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Old 01-30-2013, 09:27 PM   #1111
L.B.S.
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14.6 litre (3.85 gal) tank size?

... Isn't that kinda small?
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Old 01-31-2013, 03:25 AM   #1112
The other Ferret
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Originally Posted by L.B.S. View Post
14.6 litre (3.85 gal) tank size?

... Isn't that kinda small?

Yes unfortunately, however for most of us thats no reason to reject the whole bike.
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:12 AM   #1113
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Originally Posted by L.B.S. View Post
14.6 litre (3.85 gal) tank size?

... Isn't that kinda small?
Not to me. I've owned 9 motorcycles and AFAIK none of them had a bigger tank than about 3.9 gallons.

I know big touring bikes and big dual-sports often have huge tanks in the 6-7 gallon range but just under 4 seems pretty reasonable for a street/road bike. Even at 40mpg 3.5 gallons will get you to 140 miles or two full hours of riding at 70mph (and that's if you're "slabbing" it - if you're in the twisties you're likely to be averaging less than 70.) Most bikes in this class are capable of at least 45mpg and possibly more (my 885 Thunderbird was good for about 49 most of the time) so while the range may not be in the same class as a Gold Wing or and ST1100 it should be perfectly adequate for most "regular" riders.

And I don't know about you but I'm usually ready for a bit of a break after 140 miles or so. And even riding in our least populated state (Wyoming) I've never had a problem finding a gas station when I needed one (though it does take a bit more forethought than riding in more populated areas does - you learn very quickly not to pass up a gas station once you're over about 100 miles.)
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:44 AM   #1114
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^ So what you are saying is that if you are slabbing in remote areas you probably will be stopping every 100 miles or at the closest station to avoid walking? I want the bike, and realize that to most everyone the tank size is not a concern; but good grief, out west riding means one has to be constantly on the lookout for a station.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:24 AM   #1115
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Originally Posted by straightrod View Post
^ So what you are saying is that if you are slabbing in remote areas you probably will be stopping every 100 miles or at the closest station to avoid walking? I want the bike, and realize that to most everyone the tank size is not a concern; but good grief, out west riding means one has to be constantly on the lookout for a station.
This is an A D V E N T U R E forum.

There's a girl going alone from Virginia to Alaska on a 1986 Yamaha Radian with a 3.17 gallon tank.....
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831213
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Old 01-31-2013, 12:52 PM   #1116
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If you really need a bigger tank...


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Old 01-31-2013, 01:10 PM   #1117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jitterymonkey View Post
This is an A D V E N T U R E forum.

There's a girl going alone from Virginia to Alaska on a 1986 Yamaha Radian with a 3.17 gallon tank.....
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831213
On purpose?..Why, did she lose a bet..
If your idea of A D V E N T U R E is looking for a gas station..then you are covered.
Not a fail, but it would have been sooo easy to add 1 stinkin gallon. Would have completely changed the way you do a trip.
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Old 01-31-2013, 01:47 PM   #1118
The other Ferret
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jitterymonkey View Post
This is an A D V E N T U R E forum.

There's a girl going alone from Virginia to Alaska on a 1986 Yamaha Radian with a 3.17 gallon tank.....
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831213
Thanks for posting...great read. Tough girl!
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Old 01-31-2013, 02:06 PM   #1119
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Originally Posted by L.B.S. View Post
14.6 litre (3.85 gal) tank size?

... Isn't that kinda small?
I understand your point but it's not "deals off"small.My CB has a 5 gal tank and if the mileage is roughly the same the CB1100 should be about 120+ to reserve and then another 38-42 miles to empty.While not great touring creds it's ok for light touring and about perfect for my commute(44 miles round trip).I never get too "gotta get there" to stop every couple hours though.Just my style,not picking an arguement if you do big miles.With no wind protection I'm going to be ready to stretch every couple hours anyway.Loaded down,2 up,against a headwind could get interesting though.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:39 AM   #1120
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^ So what you are saying is that if you are slabbing in remote areas you probably will be stopping every 100 miles or at the closest station to avoid walking? I want the bike, and realize that to most everyone the tank size is not a concern; but good grief, out west riding means one has to be constantly on the lookout for a station.
Well, I grew up in Colorado and have been riding out here for the past 30 years or so. I've never had a bike that had more than a 160 mile (safe) range (I've gotten some of my bikes up to 175 miles before hitting reserve but I knew it was a fluke) and it has simply never been an issue for me. Most of my bikes would go 125 - 150 miles before hitting reserve.

If you are on paved roads, there actually aren't very many places in the Lower 48 where you can go more than 100 miles without hitting a gas station. Even in wide open, empty places like Wyoming and Nevada, there are gas stations at least every 70 - 100 miles on every paved road I can think of. And of course if you're on the interstate, they are even closer than that.

