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Old 02-04-2013, 12:39 PM   #1171
dirtdreamer50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregster View Post
People love to bash Honda for making such bland bikes, for making bikes with no soul, for not keeping up with the times, for continuing to put out bikes that are way past what most would think of as a sensible product life, and so on. Funny how many hits, comments, and enthusiasm there is for a bike that should epitomize Honda's booring reputation.
Granted that may be the case for some of their products, but not so for the first CB750's. It was the most exciting thing to happen to motorcycling in years. A light weight, smooth running, sand cast IL4, with a disc brake, exceptional HP for the day, and comfortable seating for two... A move that changed the direction for motorcycles from singles and twins to what we now know as supersoprts bikes, excepting Ducati, of course.

Those of us that were riders when it was introduced went through a wonderful period of motorcycle innovations and industry excitement. A time now gone, that may never be seen again. tomp dd50
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Old 02-04-2013, 12:55 PM   #1172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtdreamer50 View Post
Granted that may be the case for some of their products, but not so for the first CB750's. It was the most exciting thing to happen to motorcycling in years. A light weight, smooth running, sand cast IL4, with a disc brake, exceptional HP for the day, and comfortable seating for two... A move that changed the direction for motorcycles from singles and twins to what we now know as supersoprts bikes, excepting Ducati, of course.

Those of us that were riders when it was introduced went through a wonderful period of motorcycle innovations and industry excitement. A time now gone, that may never be seen again. tomp dd50
All true,and mostly the Honda was reliable!!!!!
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:32 PM   #1173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtdreamer50 View Post
Granted that may be the case for some of their products, but not so for the first CB750's. It was the most exciting thing to happen to motorcycling in years. A light weight, smooth running, sand cast IL4, with a disc brake, exceptional HP for the day, and comfortable seating for two... A move that changed the direction for motorcycles from singles and twins to what we now know as supersoprts bikes, excepting Ducati, of course.

Those of us that were riders when it was introduced went through a wonderful period of motorcycle innovations and industry excitement. A time now gone, that may never be seen again. tomp dd50
late 60s 70 s early 80 s were a wonderful time to be a motorcyclist
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Old 02-04-2013, 06:42 PM   #1174
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Originally Posted by The other Ferret View Post
late 60s 70 s early 80 s were a wonderful time to be a motorcyclist
as were the 90's for their technological advancement, the 00's for proliferation of true superbikes & "racebikes with lights" (although that era also gets gigged for the whole chopper / reality show soap opera). The teens are shaping up well too, with the European brands taking the technological lead from the Japanese. Who knew that BMW, once known for doddering bikes with, ahem, design "quirks", would now have some kick ass superbikes and sport tourers, and Honda, born of necessity and proven through racing, with their screaming sixes and V4's are now more content to make entry level bikes and flashbacks to their past.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:32 PM   #1175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The other Ferret View Post
late 60s 70 s early 80 s were a wonderful time to be a motorcyclist
Quote:
Originally Posted by xrcris View Post
as were the 90's for their technological advancement, the 00's for proliferation of true superbikes & "racebikes with lights" (although that era also gets gigged for the whole chopper / reality show soap opera). The teens are shaping up well too, with the European brands taking the technological lead from the Japanese. Who knew that BMW, once known for doddering bikes with, ahem, design "quirks", would now have some kick ass superbikes and sport tourers, and Honda, born of necessity and proven through racing, with their screaming sixes and V4's are now more content to make entry level bikes and flashbacks to their past.
I think that the 60's thru 80's was a time that motorcycling itself changed greatly - sure, now "you meet the nicest people" and it opened to a wider participation. The CB750 was big news and a giant-sized bike then, people wondered why anyone needed a bike that large with so many cylinders - now, riding my friends '75, it seems so small (and light, and nimble (and neat)). I think it was 1972 when the term "Superbike" came into being. I've got that copy of "Cycle" magazine somewhere with the giant Superbike comparison test: the "old guard" Sportster, Norton Commando, CB and the new Kawasaki H2 and Z1, Ducati 750 (and some others I can't recall offhand). It was rapid evolution from unreliable, greasy mastodons and tiny tiddlers of the 50's and early sixties to 11 second quarter mile, 150 mph top end bikes you could ride across the country without worry at a price a lot of people with ordinary incomes could afford.

I remember another article, in "Motorcyclist", on the 20th anniversary of the Kawasaki Z1, where they compared the original bike to the then-current ZX-10. The impression that they gave was "see how far we've come - what awful limitations the rider of the Z1 had". Sounded like bullshit then, and even more so now. Those "vintage" bikes are capable of everything anyone asks from them on the street (even when nobody is looking). The latest evolution adds little capability for the street rider - to the racer, sure, but how many race, really? Or the proliferation of useless electronics like keyless ignitions, that most buyers would probably prefer to avoid.

