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Old 02-03-2013, 07:14 AM   #16
Snarky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Hello Everyone,

Questions:

1. Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?

2. What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?

3. What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?

4. What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?

Again, I would really appreciate your help!

Thank you!
There is a big difference between a Dual Sport and an Adventure bike, this is just my opinion and everyone here will have a different one.

The Dual Sport bike is something that is just powerful enough to drive on the road so you can get to an offroad area and thrash it. Examples are bikes like the XT225/250, WR250, DR-Z400 and many others. Generally speaking, they are not pleasant to ride for long periods of time on the highway at highway speeds. It can be done, and has been, but usually by some folks that are hardcore and borderline insane.

Conversely, Adventure bikes are big beefy, high horsepower monsters that are closer to sport-touring bikes than they are to dual sports. These bikes are at home on the highway, but also have the capability to drive down some rougher roads that you wouldn't take a sport-touring bike with a 17" front wheel down. Examples of these bikes are the BMW GS bikes, the Super Tenere, the Triumph Tiger XC, and more. That said, you can of course thrash these bikes offroad, and many people have done it, but usually again: the hardcore and borderline insane folks.

There are also bikes that are between these two classifications. The KLR is more on the dual-sporty side, the V-strom is more on the Adventure side, but they are pretty middle of the road. Neither one is light weight or particulary powerful, but they are a somewhat balanced approach.

Answer:
1. On road. I spend probably 95% of my time on pavement. When I'm Adventuring it'll be for stretch of about 12 hours in the saddle at a time. The other 5% is shit roads that are technically roads, but you couldn't usually traverse with a normal sports bike.

2. The "feel" of the bike is what led me to buy it, it's an intangible thing created by the sum of it's parts. I would say it's a combination of comfort, displacement, and style.

3. I look for something that gets me excited when I look at it and more excited when I actually ride it.

4. I would say that for any motorcycle the primary feeling is "freedom". Usually there's no cellphone to bother you, you have an almost limitless power to weight ratio when compared to cars, and you can point it in a direction and just go and usually not worry about fuel capacity or cost. It's the feeling of liberation from society: Even in traffic you have the ability to dart about, pass most others easily, and plus you occasionally get the feeling of imminent death.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:33 AM   #17
KG6BWS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarky View Post
There is a big difference between a Dual Sport and an Adventure bike, this is just my opinion and everyone here will have a different one.

The Dual Sport bike is something that is just powerful enough to drive on the road so you can get to an offroad area and thrash it. Examples are bikes like the XT225/250, WR250, DR-Z400 and many others. Generally speaking, they are not pleasant to ride for long periods of time on the highway at highway speeds. It can be done, and has been, but usually by some folks that are hardcore and borderline insane.

Conversely, Adventure bikes are big beefy, high horsepower monsters that are closer to sport-touring bikes than they are to dual sports. These bikes are at home on the highway, but also have the capability to drive down some rougher roads that you wouldn't take a sport-touring bike with a 17" front wheel down. Examples of these bikes are the BMW GS bikes, the Super Tenere, the Triumph Tiger XC, and more. That said, you can of course thrash these bikes offroad, and many people have done it, but usually again: the hardcore and borderline insane folks.

There are also bikes that are between these two classifications. The KLR is more on the dual-sporty side, the V-strom is more on the Adventure side, but they are pretty middle of the road. Neither one is light weight or particulary powerful, but they are a somewhat balanced approach.

Answer:
1. On road. I spend probably 95% of my time on pavement. When I'm Adventuring it'll be for stretch of about 12 hours in the saddle at a time. The other 5% is shit roads that are technically roads, but you couldn't usually traverse with a normal sports bike.

2. The "feel" of the bike is what led me to buy it, it's an intangible thing created by the sum of it's parts. I would say it's a combination of comfort, displacement, and style.

