ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Road warriors
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-23-2013, 07:15 PM   #16
JerryH OP
Vintage Rider
 
JerryH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Chandler, AZ
Oddometer: 4,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRocket View Post
Stick to what you know best; Vulcans
I really don't understand your aversion to the Vulcan 750. I have owned 2 of them, both bought brand new. A '93, which was sold with over 80,000 trouble free miles on it, and still ran like new, and my current '02, with 77,000 miles on it, only problem was the automatic cam chain tensioners, which I replaced with manual tensioners at about 20,000 miles. Otherwise it has also been trouble free, ant it also still runs like new. I would not hesitate to ride it coast to coast right now. The 750, unlike all other Vulcans (other than the parallel twin 500) is NOT a Japanese Harley clone. It has a super high tech engine which has way more in common with a sport bike engine than a cruiser. It has plenty of power to take you anywhere you want to go, at any speed. It handles better than 99% of cruisers, and has comfort rivaling the Goldwing. It will run a 12 second 1/4 mile. I have put 160,000 miles on these 2 bikes, more than any other model, and there are a lot of good reasons for that. It was made completely unchanged except for paint from '85 through '06. If they still made it, I would buy another without even considering anything else.

As for Motus, they have been very secretive about everything. While I agree the Hanlons did everything wrong with E-H, they did it all out in the open. They built a factory (albeit with taxpayers money) and conducted factory tours before production even began. They kept the magazines informed about all the details, including all the mechanical aspects of the bike and engine. They actually gave out more information than most people wanted. And while the E-H price was high, it was way less than the Motus, and had it succeeded, it would have had a much better chance in the market. The motorcycle market is mostly made up of cruisers and crotch rockets.

As someone else asked, where is all the information about the Motus? They are not trying to keep it a secret, but yet they are releasing almost no information on it. They have not explained WHY they missed their deadline for releasing the bike for sale. And of all things, they are talking about selling just the engines, BEFORE they have even released the bike for sale. That is completely unprecedented. Even Harley never sold just engines until they realized the profit to be made by selling genuine Harley engines to custom bike builders, who would otherwise use an EVO clone. But so much was known about the Harley engine, and so many custom frames were available that it fit in, that it made sense. Who woulf buy a Motus engine? What would they use it for? It's specs are for the most part unknown. Nothing is available to put it in. Something just doesn't sound right about this whole thing,
__________________
2002 Vulcan 750 (being repaired, engine has to come out) 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
2012 Zuma 125, 1980 Puch moped
JerryH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 01:41 PM   #17
mrbreeze
Beastly Adventurer
 
mrbreeze's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: God's Country
Oddometer: 7,624
not tom hi jack your thread, but your comments about the Virago are spot on! What a sweet bike! I bought a 750 for my wife, but I think I rode it more than she did. It was comfortable and it handled great. When Yamaha replaced the Viragos with the V-Stars I thought they were crazy - and I still do.

And your 77,000 mile Vulcan is gorgeous! That doesn't look like the stock seat though - is there a story there?
__________________
2013 Suzuki DL650 Adventure

Travels with Maw Maw
mrbreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 09:00 PM   #18
JerryH OP
Vintage Rider
 
JerryH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Chandler, AZ
Oddometer: 4,386
There is indeed a story with this bike, but it's not the seat, it is stock. There are about 20 or so minor modifications to it. It was a CA model, and I removed ALL the emissions crap, the EVAP system, and the air injection system, and there was enough junk there to fill a 5 gallon bucket

But the big story is the brakes. The Vulcan 750 came with dual front discs. Notice mine only has one. The one thing I did not like about the Vulcan was the front brake. It was either on or off. Modulating it was very difficult, and required some thought, not good in a sticky situation. I put 80,000 miles on my '93 like that, and did quite a few unintentional stoppies. I finally got fed up with it on the '02, and decided to do something about it. I noticed that a lot of larger heavier bikes only had one front disc. I had owned a couple of them, and they stopped just fine. So, I removed the right front caliper, and ran a single line to the left one. I then took it out to a safe place and did a lot of testing. I started out slow, and it felt fine. More like what a brake should feel like. Since I had an empty road all to myself, I took it up to high speed, and practiced holding the front brake on the verge of lockup several times, a couple of times from an indicated 100 mph. It worked fine. I considered fade after repeated use, so I tested it over and over again. No fade, no degradation in performance, and stop distances were actually under what the manual stated.

So now that I knew it was safe, I started riding it in normal traffic like that, and it performed beautifully. Much better than before. I was still concerned that the rotor would overheat and warp, but it never did. I figured both the rotor and pads would have a much shorter life, but the pads lasted as long as usual (EBC ORGANIC pads). I rode the bike in the mountains with no problems. I could easily lock the front wheel at will, WITHOUT a death grip. But the real proof of this mod is the fact that I did it with under 20,000 miles on the bike. That's about 60,000 miles of riding with one front brake, and not a single problem. I consider it to be much safer than it was. And after 60,000 miles, the rotor still looks like new. It shows a tiny amount of wear when checked with a micrometer, but it is negligible. I can see the rotor will likely outlast the bike. But since the right and left rotors are exactly the same, I still have a spare.

