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Old 11-27-2012, 08:53 PM   #76
Gobius
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Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Oddometer: 125
Do you live anywhere close to a good Guzzi dealer? Hard to get much more soul than a Stelvio, and it meets all your requirements, too. First gen bikes (09-11) can be had in your price range - perhaps even a new leftover with full warranty.

I do love those 955 tigers, too.
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Old 11-27-2012, 09:39 PM   #77
panhead_dan
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- reliable: I am a newbie and I don't want to spend time/money in the shop. I like the SV because the engine is largely bulletproof.
- offroad capable: I'm not going over rock gardens, but it really would be nice to explore those trails, rather than driving past them
- two-up power: the wife and I combined are about 360 pounds and she is 5' 10 (I am 6'). I don't think I will be two-up more than a day or two at a time (though Mrs. Fish continues to surprise me) and more B&b/hotel than camping...
- affordable: I am loving the new Tiger 800 XC but the price is way out of my league. I am thinking $7-8k at the top end
- soul: I'm not sure how you measure it, but if you've been on a bike that has one...


I have put the Buell Ulysses on my list. I was thinking the V/Wee-strom as well, though its soul doesn't speak to me. What other bikes should I have on my list? Recommendations? Thoughts? Ideas?


Go back to your original post. Buell Ulysses.
I seriously love mine.
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Old 11-28-2012, 09:22 AM   #78
Climb14er
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Living out here in Colorado and riding all over the west, there are few dealers of Triumph, BMW, Guzzi around. And when you get off-pavement, it gets more necessary to have reliability over-ride performance or 'good looking status'.

I totally enjoyed riding the Triumph Explorer when I took it for a long test ride a few months ago. This was one smooth riding, smooth motor, nice handling and it had a certain sense of being a really enjoyable bike.

I've enjoyed the R1200GS but with all the problems with reliability and dealers scattered throughout the west, I doubt if I'd go that route, and this included the 800GS... which I like as well... but the reliability thing is a no-go.

Getting to Guzzis... great bikes... reliability... ZERO! and Hardly any dealers, competent or otherwise out west! My neighbor's Guzzi died FOUR times in three years. Each time, TOTAL breakdown and big time towing and repair. They were happy to get rid of that unreliable beast.

This leaves me with a Super Tenere. Very nice bike, totally reliable, tons of dealers and support, rides nicely though is not as smooth or refined as the Triumph Explorer.

If I can find a low mileage S10 at a low/reasonable price, I'd buy it.

Looking at a few Wee-Stroms... ok... reliable, relatively inexpensive... lacking a little 'pizzaz'. But this can be over-looked.

I'm going to take a serious look at the Explorer XC in the spring, if I don't find a bike by then.

I've got a fine road bike for now.
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Old 01-28-2013, 04:19 PM   #79
FishrCutB8 OP
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Still reading a boatload on this site. It's like a library for adventure riding.

I have pretty much boiled it down to:
- Multistrada 1100 S which looks to have incredible handling and solid reliability. My understanding is this model goes 15k between valves,as opposed to 7500 on the DS 1000? Two thoughts. First, how much of a bank-breaker is the 15k service and second, is that the kind of thing one can do for oneself? It seems a lot of people have learned to do the valve work on the MTS themselves?
- Buell Ulysses, which are popping up with low miles in my range and below. From what I have seen, there is a big difference/improvement in bearings in the 2008 models and later. Also, the general thought seems to be to get an extra belt, just for peace of mind, and learn how to change it, just for peace of mind....Thoughts?
- Tiger 955 which seem awfully rare in clean, low mile condition (though I just saw one pop up on this site...on the wrong coast). Reliability-wise, people either love them or hate them, though most seem solidly in the love camp.


Still having a great time reading thoughts and reviews, but I really prefer this site as it gives real-life ownership perspectives as opposed to mag articles which seem to have simply cut-and-pasted the dealer specs...

Looking forward to Spring when I can actually get out and ride. And make a decision.
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Old 01-28-2013, 11:00 PM   #80
BryanCO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishrCutB8 View Post
Still reading a boatload on this site. It's like a library for adventure riding.