3. I look for something that gets me excited when I look at it and more excited when I actually ride it.

4. I would say that for any motorcycle the primary feeling is "freedom". Usually there's no cellphone to bother you, you have an almost limitless power to weight ratio when compared to cars, and you can point it in a direction and just go and usually not worry about fuel capacity or cost. It's the feeling of liberation from society: Even in traffic you have the ability to dart about, pass most others easily, and plus you occasionally get the feeling of imminent death.
Well said. Its that "alive" feeling that you just cant get in a car.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:40 AM   #18
dillon
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The single biggest thing I look for in my bikes is ease of maintenance, this extends to parts cost in my book. This is followed closely by bike weight. Honestly engine displacement is hardly even on my list of needs, any of the modern 250cc engines will take you down the highway when needed. Other things I think of is crash protection and fuel capacity. It used to annoy me that my KLX only has a 2 gallon tank, but I just carry extra fuel when needed and have come to like the lighter weight and thinner dimensions of a small tanked bike. In your design a set of removable axillary tanks would be brilliant if you decide to spec out a smaller tank. Small fixed tank for hardcore off road, then fit the "drop tanks" for long trips. Anyway As far as my details I have been riding for 4 years, and I do not own a car, so I ride rain sun or snow, and I average about 15K miles a year. I usually ride about 70% on road and 30% off.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:28 AM   #19
Bill 310
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
My name is Jake. To be honest,
Hi Jake, future business lesson one never write or say to a client "to be honest" or any of the variations thereof. Old guys like me just assume that you will then have been or will be lying to us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
I am currently designing a mid to heavy weight Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle (not a mx conversion dual sport, but more like a KTM 690 or BMW G 650GS) for a Project and I would really appreciate it if you could take the time to help me out with a few questions I have!
Sure, first of all make the bike lighter


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.
I am in 57 years old. I have twice finished the Iron Butt Rally and completed 20 IBA Certified rides. I have ridden all over this continent and now have shipped a Europe. I have ridden about 500,000 kms in the last 12 years.

I have taken a lot of riding classes and completed the equivalent of week one of the motor officer's course.

I have over a dozen rides into the arctic.I am a competent but cautious off pavement rider. Off pavement is gravel and dirt roads not single track

Motorcycles Currently owned

2007 KTM 990 ADV (now lives in Europe)
2008 BMW K 1200 GT
2012 Yamaha Super Tenere

Prior MC's

2005 Honda Goldwing GL 1800
2004 BMW K1200LT
2003 BMW 1150 GS Adventure
2001 BMW 1150GS

I used to ride year round but decided I didn't need to ride in shitty weather anymore. I will plate my Tenere next week and all the bikes are off the road by November 30

I do long distance touring and regular around town stuff. We are are riding in Iceland in May and Europe for two weeks in September

I ski (former pro patroller), target shoot,am a hobby photographer, go to art galleries , and walk 3.2 miles every day


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?
On


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?
Ergonomics I am 6'4" tall
ABS brakes
light weight
reliable
price
21" front wheel (KTM only)




Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?
See above

Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?
No phone, living in the moment, experiencing life


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
If you were to design the perfect motorcycle for you what features would it have
It would be set up with the stuff that is proven to work and have some long desired features

Here is my list

HID or LED headlights that actually light up the road

Directional signals that are LED big an visible and built into the MC so that they don't get knocked off and broken. Brake light tht is huge and bright

Already plugs installed for heated gear with heavy gauge wire. triple tree pre threaded for ram mounts

Over capacity alternator

A centre stand that does not need gravity defiance to engage

A decent bash plate and engine guards

footpegs that a size 12 boot will fit on, the same goes for rear brake and shifter levers

a scotts steering stabilizer as standard

21" tubeless front wheel spoked, 18" on rear
switchable abs

a decent horn and mirrors that don't need extension or vibrate all day

one piece seat to make it easier when a custom seat is purchased.
runs on regular gas

MC comes with a decent tool kit that fits everything on bike

two gas tank options 5.5 and 11.3 (drop and swap)

creative rear exhaust to keep bike narrow. perhaps under seat with guard

mc should be able to carry hard bags 100 liters capacity and still be 34" wide or splitting.