I think that's why the CB1100 is so interesting to so many. Yes, nostalgia has a bad connotation about seeing the past through rose colored glasses, that things were better then than now. But Honda seems to have cleverly distilled the look and capabilities of the "good old days" better than the others who've tried before (Kawasaki did a terrific job with the W650 and Drifters, but they represent smaller niches, and compromised capability). The CB1100 reaches a larger, more receptive audience. Sure, we can pick nits about colors and how big the gas tank is, but for fans of the UJM, past and present, this bike is on the money. I hope to see lots of them out on the road!

So endeth the sermon...
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:26 PM   #1176
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I've never bought a new bike before, and my 1988 Hawk GT is the newest bike I've ever owned. Do any of you know if you can still buy a factory service manual from Honda for the bikes they are producing these days?
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:48 PM   #1177
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Originally Posted by HapHazard View Post
I think it was 1972 when the term "Superbike" came into being. I've got that copy of "Cycle" magazine somewhere with the giant Superbike comparison test: the "old guard" Sportster, Norton Commando, CB and the new Kawasaki H2 and Z1, Ducati 750 (and some others I can't recall offhand).
Since we're talking whimsical trips down nostalgia lane...

http://www.kawtriple.com/mraxl/artic...uperbikes1.htm

- Mark
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Old 02-05-2013, 04:39 AM   #1178
siyeh
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my dealer called me yesterday

he's got four CB1100's ordered

Honda said he might only get one

and it's mine.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:31 AM   #1179
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Originally Posted by HapHazard View Post
I remember another article, in "Motorcyclist", on the 20th anniversary of the Kawasaki Z1, where they compared the original bike to the then-current ZX-10. The impression that they gave was "see how far we've come - what awful limitations the rider of the Z1 had". Sounded like bullshit then, and even more so now. Those "vintage" bikes are capable of everything anyone asks from them on the street (even when nobody is looking). The latest evolution adds little capability for the street rider - to the racer, sure, but how many race, really? Or the proliferation of useless electronics like keyless ignitions, that most buyers would probably prefer to avoid.
Hold on, Padre. That's a little too dismissive...

The New Bikes are really light years ahead of whatever was offered in the early 70's. Yes, the performance numbers were impressive back then (in a straight line, in particular) but today's bikes are quicker, brake better, handle better, far more reliable, safer, etc.

I have one vintage automobile, a 1958 Plymouth Fury 2Dr HT (a real one, not a clone) and when I hear someone say "they don't make 'em like they used to!" I say to myself "Thank God."
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:46 AM   #1180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The other Ferret View Post
late 60s 70 s early 80 s were a wonderful time to be a motorcyclist
Yes they were. I'm glad I was here to live it.

Everyone has an opinion of what they consider a good looking motorcycle but to me most of the new sportier bikes look like technical origami experiments with wheels.
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Old 02-05-2013, 06:18 AM   #1181
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Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
Yes they were. I'm glad I was here to live it.

Everyone has an opinion of what they consider a good looking motorcycle but to me most of the new sportier bikes look like technical origami experiments with wheels.
To me most modern sport bikes and "adventure" bikes look like something from a Japanese Manga comic. Too many angles and useless pieces of plastic that seem to serve no purpose, too much "make it intentionally ugly and call it 'art'" styling (coughBMWcough.) And fully-faired sportbikes are efficient and fast, but I swear to God, I can't tell them apart. DItto for the wannabe chopper "cruisers" with their Harley clone styles.

I started riding in 82 and I remember what an exciting time that was. I devoured every motorcycle magazine I could get my hands on. I remember the hits and the misses (anybody else remember the Yamaha Vision? A water cooled 550cc V-twin that the magazines raved about - and that buyers absolutely ignored.) The turbo bikes (Honda CX650, Yamaha Seca and the Kawasaki GPz 750), the FJRs and even the UJM cruiser bikes.

In a lot of ways, I think motorcycling reached a zenith then, and after that, motorcycling split into multiple directions. Up through the early 80s the Japanese companies would make one basic platform and then multiple variations of that for cruising, touring, racing, etc. But once we hit about 1986 or so, cruisers went one way, sport bikes went another, and touring bikes yet another.

It's disappointing to me that in 1982 I could choose from a bunch of bikes that all featured shaft drive, full instrumentation (including, in some cases, a gear indicator), cast wheels, triple disc brakes, and a factory center stand. I'm not sure there's ONE bike you can buy today that has all those features (the lack of a factory center stand on chain-driven bikes is particularly galling to me.)