I have pretty much boiled it down to:
- Multistrada 1100 S which looks to have incredible handling and solid reliability. My understanding is this model goes 15k between valves,as opposed to 7500 on the DS 1000? Two thoughts. First, how much of a bank-breaker is the 15k service and second, is that the kind of thing one can do for oneself? It seems a lot of people have learned to do the valve work on the MTS
I do my own service. Valve checks are certainly within the realm of a weekend mechanic. Replacing or adjusting shims gets a bit more complicated but the need seems to be infrequent. An option is to tear the bike down (the tank has to come off for air filter and vale access) and have a local independent check the valves.

My '06 S has 37k and I've done all of the maintenance - short of fork and shock rebuilds.
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:07 AM   #81
panhead_dan
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RE: Buell belt changing thoughts;
Once you are familiar with the procedure, it's about a 30 minute job. Best bet is to install a new belt while the old one is still in good shape and save the old one as a spare. You will notice that the new belt is a tight fit but that the procedure is straight forward and easy. When and if the need arises to ever change the belt again, the old belt will be much easier because it's not as tight due to a bit of break in stretching.
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Old 01-29-2013, 04:16 PM   #82
Hatley Rocket
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FishrcutB8,

I think if you like your SV1000, you'll love a DL1000. If your already intoxicated by Suzuki's v-twin, the natural progression would be to move that motor into a different chassis, the V-Strom. I had bought a new strom in '03(1000cc) and I really did love it. Very narrow, and light feeling, decent gas tank, great ergonomics. They are stone reliable, don't mistake reliability with lack of "soul". There is something to be said, especially if it is your one and only bike, for turn-key reliability, gas and go or however you want to put it. They are fine machines, and they are fun to ride. Riding off paved road, take it easy and enjoy the scenery. Want to enjoy some curves, turn up your preload(adjustable front and rear) then rev it up and go. Nice V-stroms with low mileage can still be found, and your almost in the ballpark for a new leftover '12. Fuel injected, six speed, just like your sv. Just more upright, a bit more suspension travel(6.3" front and rear) and a bit more passenger friendly. Under seat access is easy, with some storage there also, and if you get an '03 or later, you get a decent alternator to power accesories too. Just don't bother with lights. The stock V-strom lights are like staring into the sun. You can wheelie one too. Around 15K valve adjustment intervals. Givi/Kappa made luggage for them available from Suzuki. Many used ones come with saddlebags already. Handguards, luggage rack standard.

If you find a good deal on a multistrada, it too has a 90 degree v-twin, and being a ducati I'm sure they are a hoot to ride and it probably sounds like sin. I have no experience with them. They had available factory hard luggage, and a handy storage bin under one of the fairing sides. High style, and low tech motor? I can be wrong here, but I mean simple to work on, valve adjustment intervals are more frequent, but you should be able to do them yourself. There is a beautiful red one for sale currently in the flea market for around $5K. Try to get one with factory luggage. They are pretty. They probably sound like sin too.

All that being said. I just bought a 2001 Tiger 955i. Unusual triple motor with distincive growl. No 90 degree twin here. If you like the 800XC, but cannot afford the price, just go back, timewise and get an older 955i. I got mine with about 7300 miles on it. Low mile ones are hard to find. I didn't even get a mile on mine, due to weather, but I have ridden my friends. Slightly tighter ergonomics than the V-strom. Valve adjustments 12K miles apart. You can do them yourself, you just need to take the tank and airbox off first. Easy eccentric chain adjusters on older models, spoke wheels too. They have a bit more suspension travel than the V-strom. No room for anything really under the seat. Front suspension non-adjustable, rear preload, with a wrench, under the seat. The '05 and '06 came with factory luggage, so that is a start for touring. More horsepower than the big strom. I got one in roulette green. I looked for a tiger on craiglist, and FM, ebay and cycletrader, but had the most luck with google. Just typed in "Roulette green tiger 955i for sale" and up popped the add that I eventually made the deal on. Fuel injected, six speed. More style than strom, less i'm sure than multistrada. Sitting on it makes me fell a little, you know, fancy. Handguards, luggage rack, power outlet standard. I bought the Tiger because, I never had one before, a friend of mine has one, and it was the least expensive adventure bike I could find for year/mileage. They are a bargain. Had I found a less mileage and less expensive '03 or newer DL1000 V-Strom, I just may have bit again.