100 hp & equivalent torque

basic service that anyone can do. Oil/filter change in less than 10 without having to give bike a colonoscopy

external fuel filter and pump

Air filter that is an easy job

chain drive

simple panel that switches imperial to metric

heated grips real handlever guards

under 450 pounds dry


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Again, I would really appreciate your help!
It would be a nice gesture to share your project and grade on here


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Thank you!
You are welcome
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:41 AM   #20
Pantah
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Hi Jake - I was a college student once, so I'd like to help. My college project was starting and operating a motorcycle shop. While attending San Jose State, I was a part time salesman with Grand Prix Cycles in Santa Clara, and a D36 and CMC motocrosser. My racing ended in a stadium in 1981 when I hurt myself enough for a years worth of rehab. I sold everything off.

At age 50 I bought myself a Ducati, but discovered adventure riding a few years later. My first Adventure bike was a KTM 950A. Just sitting on it in the showroom was like old home week. It was a lot more like my YZ's than any BMW. I bought it on the spot and rode it all over the continent for 7 years. Every trip involved at least some dirt roads or forest roads. These are things I can still do at my age so I needed a bike to help me.

In 2010 I decided to ride the Continental Divide Ride solo. The KTM was too big and heavy for that. I needed a bike I could pick up out of the mud by myself. So I bought a Yamaha WR250R, equipped it and shipped it to Salt Lake to tackle the CDR. It was an awesome 2 weeks of some 2500 miles of dirt, sand and mud. The bike was so good, I sold the KTM and bought a bike similar to my Yamaha in most dimensions except that it had 2.5X the power; a 2012 KTM 690R. I equipped it exactly like the Yamaha. That is; mods to enhance travel, range and comfort.

The KTM 690 is a good product to model from for your project. It weighs about 300 lbs so fairly easy to pick up solo. It has a great motor and a 6 speed gearbox. Plus very sophisticated suspension. However it only has about 170 miles fuel range (I like 220 miles) and the tank is the rear subframe, which limits the bike's versatility.

The Yamaha is a good product to model from too. It has a nice aluminum twin spar chassis combined with a steel rear subframe. That means it is versatile for equipping luggage and hauling stuff. The bike is a little too short with a 56 inch wheelbase and of course the power is not ideal, but enough. It also weighs about 300 lbs. Both are smooth on the highway and excellent plonking along in the rough stuff.

My bikes have to be able to superslab for days on end, yet roll rock gardens and sand washes too. Those elements are a critical part of my trips. In short, my answers to all your questions center on the trips I envision. That is; can I get it done with this or not? In my case, real dirt bikes are out and so are the big heavy multi-cylinder adventure travel bikes.

My Yamaha 50 miles from tar northeast of Lake Powell in Southern Utah:



The KTM here in town and somewhere in Vermont:



Good luck and study hard. It's worth it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Hello Everyone,

My name is Jake. To be honest, I am a college student studying Product Design and a complete beginner to Motorcycles (only rode once on my Uncles KTM 450 MX, but I do ride quads). I am currently designing a mid to heavy weight Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle (not a mx conversion dual sport, but more like a KTM 690 or BMW G 650GS) for a Project and I would really appreciate it if you could take the time to help me out with a few questions I have!

Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.

Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?

What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?

What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?

What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?

Again, I would really appreciate your help!

Thank you!
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Old 02-03-2013, 06:34 PM   #21
hayduke.klr07
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Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.

My name is Chris, I ride a KLR, moderate amounts of experience, daily when in season, I commute and ride two tracks on the weekend and really enjoy week plus touring trips. Oh yea, I am a Pisces.
Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?

i ride both but end up 60% on the asphalt due to commuting.

What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?
reliability, ease of DIY maintenance, style
What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?
Value, sub $10k
What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?
freedom, sense of adventure,
Again, I would really appreciate your help!

Thank you![/QUOTE]

Do a search for "ccm adventure". That moto has me enamored and I really hope it comes to this continent.
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Old 02-16-2013, 11:10 PM   #22
twasp
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research info

Hi Jake. I will try to give you some info. Your request seems to be biased towards what most of us would consider Adventure bikes. BMW and KTM are expensive marks that do not always come equiped with quality equipment. ie. seats, suspension brakes reliability ergonomics to name a few.

