable for any specific bike, I carry a long bicycle cable and by using some quicksteelto create a cable-end, can improvised a cable for pretty much anything. I don't even own any bikes with manual clutches anymore, but it takes up hardly any space, and that cable could be used for lots of other things. One of my friends broke the chainstay on his mountainbike once, and used a shifter cable to tie the seatstays to the main frame so he could ride-out. Thought that was really clever.
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:01 PM   #1437
team ftb
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Location: Lost in the jungles of Thailand
Oddometer: 1,650
Regarding cables. I logged 585 hours on my last offroad bike through three countries, and who knows how many hours on bikes before. I have yet to ever have a broken cable and the reason I believe is that any cables on the bike are changed every few years out of caution. Same for chains. I have never had a chain issue. Is this because I always use fresh drive chains? Not sure, but they are always replaced once they reach 50% wear just to be cautious as i ride in the outbacks of third world countries. So may I recommend you not try and squeak the last few percentage points of life out of these consumables.

Here's a few bits I carry in my tool kit to jury rig repairs and get me out of the jungle.




Headlite - For when you break down at dusk and the repair takes awhile

towstrap - for when all else fails

Bolts - and nuts and washers that fit the bike not just look the correct size, stored in stiff plastic candy container

Epoxy steel - for fabbing everything from broken levers, holes in cases, etc

Spark plug -

Fuel line

Fishing line - thick shit for emergency tying off things, lashing logs together for bridges, etc. packs tiny

Multiple hose clamps nested in duct tape, used before to attach L shaped hex to busted gear shift end for a shift lever.

Stainless steel wire - good for lashing high temp stuff ie mufflers

Zip ties - Too many uses, I love em.

Duct tape - and electrical tape wrapped round my air pump.


I keep meaning to pack a small (4"-6") hacksaw blade but have not come up with method off carrying it that won't eat into my spares kit.

One of the best tools for fixing shit has been my 8" adjustable wrench. That tool is the perfect thing for straightening out bent to oblivion rear brake pedals and shift levers, beating shit back into shape etc.

Another zip ty saving things.




Reattaching rear brake lever to master cylinder when a rock busted things up. This mod held out for the remaining three weeks on this ride.

The awkward thing is not carrying the shit but understanding how to jury rig things to get you back home. I'd love to hear more on this topic.

JesusGatos - I'll be needing the bar end handguard bits at least and most likely a Scotts mount.
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:40 PM   #1438
japako
Studly Adventurer
 
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Joined: Nov 2010
Location: North Texas
Oddometer: 592
I like the turn this thread has taken. I only carry as little as possible and the do all material to get me home. It would surprise some riders what it really takes to make a repair.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:19 PM   #1439
mpatch
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Joined: Apr 2011
Location: N Colorado
Oddometer: 862
One that I had never thought of was some bars leaks.
My #1 tool other than basic wrenches and tire spoons is a real full size vice grips (not some cheap knock off)
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:29 PM   #1440
EduardoMas
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Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Of No Fixed Address
Oddometer: 402
Fasteners:

Obviously different trips need different spare sets. Donor screws aside, for long travels I stash M6 and M8 (12”) and a little hacksaw blade (use with visegrip) inside a bicycle tube and cable tie it sealed. 12” spans the width of my bike. They travel with the set of longish tire irons. Cut to length, add a nut and washer and voila, an M6 x 107.53 hex head screw, in the bush .

For shorter trips, alen set screws M6x35, M6x50, M8x(I forget), one each with washers, jam nut and flanged nuts attached. This way you have just about any “bolt length” I need.

The added benefit of the rod/set screw approach: If threads in aluminum cases are stripped, jam a set screw to use all threads at the bottom, use red loctite and then tighten with a nut instead of biting into precious little aluminum threads.

When overlanding I carry those little special things like a valve screw and jam nut (XRR), subframe bolts and an M6 tap, often the posse needs something.
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