I hope i have helped to confuse you just a bit more.

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=853249

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=ducati


T

Hatley Rocket screwed with this post 01-29-2013 at 04:19 PM Reason: links to FM
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:20 PM   #83
FishrCutB8 OP
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Ha - no, not necessarily confused. People seem to love the 955 though I am not necessarily inspired by the look of it. That being said, people rave about the motor and just how smooth that triple is.

Same thing with the DL1000 - really wished it looked as good as the new DL650, frankly. But, there is a lot to be said for the reliability of that Twin.


I just found out the. Is a really good Moto Guzzi dealer (Macchina Europa) near me as well...
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:35 PM   #84
Jeathrow Bowdean
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Sorry to go off topic, but something has me wounder !!!

I seen a-lot of info on setting valves on many of the posts. Johnofchair from V Strom International sets his valves on his DL 1000 in the middle ground, and he does not have to touch them very often. I will chat with him towmorrow to see what his intervals are, My book suggests that I do mine at 15 000 to 18 000 kms, but I went past this mark to 22 000 kms, and I hope I didn't wreck any thing on my wee.

I run at 3700 to 5700 RPM's, but I don't run above the 6500 RPM range very offten. I have gone past this range, 3 or 4 times for short short stints, but I'm sure it never damaged any thing.

John said that the exshust valves seem to be the ones that need the most a-tention, and his in-take valves don't wear very much, so he sets them in this middle ground, and that way he can run a long time with out checking them on all of these intervals like the book says.

Someone asked about longevity of the V Strom, and we have one fellow who is past the 230 000 mile mark on a 2002 DL 1000. And he has many reports that he has posted from day 1. All the services and work overs. Oil changes, drive chains, sprockets, rear shock repair, brakes, a few bearings, and a few other small things. And he is still going strong with out any motor work except for valves.

From Jeathrow Bowdean in Western Canada PS: I will chat with John to see what he has to say about these valves. and when they need setting if a person puts them in this middle ground that he was talking about.
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:01 AM   #85
Forseti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishrCutB8 View Post

I just found out the. Is a really good Moto Guzzi dealer (Macchina Europa) near me as well...
I love my Stelvio. Easy to maintain. Good 2up. Lots of character. Love the motor! I take it damn near anywhere.
It is heavy. Caries it well but yea it is heavy.

Real good on long hi-way tours for multiple hours. Good on dirt roads/logging/fire roads (with proper tires of course) even ok on two track but will need to run slower than you would on a wr250 or some such. Avoid swamps etc.

Easy maint. do it yourself valves etc. fluids every 10K and that's it.

If you are like most people the amount of real off road you end up actually doing will be less than originally thought unless you go with a small streetable dirt bike like a wr250 that will suck 2up.

If you want a bike with soul I would not suggest the DL. Good do it all bike but tends to be rather... shall we say uninspiring to ride. The Ducati?? Blast to ride and lots a power and capable I am sure, but I find the riding position too tight. (I'm 6'4") Tiger? well... the wife just purchased a 2000 so we will see... lol. Buel? belt drive and dirt don't mix well and the fan would drive me nuts, poor tire selection for dirt/road combination. GS? well.... IMO. The stelvio is just as capable but with more soul... and I think it feels better.... with no servo/canbus/final drive issues.

ymmv
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:58 AM   #86
Jeathrow Bowdean
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I just had a chat with johnofchar from Suzuki V Strom International forum, and the valve setting thing is over rated. The owners manual and service book does not say to set the valve every 7500 miles or 15 000 kms unless they need adjusting, or when your paticular make or model is due for this...

