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Old 02-06-2013, 05:18 AM   #166
K88
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Reading the posts here, you realise that beauty, form and function are in the eye of the beholder. For every person who hates a particular bike, there is another who loves it.
That said, the worst bike I ever owned was a KTM495XC, followed closely by a KTMGS250LC, both of which I owned in the 1980s. They were great bikes, but not great bikes for me ... I just couldn't get used to them, never felt comfortable or confident on them, didn't like the power, the geometry. But beautiful to look at!
This should be a "Worst bike for me" thread.
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:46 AM   #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockmuncher View Post
I had a 1980 HD FLT. Worst bike ever. Bought it with 5000 miles on it {should have been a sign} and blew a head gasket right away. When it was running, which wasn't often, the best you could do was 80 mph. When you went around a corner, it had so much flex that it felt like you were riding a sideways spring. It had an enclosed oil bath final chain drive that was a cluster fuck to do anything with. When I bought it, I was a die hard Harley guy, when I sold it I swore I would never have another. The only way it could have been worse is if.............sorry, I can't imagine how it could have been worse.
I also had a 1980 FLT.

Like you say, not a good bike by today's standards, but I actually really enjoyed it.
Classic example of enjoying something for what it is, rather than wanting it to be something it isn't.
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:49 AM   #168
twinjet
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The worst (or best if you like terror) would be the Kawasaki 750 Triple (two stroke).
People would come back from their first test ride with all the blood drained out of their faces and white knuckles. Some 750s wouldn't even track straight going down the road.
I friend of mine has one leg shorter than the other after crashing while trying to follow a Norton down a canyon road.
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:28 AM   #169
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Late 60s Honda CB450 bought new, Total POS, carbs wouldn't stay balanced, the wiring harness was full of shorts almost immediately and it would death wobble at the slightest provocation.
I parked it before it killed me or left me stranded in a bad place, finally traded it as part payment on a race car, it blew up the bottom end the first time he rode it.
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:09 PM   #170
windburn
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I have only owned Honda's so I can't offer judgment

Last month I saw this Honda 400 automatic is Wabash, Indiana on a shop floor it was for sale for $900



At the Lane Auto Museum in Nashville Tenn. I saw the McClean one wheel motorcycle



The Yikebike is perhaps the strangest modern bike on two wheels


windburn screwed with this post 02-06-2013 at 09:00 PM
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:48 PM   #171
crofrog
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DRZ400.

It's just good enough to keep you spending money on trying to make it better but at the end of the day it's still a turd.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:15 AM   #172
ata
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you´re right

a couple of friends of mine did exactly that
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:57 AM   #173
Rockmuncher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
I also had a 1980 FLT.

Like you say, not a good bike by today's standards, but I actually really enjoyed it.
Classic example of enjoying something for what it is, rather than wanting it to be something it isn't.
I just wanted it to not be a turd. Now let's go have a beer.
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Old 02-07-2013, 11:47 AM   #174
TLR_Mart
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While the TX750 may be regarded as the biggest POS dumped on all motorcycledom, I have nothing but fond memories of it. My dad inherited a '73 TX750 back when I was but a young'un, and rebuilt the motor. I wasn't allowed in the cellar for months cause there were parts strewn all over the floor. But when it was done, it purred like a kitten.

I used to sit behind and enjoy the scenery flashing by, the smells, the purity of the moment. The bike never broke, but required points and stuff from time to time. It ended up sitting in the cellar for about 10yrs until my brother decided to take it out for the summer, then sat again until about 4yrs ago when my parents sold the old house, and the bike.

If it wasn't for Yamaha putting out a gabage pail of a bike, I wouldn't be a rider today. And for that, I thank Yamaha, and the TX750 immensely!
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Old 02-07-2013, 01:51 PM   #175
ChadHahn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RT jim View Post
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Yes, the CB900 Custom. I had one it was pretty nice. Shaft drive, air suspension, dual range transmission. Pretty comfortable to ride all day.

Chad
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:36 PM   #176
GordyOZ
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Obviously you guys were lucky enough to avoid the amazing(ly awful) FT500 Honda and the Suzuki GS250FWS, the first one didn't handle (long thin forks and fully independent variable frame geometry to rival a H2 kwaka) and the second one didn't go (wound up the other side of 10 thou and then you got off and walked next to it), either would have been a good bid for worst bike of the eighties.
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:34 AM   #177
concours
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Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Maybe I'm being British-bike harsh here, but I'd bet the overall reliability of even the ill-fated TX750 was better than the Commandos, especially the later-model 850s.

Also nitpicking, but the TX500 twins really weren't UJM's which are generally defined as Japanese four-cylinder standards, not twins. And while the TX500's did have problems, they weren't fundamentally flawed like the 750 was.

Mid-70's was a rough period for Yamaha streetbikes as it transitioned from two-strokes to four-strokes. They completely missed the trend towards four-cylinders until finally catching the program in the late-70's with the XS-Eleven (which had its share of issues too, mainly chassis).

These sorts of lists have to include the Suzuki Madura:



- Mark
My XS1100 I bought new ran like a scalded cat, I installed a Wiseco 1196cc big bore kit, Yosh cams, I ran it as hard as I could and barely keep my license everytime I rode it, NEVER A WHIMPER. What chassis problems are we talking? Tapered roller bearings at the swing arm and steering neck were very robust. Wheelies all the time!
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:35 AM   #178
concours
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TLR_Mart View Post
While the TX750 may be regarded as the biggest POS dumped on all motorcycledom, I have nothing but fond memories of it. My dad inherited a '73 TX750 back when I was but a young'un, and rebuilt the motor. I wasn't allowed in the cellar for months cause there were parts strewn all over the floor. But when it was done, it purred like a kitten.

I used to sit behind and enjoy the scenery flashing by, the smells, the purity of the moment. The bike never broke, but required points and stuff from time to time. It ended up sitting in the cellar for about 10yrs until my brother decided to take it out for the summer, then sat again until about 4yrs ago when my parents sold the old house, and the bike.

If it wasn't for Yamaha putting out a gabage pail of a bike, I wouldn't be a rider today. And for that, I thank Yamaha, and the TX750 immensely!
The bike went WITH the house sale?
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:52 AM   #179
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concours View Post
My XS1100 I bought new ran like a scalded cat, I installed a Wiseco 1196cc big bore kit, Yosh cams, I ran it as hard as I could and barely keep my license everytime I rode it, NEVER A WHIMPER. What chassis problems are we talking? Tapered roller bearings at the swing arm and steering neck were very robust. Wheelies all the time!
They call old BMW's rubber cows because of the flexing frame. I would call my old XS Eleven a wet noodle. It went good, but turned and stopped for crap.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:25 PM   #180
concours
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They call old BMW's rubber cows because of the flexing frame. I would call my old XS Eleven a wet noodle. It went good, but turned and stopped for crap.
I added a fork brace by Christopher Chassis Products, also had them brace my swing arm, S&W Street Stroker shocks, drilled the rotors (between the punched slots) and even though the rotors were stainless, they stopped pretty good. The OEM Bridgestone Mag Mopus tires were hard plastic, or so it felt. I was never left behind that I remember. We used to carve this to ribbons late fall after the leaf peepers went home... http://www.kancamagushighway.com/
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