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Old 01-17-2013, 08:04 PM   #811
Ulyses OP
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Good day, Bryce!
So where ya heading tomorrow... back toward Cusco, or southbound?
I'm going to backtrack a little bit back to Cusco and see if I can't find a slightly cheaper and rain free way to see Macchu Picchu.
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:10 PM   #812
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Originally Posted by Ulyses View Post
I'm going to backtrack a little bit back to Cusco and see if I can't find a slightly cheaper and rain free way to see Macchu Picchu.
I'm looking forward to how you manage it and your impression of the whole Macchu Picchu scene
Cheers!
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:32 PM   #813
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Just thought I would share a picture of last nights meal:

That reminds me... If you have the intestinal fortitude to try this, and if the McD's crave sets upon you again, then you should explore.

McDonald's is famous for creating at least one localized product in every country in which they operate. For example, in New Zealand they have what they call a "Kiwi Burger," which is your standard McDonald's burger, topped with a fried egg and a slice of beet. You know, most Kiwis consider beets to be cattle fodder, and they won't touch it. But anywhoo.

Search out the "national dish" at each McDonald's along the way??

Keep it up, you are doing us all proud. (BTW: I really like the bacon-wrapped sausage.)
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Old 01-18-2013, 06:32 PM   #814
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Update

Well, I just made it to Cusco. I took a wrong turn somewhere today and then couldn't turn back due to gasoline, so I ended up riding 375 miles total. I was freezing my ass of the entire time and I managed to ride through some really crazy storms, but I made it in one piece. I'm exhausted. I'm going to have to take a mulligan on tonight's post. I'll do it in the morning.

Cheers,

Bryce
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Old 01-18-2013, 08:20 PM   #815
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We'll be waiting...
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figures...my stud was rusty I played with my nuts a little and it cranked right over
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Old 01-19-2013, 04:53 AM   #816
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Bryce,

Just a heads up -- the bridge in Urubamba is currently open to pedestrian traffic only, due to a partial collapse. No signage anywhere until you get there. If you're heading to Ollantaytambo, Google Maps will route you via Hayallabamba -- that's a tiny, muddy dual-track that Hewby and I took yesterday. The locals say there's a dirt road from Maras to Ollantaytambo -- you may have better luck there. The track to Hayallabamba isn't bad, but if you miss a couple of turns you cliff out on single track. DAMHIK

I think we're moving on to Santa Teresa today, crappy rain notwithstanding.
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Old 01-19-2013, 06:03 AM   #817
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Bryce,

Just a heads up -- the bridge in Urubamba is currently open to pedestrian traffic only, due to a partial collapse. No signage anywhere until you get there. If you're heading to Ollantaytambo, Google Maps will route you via Hayallabamba -- that's a tiny, muddy dual-track that Hewby and I took yesterday. The locals say there's a dirt road from Maras to Ollantaytambo -- you may have better luck there. The track to Hayallabamba isn't bad, but if you miss a couple of turns you cliff out on single track. DAMHIK

I think we're moving on to Santa Teresa today, crappy rain notwithstanding.
Excellent! Keep me posted. I'm supposed to meet up with a couple of other guys today and head to Santa Theresa.......you wouldn't happen to have a .GPX file or some waypoints that could help with navigation would you?
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Old 01-19-2013, 06:36 AM   #818
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I have a gpx file, but internet is shit in the hotel we're at, and Hewby doesn't have BaseCamp on her mac, so I'm not sure how I can get that off for you. If you want pavement, I think your best option would be Calca. If you're ok with dirt, Maras is the more travelled option. We saw only a couple of herders on the tract to Hayallabamba. No vehicles. But it is only 8-10 km of dirt.

We're shooting for Santa Teresa today, dutch the bikes, and head to Agua Calientes tonight.

It just stopped raining here in Ollantaytambo, so if you go over dirt, expect lots of puddles and slick clay.
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Old 01-19-2013, 06:44 AM   #819
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If you do take the Hayallabamba tract, check out a sat image that Google Maps routes you on. You'll see two little lakes. One in the middle of a small unnamed village, the other just outside it. We went around the one outside of town, and that led us to the tract.

Once on it, you'll come across a stone-reinforced curve or embankment. Go past it, but keep an eye out for a track dropping down hard right. If you continue straight, the dual-track becomes narrower and if you see a mud brick structure, you've gone too far.

The good thing is if you look back, you see the correct tract dropping down in switchbacks. I didn't have any major issues with the KLR going through there, but Hewby's GS took a beating.
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:16 AM   #820
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Longgggg Dayyyyy.........

Day 95 (January 18, 2012)
Arequipa, Peru to Cuzco, Peru
Day's Ride: 376 Miles



Man, I hate riding in the rain, especially above 14,000 feet. And I hate missing turn-offs.

The night before leaving Arequipa, I picked up a late Christmas present to myself, transported to Peru courtesy of bubbletron's boyfriend, Scott.



When I had realized that my front sprocket was bad, I got on the internet and overnighted a new one to him; he was able to bring it with him when he flew into Arequipa to ride with bubbletron. I really lucked out on that; the one that Felipe had given me the day before ended up not working.

As I left Arequipa the clouds finally disappeared and I was treated to a magnificent view of the nearby volcanoes: Misti and Chachani.





The route I had decided to take to Cuzco was only 280 miles according to google maps; I figured that a significant portion of that would be gravel, which made me quite happy. The first part of the route crossed through the Salinas-Aguada Blanca National Reserve which was purportedly replete with hordes of wild Vicuña, a camelid cousin of the Llama.



I soon saw signs for Vicuña crossings:



Before long I came across the actual Vicuña themselves. This little booger totally ignored me and refused to cooperate with my efforts at photography. Despite honking my horn, reving my engine, and screaming at him, he blatantly refused to look at me.



