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Old 01-18-2013, 09:48 PM   #31
Head2Wind
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It is possible to mount the OEM fan diverter/shield to a ADVmachines rally fan with mild modification. The part is fairly inexpensive at $4.59 USD.

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Old 01-20-2013, 11:25 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maoule View Post
WTF? I think I'd like to know more, please expand.
http://www.evanscooling.com/

This stuff gets used in a lot of heavy diesel engines,, commercial rigs etc..

The big advantage that tempts me is that you can use a non pressure radiator cap.
So the cooling system has zero pressure in it.. That should reduce load on seals and
reduce the potential for gasket failure.

Stuff is expensive, but we don't need much..... :)

Dave

ADD: LOL see a few others answered.. Should a read farther.. All good information...
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:50 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zeropoint View Post
I put the BDCW second fan and Rally Raid thermostatic fan switch on for a long trip to Italy last summer. Turns out it was their hottest for about 10 years and stayed in the high 30s, low 40s for most of the time. Phew. I reverted to the stock fan switch half way through as the fans were coming on too much of the time for my liking. The OEM fan has a shield that helps divert the blown hot air away from you. The second fan does not and blew the air straight at my leg.....


Billy D can vouch for the heat. We bumped into each other a couple of times in the same afternoon in Tuscany after a good lunch at Volpaia. Hey Billy how goes ?

Tim
It was indeed very hot in Tuscany when we bumped into Tim and Lucca. What a great place to ride.

Hey, Tim, looks like we'll be renting dualsports and doing off-road in Sardinia the last week of June. Alternately, come over here and ride some desert. I just picked up a guest bike. Then we could do some real fan testing.
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Old 01-22-2013, 09:42 AM   #34
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Sardinia will be fun Bill ! Never ridden there myself but been on foot a few times. Thanks again for the invite for proper fan testing. one day hopefully.

Luca and I are just starting to plot a possible adventure tour out to the black sea and back this spring. I'll try and post a ride report here if anything comes of it.

Anyway back to fans......

Have fun.
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Old 01-22-2013, 02:57 PM   #35
Hondo
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I don't think that I would want a unpressurized cooling system on my 990 ADV.

When pressure increases, boiling point decreases and visa-versa.

By eliminating the pressure aspect of the cooling system you are reducing it's ability to perforn under the most harsh of conditions.

Now add in a high altitude enviroment and this will further reduce the boilover temperature.

A no-pressure system might work on static machine with very efficient radiators & cooling fans, but on a water cooled bike at slow speed I don't think that it would work well.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:33 PM   #36
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Wrong way around - increased pressure increases boiling point, reduced air pressure decreases boiling point. Which is why you can only have a luke warm cup of tea on top of Mt Everest. And which is why the increased pressure of a pressurized cooling system raises the boiling point so you reduce the chance of your cooling system boiling (which is where it loses it's efficiency). However if the liquid in your cooling system doesn't boil (or already has a very high boiling point) than this a moot point - you don't need any pressure to increase the already high boiling temp.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:37 PM   #37
Hondo
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I stand corrected- my terminology was backwards, but that's what I meant.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:39 PM   #38
Hondo
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Corrected-

When pressure increases, boiling point increases and visa-versa.

By eliminating the pressure aspect of the cooling system you are reducing it's ability to perform under the most harsh of conditions.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:42 PM   #39
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I've never converted any of my bikes to Evens, but have considered it due to its requirement in Rotax engines used in lots of homebuilt aircraft...


Read up on it if you like...


http://www.evanscooling.com/news/pre...craft-engines/



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Old 01-22-2013, 07:44 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondo View Post
I stand corrected- my terminology was backwards, but that's what I meant.

Also, the Evens Coolant has no water to boil at relatively low temperatures.. That's why you can run zero pressure systems at altitude.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:49 PM   #41
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Also, the Evens Coolant has no water to boil at relatively low temperatures.. That's why you can run zero pressure systems at altitude.
Interesting.

I wonder what the cost would be? Probably outside the norm for motorcycle enthusiasts, but no big deal to aviation.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:53 PM   #42
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Found this.............

