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Old 01-16-2013, 06:40 PM   #61
Little Bike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mass-klr View Post
There are only 2 poles connected to the plastic corners on top and the ridge pole also connectingbto it. First time I set it up without instructions took less than 10 minutes.
Good tent. You'll get even faster at setting up.
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:09 PM   #62
Laconic
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You can get a good tent for a great price here;

http://www.eurekacampingctr.com/eureka/
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:33 PM   #63
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I picked up a Kelty Grand Mesa 2 on sale for about $75 from Dick's a few years ago. Aluminum poles, decent ventilation, and freestanding, so it pitches fast in bad weather. Newer versions have more mesh in the canopy, and they're only about $130. Weighs around 4lbs, and packs well on my SV. I slept through more than a few storms in it, and always woke up bone dry.



When I want even less space to myself, I have an MSR Zoid that packs up tiny. You can even pitch it with just the fly and ground cloth if you're tight on space.

Here it is with my Kelty Weekender sleeping pad.




Rain fly and vestibule.


Ultralight mode.


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Old 01-18-2013, 02:46 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okie Preacher View Post
Use it. Love it.

It isn't light. It isn't small. It isn't free-standing. It takes a large campsite to set it up.

But it is absolute heaven to live out of on the road. Whether or not you park the bike in the vestibule is beside the point. It is great to have all your gear dry and inside...and be able to gear up without rolling around on the ground.
I appreciate the report. Outward appearances suggest it would be perfect but is great to get an opinion from someone who has actually used one. Thank you!
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Old 01-18-2013, 06:13 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mass-klr View Post
To everyone doing a lot of motorcycle camping,

Am going to spend a week in the summer riding in VT and camping at night. I need to get a tent but do not know what to get. Are the cheaper Walmart tents ok for this or do I need to go a little higher like the REI tents. I don't want to be wet if it rains but don't want to spend too much for a maybe once a year tent.

Any suggestions?
http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/sho...08_10000001_-1_

Send it to your door for $150.00
Brand new, used one night.
Went to the trees.................hammock camping.
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Old 01-20-2013, 08:06 PM   #66
hammerhoot
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I have had good luck with my 2 person dome tent from Bass Pro Shops
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Old 01-21-2013, 09:44 AM   #67
DirtyBlackIrish
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Hilleberg Tents

Although I am new to adventure riding and even riding in general, a tent is like you castle and comfort is usually paramount if you will be spending any significant time inside. I have been doing outdoor activities requiring me to bring my own shelter since I was about 10 or 11. In the Marines I realized I could survive anywhere without comfortable shelter. After I got out I used a bivy for many years. Even in the snow in high alpine areas down to - degree F. But I was just surviving. There was no comfort other than being warm and dry. I switched from that mindset some years latter when my girlfriend wanted to get an actual tent. Once I got used to the comfort and function of the tent I would certainly never go back.

All that said, I've used cheap, expensive, small, large and any other type of tent in just about every condition. My conclusions are as follows:

  1. Cheap tents work but not as good as quality tents and there are no quality cheap tents, period.
  2. Get a tent large enough to keep you, the people you will have in the tent, and all the gear you need to keep dry or safe.
  3. You will always appreciate extra room, realistically, and you will never appreciate less room while in the tent.
  4. If you will spend any amount of time in anything wet, and you likely will, get the best waterproof tent you can.
  5. Get a tent that can be set up while in a storm and will remain dry.
  6. Get a proven tent design that isn't to complicated to setup when you're tired, sick, frustrated, etc...
  7. You will likely need more than one tent if you have more than one type of main activity you want to use it for.
There are any number of tent makers that make a quality tent for all types of different environments and uses. The tent maker I prefer for everything I have come across is Hilleberg. They cost, but it is a lifetime tent you can pass if you desire and it just simply won't let you down.


http://hilleberg.com/
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Old 01-24-2013, 06:10 AM   #68
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Looks like a good choice, mass-klr.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patch View Post
The difference between a 5lb and a 7lb tent won't affect your bike at all but your wallet will feel the difference.
While your 2lbs won't affect your bike at all, the difference between a 5lb tent and a 7lb tent may be a 40% increase in packed volume. For me, reducing packed volume has been a great improvement even though my bulky gear hasn't weighed that much.

The difference may also be a thicker floor that's more durable, packs to a similar size, and lets you carry a lighter footprint for underneath it.