Funny that the 1982 Spectre I bought for $800 in 2007 had cast wheels, triple discs, a fuel gauge (albeit a useless one), a tach, a factory tool kit, a center stand and a seat that hinged on the side and opened easily with the ignition key. OTOH, the Triumph Scrambler I bought in 2009 had none of that, and the Center stand was a $200 aftermarket piece that I had to install myself.

It's not so much that Triumph (and others) couldn't have made their newer bikes as feature-laden as the old ones, it's just that they thought "hey, why should we?"

I guess the reason the Japanese big 4 loaded their bikes with features in the early 80's was that there was a fierce competition going on, so each company brought their full efforts to bear. Once motorcycling split into specific niches, the competition wasn't so harsh. At least that's one thought.

About the only real "innovation" I've seen in recent years is EFI, and IMO that's a mixed blessing. Yes, it keeps you from having to clean or adjust carbs, but it also requires a fuel pump, a pressurized fuel system, a low-fuel warning light instead of the simpler petcock, and of course the computer.
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:12 AM   #1182
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Originally Posted by ZappBranigan View Post
About the only real "innovation" I've seen in recent years is EFI, and IMO that's a mixed blessing. Yes, it keeps you from having to clean or adjust carbs, but it also requires a fuel pump, a pressurized fuel system, a low-fuel warning light instead of the simpler petcock, and of course the computer.
Ooooh, hold up a sec. ABS Brakes are certainly worthy of inclusion. When I get the cb1100 it will have ABS.
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:15 AM   #1183
M3-SRT8
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Since we're talking whimsical trips down nostalgia lane...

http://www.kawtriple.com/mraxl/artic...uperbikes1.htm

- Mark
Thank You, Mark, for that link. Now I remember why my older brother bought that '74 Kawasaki Mk IV 750 Triple.
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:52 AM   #1184
RedRocket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZappBranigan View Post
To me most modern sport bikes and "adventure" bikes look like something from a Japanese Manga comic. Too many angles and useless pieces of plastic that seem to serve no purpose, too much "make it intentionally ugly and call it 'art'" styling (coughBMWcough.) And fully-faired sportbikes are efficient and fast, but I swear to God, I can't tell them apart. DItto for the wannabe chopper "cruisers" with their Harley clone styles.

I started riding in 82 and I remember what an exciting time that was. I devoured every motorcycle magazine I could get my hands on. I remember the hits and the misses (anybody else remember the Yamaha Vision? A water cooled 550cc V-twin that the magazines raved about - and that buyers absolutely ignored.) The turbo bikes (Honda CX650, Yamaha Seca and the Kawasaki GPz 750), the FJRs and even the UJM cruiser bikes.

In a lot of ways, I think motorcycling reached a zenith then, and after that, motorcycling split into multiple directions. Up through the early 80s the Japanese companies would make one basic platform and then multiple variations of that for cruising, touring, racing, etc. But once we hit about 1986 or so, cruisers went one way, sport bikes went another, and touring bikes yet another.

It's disappointing to me that in 1982 I could choose from a bunch of bikes that all featured shaft drive, full instrumentation (including, in some cases, a gear indicator), cast wheels, triple disc brakes, and a factory center stand. I'm not sure there's ONE bike you can buy today that has all those features (the lack of a factory center stand on chain-driven bikes is particularly galling to me.)

Funny that the 1982 Spectre I bought for $800 in 2007 had cast wheels, triple discs, a fuel gauge (albeit a useless one), a tach, a factory tool kit, a center stand and a seat that hinged on the side and opened easily with the ignition key. OTOH, the Triumph Scrambler I bought in 2009 had none of that, and the Center stand was a $200 aftermarket piece that I had to install myself.

It's not so much that Triumph (and others) couldn't have made their newer bikes as feature-laden as the old ones, it's just that they thought "hey, why should we?"

I guess the reason the Japanese big 4 loaded their bikes with features in the early 80's was that there was a fierce competition going on, so each company brought their full efforts to bear. Once motorcycling split into specific niches, the competition wasn't so harsh. At least that's one thought.

About the only real "innovation" I've seen in recent years is EFI, and IMO that's a mixed blessing. Yes, it keeps you from having to clean or adjust carbs, but it also requires a fuel pump, a pressurized fuel system, a low-fuel warning light instead of the simpler petcock, and of course the computer.


Too bad isn't it. I really miss the self canceling turn signals.
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Old 02-05-2013, 08:25 AM   #1185
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Since we're talking whimsical trips down nostalgia lane...

http://www.kawtriple.com/mraxl/artic...uperbikes1.htm

- Mark
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