ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-04-2013, 06:51 AM   #1
Krazyjohnny OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: McKinney, TX
Oddometer: 437
Super Hero Proving Grounds as a Business?

Man!,

I am beginning to really hate working for someone else. That being said, myself and another inmate have been thinking about doing a business venture together. Basically we will be available to install the aftermarket goodies many folks want to add to their bikes, but do not have the time to do nor the tools. We may even do the basic oil change stuff as well.

We are in the North Dallas area and wonder how it will work out. Thinking we will start off doing this part time and see where it goes.
__________________
President and Founder of
Superhero Proving Grounds
"Where dreams are made and egos are checked"
08' 530 EXCR, 09' Yamaha FZ-6 and dreaming of a new bike
Krazyjohnny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 07:34 AM   #2
TheOtherBart
Beastly Adventurer
 
TheOtherBart's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DeKalb County, Illinois
Oddometer: 1,822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazyjohnny View Post
Man!,

I am beginning to really hate working for someone else. That being said, myself and another inmate have been thinking about doing a business venture together. Basically we will be available to install the aftermarket goodies many folks want to add to their bikes, but do not have the time to do nor the tools. We may even do the basic oil change stuff as well.

We are in the North Dallas area and wonder how it will work out. Thinking we will start off doing this part time and see where it goes.
There are a zillion and one things you have to think about here to even have the foggiest notion whether or not it will work out. What kind of demand do you think there is for that kind of service, or how much can you drum up? How much are people willing to pay for those services? And not "I've talked to a lot of people and they say they'd pay $XXX", because what people say and how people behave when it comes time to actually spend the money are drastically different.

What are your costs? Do you already have all of the tools and other facilities you need? Considering the costs, how much revenue would you need to generate in order to make it worth your while? Or to make it support two people (with families?). Are you required to be licensed in your jurisdiction? What about zoning? I'd be up a creek if I started charging for oil changes out of my garage, the town powers that be would not be pleased. Liability insurance? If you install an accessory and 50 miles later a rider bins it, are you protected?

That's not even scratching the surface. If this is seriously something you want to do instead of working for someone else then you need to get down to business with some serious research and planning.
TheOtherBart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 07:41 AM   #3
sailah
Lampin' it
 
sailah's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: Turning expensive metal into scrap
Oddometer: 5,391
I'm sure you can find people that want that. Personally that's my favorite part

Check into insurance if you are doing this seriously what happens if something falls off and the guy wrecks?
__________________
We're not out here to rough it. We're here to smooth it . Things are rough enough in town.

Nessmuk
sailah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 08:04 AM   #4
Krazyjohnny OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: McKinney, TX
Oddometer: 437
Very familiar with the insurance stuff. Have been doing work for many insurance companies for many years in the The oil change stuff requires some added costs for oil disposal and then licensing as the right size generator of waste oil. That alone makes it prohibitive. Most folks in our area do not really use their farkles for the hardcore nature they are designed. They like the "look" more than anything. There are folks in our area that own bikes and do not have a wrench in their garage. Yes it is true. That is the market we are going to target very gently I might add.

I have done this sort of thing back 10 or more years ago. It was different in that I was fabricating custom roof racks for safari and guide vehicles. I catered to a very select client group which was pretty lucrative due to the simple fact that what I was providing filled a gap that was not provided here stateside.
__________________
President and Founder of
Superhero Proving Grounds
"Where dreams are made and egos are checked"
08' 530 EXCR, 09' Yamaha FZ-6 and dreaming of a new bike
Krazyjohnny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 05:23 AM   #5
cat
Beastly Adventurer
 
cat's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Durban, South Africa.
Oddometer: 1,323
Why is your name Krazy Johnny?

__________________

cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 06:41 AM   #6
xcflyn
Beastly Adventurer
 
xcflyn's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 1,130
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat View Post
Why is your name Krazy Johnny?



But on a serious note. I think you need to do more then the add on stuff to pull it off: I think service work is needed too.
I am in a small mountain town so to speak, and there is a guy here who is swamped all summer with work, then heads south a screws off all winter, who would think he could make it ? Then again I see every brand of bike in and out of his shop, he is reasonable in price, and top of the list - he knows his business ! This guy will add a mirror to a bike for one guy and rip apart the lower end of a harley for another. I have seen a KTM 990, gas gas, 72 shovel, and a wing all in his shop at one time. Clearly the Harley was getting a rebuild while the others were just getting a service done - thats was a joke.
But as mentioned , you need to look at the whole picture and have a real business plan. Do it on a whim and thats what you have, make a plan and stick to it. Enough passion for it and it will happen. Personally I would not partner with anyone in a business unless they were a silent parter. Families get broken up over business ventures, friendships can dissolve, and spouses find new spouses when you are working 80 hours a week (dont ask how I know that last one). Good luck !
xcflyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 10:52 AM   #7
Off Road Ryder
Beastly Adventurer
 