It says that you should " " " check the clearance," " " and adjust if the valves that do need adjusting, and in most cases, not all the valves will need adjusting on each cylinder. The middle ground is half way between the high and low spec, and if you set the valves more towards the high spec, you most likely will never have to set them again in most cases, and the word is "Most Cases."

Johnofchar has set his valves like this, and every once and a while he checks them to see where they are at for spec. It has been a few years from his last setting, and he has still to this day, has not touched them.

I don't know much about this stuff my self, but I like hearing this stuff from people who know. I'm going to set my valves on the high spec, and "Check them as recomended." I bet I will go many a years before I will ever have to touch them again !!!

From Jeathrow Bowdean in Western Canada
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Old 01-31-2013, 02:44 PM   #87
FishrCutB8 OP
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That would be my one knock against the Stelvio -- the weight. As a newbie, my fear would be the weight would be too much. I have seen that the weight is lower on the bike, though, making it easier to handle. I suppose a test ride could be warranted. :-)
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Old 01-31-2013, 02:47 PM   #88
FishrCutB8 OP
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JB - I saw the recommendations to check the valves, not necessarily adjust them, as well. A couple of the MTS guys on here have said they check them at the recommended intervals but rarely need to make adjustments. Looks like the V-Strom goes the same way...
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:37 PM   #89
Jeathrow Bowdean
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I to wish that they were lighter to FishrCutB8, but it is what it is !!! I have had good luck on my 650 wee on dry gravel roads and dry cut lines, but I'm not skilled on the wet or soft sand, so I stay away from that stuff.

I put on a set of Heidenau K60 Scout 50/50 tires, and I hope that it fixes the traction issue. I need 10 000 + kms for my highway travels, and a bit better bite if it rain when I'm up some dead end road. I plan on sticking to the 80% hyw and 20% dry roads.

I never asked johnofchar how many kms he had put on since his last valve setting, but I'm sure it has been a few years years. I check and see where the high mile dude on his V Strom DL 1000 2002 year unit.

PS: The odometors on V Stroms stop at 200 000 miles being that Suzuki never thought the bike would ever make it there. Ha Ha. I guess they were built it better then they thought !!! He had to have the dealer re-set the odometor, so he could keep track of his mileage.

From Jeathrow Bowdean
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Old 01-31-2013, 05:50 PM   #90
Geology Rocks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FishrCutB8 View Post
Still reading a boatload on this site. It's like a library for adventure riding.

I have pretty much boiled it down to:
- Multistrada 1100 S which looks to have incredible handling and solid reliability. My understanding is this model goes 15k between valves,as opposed to 7500 on the DS 1000? Two thoughts. First, how much of a bank-breaker is the 15k service and second, is that the kind of thing one can do for oneself? It seems a lot of people have learned to do the valve work on the MTS themselves?
- Buell Ulysses, which are popping up with low miles in my range and below. From what I have seen, there is a big difference/improvement in bearings in the 2008 models and later. Also, the general thought seems to be to get an extra belt, just for peace of mind, and learn how to change it, just for peace of mind....Thoughts?
- Tiger 955 which seem awfully rare in clean, low mile condition (though I just saw one pop up on this site...on the wrong coast). Reliability-wise, people either love them or hate them, though most seem solidly in the love camp.


Still having a great time reading thoughts and reviews, but I really prefer this site as it gives real-life ownership perspectives as opposed to mag articles which seem to have simply cut-and-pasted the dealer specs...

Looking forward to Spring when I can actually get out and ride. And make a decision.
The 1100S has 7500 mile valve adjustments instead of the 15,000 mile adjustments of the 2010 1200MTS. I had a 2009 1100S that I loved. I got rid of it because I didn't want to deal with the gas tank expanding issues. My tank had bubbles and was badly deformed. The fact that Ducati didn't replace it with a tank that was of a different design to prevent it from happening again was a deal breaker for me. It was a great bike that I trusted very much. I just hated the idea of having to replace the gas tank every 7500 miles.
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