As for set-up volume, I bring in only some clothes, riding gear, and sleeping gear. All the rest stays on the bike no matter if I'm using hard luggage or soft. (The food and cook gear almost always go up a tree.)
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Old 01-24-2013, 01:58 PM   #69
Okie Preacher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtyBlackIrish View Post
Although I am new to adventure riding and even riding in general, a tent is like you castle and comfort is usually paramount if you will be spending any significant time inside. I have been doing outdoor activities requiring me to bring my own shelter since I was about 10 or 11. In the Marines I realized I could survive anywhere without comfortable shelter. After I got out I used a bivy for many years. Even in the snow in high alpine areas down to - degree F. But I was just surviving. There was no comfort other than being warm and dry. I switched from that mindset some years latter when my girlfriend wanted to get an actual tent. Once I got used to the comfort and function of the tent I would certainly never go back.

All that said, I've used cheap, expensive, small, large and any other type of tent in just about every condition. My conclusions are as follows:

  1. Cheap tents work but not as good as quality tents and there are no quality cheap tents, period.
  2. Get a tent large enough to keep you, the people you will have in the tent, and all the gear you need to keep dry or safe.
  3. You will always appreciate extra room, realistically, and you will never appreciate less room while in the tent.
  4. If you will spend any amount of time in anything wet, and you likely will, get the best waterproof tent you can.
  5. Get a tent that can be set up while in a storm and will remain dry.
  6. Get a proven tent design that isn't to complicated to setup when you're tired, sick, frustrated, etc...
  7. You will likely need more than one tent if you have more than one type of main activity you want to use it for.
There are any number of tent makers that make a quality tent for all types of different environments and uses. The tent maker I prefer for everything I have come across is Hilleberg. They cost, but it is a lifetime tent you can pass if you desire and it just simply won't let you down.


http://hilleberg.com/
Spoken like there is some experience to back it up. Well said.
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Old 01-24-2013, 08:13 PM   #70
oclv454
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Lots of good suggestions here. I did a two month motorcycle trip from Lake Tahoe to Alaska and back last summer. I spent 54 nights in my tent. Another consideration that I want to mention is the length of the poles. I had Aluminum panniers on my F800GS and wanted a tent that would fit across the seat and not prevent me from opening the lids of the boxes. Have a fun trip to VT.
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Old 01-24-2013, 08:47 PM   #71
Adios Pantalones
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSBS View Post
...Your most wisely spent money will be in your choice of sleeping pad and sleeping bag, regardless of the tent you select.

In a cold hard rain I could be really comfortable on my 3.5" thick Downmat sleeping pad and 0º down bag even if water were puddling on the tent floor of a cheap tent. But in the same weather it could be miserable in a $500 tent with a poor sleeping pad/sleeping bag. Just sayin'...
+1

The other thing not mentioned in this thread is noise. A better quality tent will be much, much quieter in the wind.
Nothing worse than a cheap tent flapping away all night and keeping you awake.

As mentioned above, a quality pad and bag is mandatory.

NOTHING on your trip will be fun if you aren't rested.
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Old 01-24-2013, 08:56 PM   #72
DirtyBlackIrish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adios pantalones View Post
+1

the other thing not mentioned in this thread is noise. A better quality tent will be much, much quieter in the wind.
Nothing worse than a cheap tent flapping away all night and keeping you awake.

As mentioned above, a quality pad and bag is mandatory.

Nothing on your trip will be fun if you aren't rested.
+2
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:33 PM   #73
DirtyBlackIrish
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Some Videos on Solo Tents

Here are my two favorite solo tents. This guy does a good job reviewing the pertinents. I like and own the Akto because its size and have used it in the absolute worst weather you can get. I mean two weeks of Washington downpour. I the snow up at high camp. Snowshoeing trip through the enchantments. That said, now that I'm on a bike I would buy the Soulo because it stands up on its own if your in a real hard pan location or on straight rock.

http://youtu.be/yEfmzI1tO6I

http://youtu.be/EP2OJVqz7rc
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Old 01-24-2013, 09:59 PM   #74
DirtyBlackIrish
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Two Person Tent

Here is a good two person tent.

http://youtu.be/Qc-oAr3ptm0
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:30 PM   #75
burmbuster
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Just ordered a Marmont Astral 2 tent with foot print. $100 off from REi on sale. 3 season with dual vestibules and dual doors. Seemed like a great deal.
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