Off Road Ryder's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Kent Wa
Oddometer: 2,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by xcflyn View Post



But as mentioned , you need to look at the whole picture and have a real business plan. Do it on a whim and thats what you have, make a plan and stick to it. Enough passion for it and it will happen. Personally I would not partner with anyone in a business unless they were a silent parter. Families get broken up over business ventures, friendships can dissolve, and spouses find new spouses when you are working 80 hours a week (dont ask how I know that last one). Good luck !
Very good advise here, Every venture I have had with a partner has eventually gone sour, remember you are marrying that person.
One thing is for sure, business is not easy and sometimes turning your hobby into a business, ruins that hobby for you, That has not happened to myself, but its came close a few times, like not being able to race 24hr events due to needing to be available for customers is a real bummer, but it goes with the territory.
The powersports industry in general is a rough spot to play in right now, I have been talking about opening up a Motorcycle boutique for years, perhaps the climate will change in the near future to the point where I feel thats the time has come.
Whatever you decide I wish you good luck.
__________________
When Quality matters,Its all about choices.
Cyclops Performance LED Vendors thread
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=839163
www.cyclopsadventuresports.com
1-800-624-0278
Off Road Ryder is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 12:04 PM   #8
billc281261
n00b
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Oddometer: 1
I must say that working with a friend is not ideal, it has not worked for me in the past. Turning a hobby into a business is a hard transition, I was a motorcycle courier for two years back in London, riding in all weathers and very long hours, I came so close to selling all my bikes and never riding again.
Think long and hard about the future but if you decide to go for it, Good Luck!!
billc281261 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 12:12 PM   #9
Wlfman
Beastly Adventurer
 
Wlfman's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: TN/AL
Oddometer: 1,288
Better get some DAMN GOOD Liability insurance and make sure you get your business set up as a LLC.
__________________
I ride not to add days to my life, but to add life to my days.

Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the people who are doing it."
"Now and then it's good to pause in our pursuit of happiness and JUST BE HAPPY."
Wlfman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 01:15 PM   #10
Transalp Jas
Studly Adventurer
 
Transalp Jas's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Corner Brook,NL
Oddometer: 806
I'm not sure I'd want to modify other people's bikes. Opening an independent service shop I could see- Fluid changes, tires, maybe replacement of stock parts like bearings and brakes. Modifying or installing aftermarket parts carries a load of possible problems with it. There are all kinds of aftermarket parts, and a lot of them are not street-legal. What happens if you damage the electrical system of a brand new GS while installing some cheap aftermarket hand warmers? What happens if you install some new luggage on a motorcycle, and the owner goes down after 50 miles, totals his bike, and tells his insurance company that your "improperly installed" aftermarket luggage threw off the balance of his bike, causing him to "lay 'er down?"

I am BY NO MEANS trying to discourage you from following your dreams! Just make sure you're ready, and that you consider the potential pitfalls as well as the potential success.
__________________
Chuck Norris can blow bubbles with beef jerky.

Chuck Norrris has never gotten a Jeopardy question wrong. Jesus has missed two.
Transalp Jas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 07:30 AM   #11
Krazyjohnny OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: McKinney, TX
Oddometer: 437
All very good points to consider. And I will take them all into consideration.

As for the name.....

Back a few years ago, I was really into the mountain biking thing. I never got into the racing scene because it just was not my thing. Me and a few guys always rode together and rode to the point of failure alot of times and then keep going. I got my "Krazyjohnny" moniker due to the fact that they would have me plan trips and more often than not what I deemed as pretty novice stuff was not to some of the others that wanted to tag along.

So there ya have it. Not much has changed.
__________________
President and Founder of
Superhero Proving Grounds
"Where dreams are made and egos are checked"
08' 530 EXCR, 09' Yamaha FZ-6 and dreaming of a new bike
Krazyjohnny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 08:21 AM   #12
bomber60015
Anatomically Correct
 
bomber60015's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Chicago-ish
Oddometer: 8,829
Krazy --
For a while, I did maintenance and simple mods out of my garage -- like with most new, small businesses, most of my early customers were acquaintances (my friends didn't need my services, being of a similar mindset).

Overall, it was a highly enjoyable experience, but there were a few customers that had very mercenary attitudes . . . "You changed the oil on my bike a month ago, and now the clutch cable is broken -- come pick up my bike or I'll make a report to the BBB." Often, our "friendship" was used as a crowbar in an attempt to get what they thought of as preferential treatment, and what I thought of as, well, unreasonable requests.

So long as there are those whose primary mission in life is ending every day feeling like they got over on SOMEone, these folks will be at your shop in some percentage . . . .

Like others, I wish you luck -- just be prepared to spend more time than you might expect in setting, and enforcing, expectations . . . . .
__________________
"Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders, cherish the natural resources, cherish the history and romance as a sacred heritage, for your children and your children's children. Do not let selfish men or greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches or its romance. T.R.
bomber60015 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014