So not only did this mod make the front brake work a lot better, it also save a bunch of unsprung weight in the front end. That rotor and caliper are heavy. Most riders complain that their bikes don't have enough brakes. The ONLY bike I can say that about was a '66 Triumph Bonneville. For some reason, Kawasaki put to much brakes on the front of the Vulcan 750. Maybe it was because back in '85 when the bike first came out, it was the complete opposite of today. Manufacturers were loading bikes down with as much as they could get on them. Features were where it was at back then, the more the better. And the Vulcan 750, all the way through 2006, was an '85 model. No mechanical changes were made during the entire production run. None were needed.


The Vulcan 750 is not your normal v-twin cruiser. Look at the engine. Obviously liquid cooled, and no fins to make it look like a Harley. It looks very much like an automotive V8 from the end. It is liquid cooled, has dual carbs, four overhead cams, eight valves, four cam chains, four spark plugs, fairly high compression, and a 10,000 rpm redline. It has shaft drive, tubeless tires,and a centerstand. It has a tach, fuel gauge, temp gauge, and even a gadget that will switch the headlight over to the other filament if one burns out. It is a 55 degree single crankpin design with a gear driven counterbalancer. It has a nice low speed rumble, and is dead smooth at highway speeds. It will easily cruise at 80 mph all day with plenty in reserve. It handles well and is extremely comfortable. I just cannot find anything not to like, other than the front brakes, which I fixed. Don't confuse the 750 with the 800 and 900, which ARE typical Japanese Harley copies.
__________________
2002 Vulcan 750 (being repaired, engine has to come out) 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
2012 Zuma 125, 1980 Puch moped
JerryH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 07:36 AM   #19
mrbreeze
Beastly Adventurer
 
mrbreeze's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: God's Country
Oddometer: 7,624
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
The Vulcan 750 is not your normal v-twin cruiser. Look at the engine. Obviously liquid cooled, and no fins to make it look like a Harley. It looks very much like an automotive V8 from the end. It is liquid cooled, has dual carbs, four overhead cams, eight valves, four cam chains, four spark plugs, fairly high compression, and a 10,000 rpm redline. It has shaft drive, tubeless tires,and a centerstand. It has a tach, fuel gauge, temp gauge, and even a gadget that will switch the headlight over to the other filament if one burns out. It is a 55 degree single crankpin design with a gear driven counterbalancer. It has a nice low speed rumble, and is dead smooth at highway speeds. It will easily cruise at 80 mph all day with plenty in reserve. It handles well and is extremely comfortable. I just cannot find anything not to like, other than the front brakes, which I fixed. Don't confuse the 750 with the 800 and 900, which ARE typical Japanese Harley copies.

I can't buy another bike right now, but lately I have been wishing I could pick up an older bike and take it on an extended cross country road trip. Something reliable enough to get me there and back, and yet old enough to make it an adventure. There is a VN700 on CL here (Nashville) that the guy is asking $1000 for! I wish I could jump on that. It would make a good second to my Nomad, and it would be a good commuter. One of the things I like about these bikes is just what you said above - not a HD clone, but a modern cruiser. And not just 8 valves, but those valves have hydraulic adjustment! I could see me touring on one of these, with a w/s, throttle lock, driver's backrest, and soft luggage.
__________________
2013 Suzuki DL650 Adventure

Travels with Maw Maw
mrbreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 04:18 PM   #20
Eye of the Tiger
Adventurer
 
Eye of the Tiger's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: South Carolina
Oddometer: 68
This thread makes me want a Vulcan 750, but I would have to do away with the forward controls, stepped seat, and high handlebars. I'm thinking cafe racer style.
__________________
2008 H-D XL1200N
Eye of the Tiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2013, 04:57 PM   #21
David13
Studly Adventurer
 
David13's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Los Angeles area (SoBay)
Oddometer: 596
I had one. It was ok. I think I had it two years, but only put about 10k on it. Basically I had no problems.
If I remember correctly, the seat was a wide plush cruiser style seat and was very comfortable.
dc
David13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 01:14 AM   #22
JerryH OP
Vintage Rider
 
JerryH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Chandler, AZ
Oddometer: 4,386
Out of 46 bikes I have owned, and several more I have ridden, the Vulcan 750 comes in a close second to the 1500 Goldwing comfortwise. The reason for it's amazing comfort, especially for a 750, is mostly due to it's ergonomics. The seat/bar/peg relationship is perfect. The stock seat is also extremely comfortable. If you install a riders backrest, or strap a sleeping bag to the passenger part of the seat to lean back against, it is like riding an easy chair down the road. It is a completely natural sitting position, much like sitting in a luxury car (or a recumbent bicycle) with your feet out in front of you, leaning slightly rearward with good back support, a wide seat that is not to hard and not too soft, and bars at the perfect height and perfect pullback, so you don't have to lean forward to reach them. Your arms are completely relaxed, with a bend in your elbow. It is nearly an effortless ride, with no pressure points anywhere.

There is a reason why Kawasaki sold the Vulcan 750 for 23 straight years completely unchanged except for paint. As someone who has put 160,000 miles on them, I know what it is. Many others also know. Other than possibly the Virago, there is simply no other 750 size bike that is this comfortable. The Vulcan has the advantage of a lot more power than the Virago, and hydraulic valves, but the Virago has plenty of power for touring, the simplicity of air cooling, and easy to adjust valves. You really can't go wrong with either one. Sadly, neither one is made anymore. Just like the 1500 Goldwing, they were replaced with something less comfortable.
__________________
2002 Vulcan 750 (being repaired, engine has to come out) 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
2012 Zuma 125, 1980 Puch moped
JerryH is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014