Here's just one example: I-80 between Rawlins and Rock Springs. This is a 100 miles stretch with no towns of any significance. And yet, there are at least two gas stations I'm aware of, one about 25 miles West of Rawlins, and another one about 20 - 30 miles past that. As long as you're not riding a Sportster with a "peanut" tank, fuel just isn't a concern as long as you stay aware of your miles.

Unless you're the type of person who doesn't even start looking for a gas station until you hit reserve, you'd have no problems with a 140 - 160 mile range (which I'm assuming the CB has.) In fact, I don't know about you but at the age of 51, I'm usually ready to get off the bike and stretch my legs and get a cup of coffee or a cold drink every 100 miles or so.

I'm sure somewhere out on the wide expanse of the internet somebody has figured out where the longest stretch of paved road without a gas station is but I'll bet it's not 100 miles unless you deliberately route yourself away from fuel.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:24 AM   #1121
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Last fall my wife and I were touring out west. We had come down 95 in Idaho to Lewiston and decided to ride the Rattlesnake 129 thru Washington into Oregon. As we headed up this neat curvy uphill outside Asotin, I believe, we saw a sign that said NEXT GAS 70 MILES. I was sure I could make it but still I turned around rode the 3 miles back to the last station and topped off. There was 5 Harleys in there topping off as well. Not sure if they had just come from there or were headed to there, but that is the only place I saw that made me nervous in the least.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:40 AM   #1122
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Originally Posted by ZappBranigan View Post
If you are on paved roads, there actually aren't very many places in the Lower 48 where you can go more than 100 miles without hitting a gas station. Even in wide open, empty places like Wyoming and Nevada, there are gas stations at least every 70 - 100 miles on every paved road I can think of. And of course if you're on the interstate, they are even closer than that.

Here's just one example: I-80 between Rawlins and Rock Springs. This is a 100 miles stretch with no towns of any significance. And yet, there are at least two gas stations I'm aware of, one about 25 miles West of Rawlins, and another one about 20 - 30 miles past that. As long as you're not riding a Sportster with a "peanut" tank, fuel just isn't a concern as long as you stay aware of your miles.
You make a statement above the frequency of gas stations on "paved roads" and then cite an example on the interstate. I'll readily agree with you that that a 120-mile range is Okay for interstate travel in the W but it's not adequate if you're exploring the backroads, even if you're staying on pavement. The following sign I encountered unexpected in N. Nevada 50 miles after filling up:



I had to completely change my route.

Another issue is that many of the stations in small towns are not open on nights or even weekends. And occasionally are out of gas. Or simply shut down unexpectedly. There is one station in the central part of NE Oregon I ride where the station has had three ownerships in the past six years and has been open/closed completely randomly. If you're depending on a station being available at 100 miles after filling and you arrive and there is no gas, you're completely screwed as you have no reserve to try and get to the next town or backtrack.

Final point. There are winds and mountains in the W. While overall you may be able to average around 40 mpg, you will occasionally have instances where your mileage will fall into the low-30's, many times unexpectedly. With a 3.9 gallon tank, you can't depend on 3.9 gallons or even 3.5. To be reasonably conservative, you can only depend on 3.0 or so. This means to be conservative, you have to play on about a 100-120 mile worst case range, not 170-mile best case range. And we don't even know if the CB actually has 3.9. Most bikes fall a little short of their advertised capacity.

For 90% of the country, the small gas tank of the CB will be just a minor inconvenience, but in the far W it will be something you'll constantly have to be planning around if you explore off the interstates. I think most will want to carry some extra fuel bottles.

- Mark
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:42 AM   #1123
DesmoTull
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Mark, Sounds like you'd be happier with another bike.
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:56 AM   #1124
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I think bike manufacturers these days are afraid to produce a bike that is too heavy.
That may explain why the cb1100 has such a small tank. Might also explain why it has a 4-into-1 exhaust instead of the 4-into-4 exhaust system.

I currently ride a zr-7s (air-cooled, inline 4, 750cc, produced in the US 1999-2003) which is a bike with a 6-gallon tank and also comes with a centerstand. The bike was generally lambasted in the motorcycle press ...a lot of poor power to weight ratio comparisons with the sv-650. I personally love the bike. It has great range, is fantastic on the highways (it weighs 525 pounds, btw). Kawasaki no longer produces a bike with a centerstand and definitely nothing with a 6-gallon tank in the sub-1000 cc class.
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Old 02-01-2013, 11:29 AM   #1125
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It's an old-school bike, maybe they are all faxing each other?

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