Quote:
Evans Waterless Coolant:
Like I said at the top, I work at Evans, but I'm not just a paid promoter. I started using Evans waterless coolant while road racing in the 1990's when it was still legal for pavement racing. As I became more familiar with its properties, I put it in all my vehicles and started selling it at the track and online. Things grew to the point that my volume was getting noticed by the company. Years later, and here we are with a formula specifically designed for the powersports industry. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me tell you about the product that I believe should be in every performance machine out there. You wouldn't take the back off your watch and pour water in it; it's time to stop pouring water in your engine!

The high boiling point of Evans means that the coolant temperature won't go above its failure point. It operates within the same temperature range as conventional anti-freeze and is able to stay in contact with metal surfaces, even at stressful points like around the exhaust valves. Pump cavitation is avoided, as is electrolysis.

All of Evans' coolant formulas are non-corrosive and last the lifetime of the engine. If I'm rebuilding an engine, I will save the coolant and pour it back in the rebuilt engine. Evans Coolant doesn't freeze; we state that it will flow at -40F, but we have not found a freezing point. After lowering a sample to -60F without freezing, we decided to talk about its pour point like the oil industry does.

Evans Coolant is a patented blend of chemicals, most of which are commonly found in conventional anti-freeze formulas, and additives with no water. It is not a gel and will not turn gooey if anti-freeze is added to it. If something were to happen on the trail and you are forced to add water or anti-freeze, it will simply perform like conventional anti-freeze, no worse. Information on the web about poor cold weather performance of Evans Coolant refers to our oldest formula. The current formulas are approved for all weather conditions and are mandated by Rotax for use in their 900 series aircraft engines.

Evans Coolant has a high boiling point of 375F at atmospheric pressure. While it does not need pressure to raise its boiling point, we do not recommend modifying the system to hold zero pressure. It will expand 7% at operating temperature so you will notice some movement to the expansion tank, but it doesn't build pressure like water does. If you were to open the cap when hot, it shouldn't spurt out. A little might come out, like a tablespoon, but if more does, it is a sign that there is either water present or an air pocket in the system.

The added safety margin of the high boiling point will save the engine when conditions become extreme. Through an unintentional error that cut air flow to the radiator, I saw the coolant temperature on my road race bike go to 297F. The bike was still running alright, so we changed the oil and fixed the cause of the problem. The engine ran fine for all the races that weekend and then all the races at the finals at Daytona.

Evans Powersports Coolant is trusted by race teams around the world. I encourage you to go to our website www.evanscooling.com to learn more and see the interview with Jay Leno or stop by our Facebook page http://www.facebook....300949013264495 for a more personal interaction. When you hear about our Chinese business, you should know that we make the coolant in Pennsylvania and export it into China. Evans China has installed American made waterless coolant into more than 150,000 new passenger cars so far!
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Old 01-22-2013, 09:54 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondo View Post
Interesting.

I wonder what the cost would be? Probably outside the norm for motorcycle enthusiasts, but no big deal to aviation.

About 40 bucks a gallon so its cheaper than our motor oil....

Dave
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:08 PM   #44
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The only concern I would have is that if the engine is running hot for whatever reason - with water it boils and you know you have problem (albiet a problem that could leave you stranded!) hopefully before any permanent/actual damage is done, but with fluids that don't boil (or have very high boiling points) you could be overheating without knowing it and damage the engine.
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Old 01-23-2013, 05:34 AM   #45
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I just acquired a second fan, spliced it right into the first fan's plug, and zip-tied it to the radiator. Been running it for 1000km now, 50% of the off-road. All in about 30 deg C heat. I actually found I was getting to 5 bars earlier than before, and staying there, even once I was up and running at a good 60 kph Fans were coming off and on quite frequently.

I figured that when the second fan was off, it was actually impeding the airflow where it used to just go straight through once you go moving. When it heated enough, the fans kicked it, cooled it just below the threshold (which is still in 5 bar territory), then turned off again, blocking the airflow. So it just kept bouncing around the 'low' 5 bar mark.

Of course, I just noticed a fair part of my grill was packed with mud....that probably didn't help.
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