I continued on and eventually came upon a massive traffic jam. Skirting along the shoulder, I soon came to the front of the blockage and found the reason:



Having a motorcycle is a huge blessing in situations like these. Instead of waiting with the other cars, I jumped down into the shoulder and rode past, hardly even bothering to slow down.

The views in the Reserve were spectacular. Riding along in high alpine prairies at 14,000 feet, I was treated to views of the nearby peaks which had been dusted with a light covering of snow by the previous night's storms.







Riding through the reserve I saw a number of dirt roads leading up into the alpine. I figured that I had enough time to spare, so I took a little detour in hopes of riding with some Vicuña, or at least just getting a little bit of dirt riding in.



I had to stop for picture time eventually....





After a while I decided to start heading back to the main road. I decided to follow a different route that I hopped would skirt northeast and reconect with the road, therby saving me the need to backtrack.



Eventually it dumped me out into a series of sandy/muddy washes and I had a fun time skidding around with my slightly worn Pirrelli's until I was able to jump back up onto the pavement.

Back on the main road I found yet another example of why it's not a good idea to ride at night down here: coming around a bend at 50 MPH I was brought to a double wheel skidding stop by this:



The road finally passed out of the Reserve and continued to climb to higher altitudes:



I began to pass through small rain showers and saw herds of domesticated Llamas and Alpacas grazing beside the road.



I kept my eyes peeled for the turn off to Cuzco, but saw nothing. Eventually I pulled over and consulted my GPS, iPhone, and paper map. With a mixture of horror and regret, I realized that I had overshot the turnoff by about 30 miles. I kicked myself for not getting a lat/long the night before and plotting it on the GPS. I figured that the route would be marked by a sign or at least be fairly obvious. I now realized that I wouldn't have enough fuel to backtrack to the turnoff and make it all the way to Cuzco.

This left me with the unenviable prospect of taking an extra day to get to Cuzco, or pushing hard along the alternate route and riding an extra 100 miles at high altitude through crappy weather. I did what most reasonable people in my situation would do: I chose to push.

As I still had about 220 miles to go at this point, I decided to break it up into 110 mile segments and only dismount after having completed a segment. The weather continued to be brisk and wet. Before long I noticed ominous dark clouds on the horizon.



As I got closer, I realized that this was a pretty serious storm. Crooked forks of lightning began stabbing downward out of the clouds and the wind picked up into a gale.



Once again I was presented with two options: pull over and wait for the storm to pass, or speed up, tuck in behind the windshield and blow through. I chose option two. Entering the storm I was immediately pelted by waves of hale and fat droplets of rain. Before long I was soaked to the bone and wondering if I had made the right choice; probably not, but it was too late to turn back now.

Eventually I made to the other side, albeit significantly wetter and significantly colder.

I continued to push hard and stopped only after I had made the 110 mile mark. Pressed for time, lunch consisted of an entire roll of Maria Cookies.



The weather cleared up a little bit and I made the final run down out of the mountains into Cuzco.



I pulled into Cuzco around 6:00 PM, just as it was getting dark, and went to the Kokopelli Hostel where I met up with Clean Watt (Dylan) and three of the other riders that had been in Ecuador for the new years eve gathering at Cayumbe. I was exhausted. After downing a large pizza and a few beers, I went back to the Hostel and crashed hard, despite the obnoxious hipsters pounding away in an impromptu drum-circle.

Ulyses screwed with this post 01-19-2013 at 07:27 AM
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:45 AM   #821
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I have a gpx file, but internet is shit in the hotel we're at, and Hewby doesn't have BaseCamp on her mac, so I'm not sure how I can get that off for you. If you want pavement, I think your best option would be Calca. If you're ok with dirt, Maras is the more travelled option. We saw only a couple of herders on the tract to Hayallabamba. No vehicles. But it is only 8-10 km of dirt.

We're shooting for Santa Teresa today, dutch the bikes, and head to Agua Calientes tonight.

It just stopped raining here in Ollantaytambo, so if you go over dirt, expect lots of puddles and slick clay.
I think we'll just take the fastest route to Ollantaytambo; looks like there is plenty of dirt between there an Santa Teresa. I think we are going to wake up early tomorrow and try and make it all the way to Santa Teresa in a day, ditch the bikes, then catch the train into Agua Caliente so that we can get into MP early the next morning.

If you are able to get on the internet tonight and can tell me what time the last train from Santa Teresa leaves for Agua Caliente, I would appreciate it. Also, if you are willing to hand jam a few of the lat/longs for the more important turnoffs, that would be cool too. Only if you have the time of course....
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:19 AM   #822
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We've decided to stay one more day in Ollantaytambo... The ruins look to be amazing here, and we want to check them out.

We're at the Hostel "El Chasqui", just before the bridge on the left. 60S/night
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:43 AM   #823
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My First and Largest Donor....

This one goes out to my first donor, who initially contributed $1,000 to the purchase of an old 92' R100GS that was eventually scrapped in favor of the Honda. He also spent countless hours working on the bike, adding modifications, and fabricating parts. Finally, he gave me tons of encouragment to actually embark on this trip at a time when I was dealing with some tough issues in my personal life, things that almost kept me from going.



So, here's to you allvincullumyork. Despite giving you a hard time, you're a hell of a friend and a great brother. Have fun back in Oregon. I'll try and get the bike back to you in one piece. "El Hermano" means "the brother" by the way...
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:46 AM   #824
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Max384,

Thanks for the dough man! Here's your slice of the tank:

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Old 01-19-2013, 12:23 PM   #825
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junkyardroad,

Thanks a ton man! Here you are:

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