I am in my 60s, don't get out to ride too often, used to be at least a low intermediate rider. Now have a DR650 that I have modified extensively to try to achieve these goals. Long range solo dual sport rides, tar 60 to several hundred miles to get to dirt roads, back roads, two track and then normally an even longer ride home on tar to get back to work on time.

These are my goals that I modify to achieve. Comfort, seat, bars, pegs relationship. Handling, If it won't handle on dirt and tar it is worthless. Power, we ride for the thrill of the ride, no power then why are we out there? Range, how much MPG does it get and how much fuel. Three hundred miles, minimum and preferably 500.
Reliabilty, air cooled, carb, easy to work on, wet sump, light enough to handle off road and light enough to pickup by myself . Lights, can you see where you are going above 25 miles per hour. Can you see against the headlights of oncomming traffic? Electrical capacity, can you run extra lights, heated clothing? Do the brakes work ? Will they stop in an emergency? If a car turns left or a deer runs in front of you can you at least scrub enough speed to survive the impact? Suspension, can you ride a hundred mile of washboard roads on it, or some of the California freeways?

Does this bike put you in the flow when you ride it? As one with the bike, riding effortlessly without fear on any road or terrain?


This is what I think they are building today.. ill handling, too tall,top heavy pigs, underpowered, poor quality suspension, set up for ultra light riders, inadequet brakes, with known problems that are not rectified from year to year for years on end. Poseur bikes not meant for anything except graded dirt road or tar. And those are there good points, with seats that would be outlawed for use in prisons. Tom
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Old 02-23-2013, 08:02 AM   #23
markk53
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Originally Posted by Al Goodwin View Post
Just take a Kawasaki KLR650, a pre '08 model...give it 30% more power, better suspension, and shave off 70lbs.....there's your perfect dual-sport bike.

You must mean a KLX650 with a bigger gas tank! They already made the base model without the tank, but KLR riders wouldn't pay for the better suspension, increased performance, and a bit lighter weight. Never have, never will.
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Old 02-23-2013, 09:16 AM   #24
Fishenough
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Laugh

Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.

Hi, and good luck on a successively project! I'm 46 and have been riding since 11 or 12 like most rural Canadian males. Riding style has changes with the years and the plates bolted to my spine, but I will firstly seek dirt roads, even when I own a purely street bike. Where you live and where you plan to ride dictates what bikes you want/need. The last five years I covered 130,000 km plus, but that was with year round riding in SE Asia, now I'm interested in the western chuck of Canada and Alaska. I'd have thought different 10 years ago, but I feel anything bigger than a 650 for riding between Europe to Japan is completely unnecessary, and even worse would take away from your enjoyment. (Yes, yes, anything with a motor and 2 wheels can be riding around the world)

Edit, I recently bought a 2012 DR650.


Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?

The longer, the rougher the road, you just know the destination with be that much sweeter, or breathtaking, or unspoiled.

Aim for off road primarily, paved roads just connect the dots.


What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?

Reliability and track record, available parts and accessories, stock offroad capabilities. I try and leave emotion aside to a degree, this has lead me astray a couple of times - though I still had fab times with those bikes.

50 hp and 150 kg would be all I ever need in a dual sport, for anywhere in the world. Have owned a kitted 500 2 stroke MX bike, and honestly using more than 40-50 hp offroad is best left for playtime, or racing. Long paved stretches, it needs to be smooth BUT I will never be riding over 120 kph, or 75 mph. And unlike 20 years ago, speeding tickets are a big fail to me.

I did far more group riding, than ever before in these last 5 years, and many a time I would comfortably ride 50+ mph on dry, hard packed dirt roads with a 250 motard with street tires, yet the fully loaded big adventure bikes would be slower in all but the long straights. On all but the highways, all surfaces, passing big GS's, and such, was normal and common with 200 to 250 cc low powered bikes. Heck once every month or so, a big dual sport would just about end up in the weeds trying to pace riders on smaller bikes on twisty paved mountain roads. Sadly one 4 month old 1200 did ended up jammed under a guard rail well trying keep pace (the well kitted rider was ok, only bruised).

I don't mean to sound like I'm bashing big dual sports, I drool over them extensively. Read Colebatch's, and others, (AWESOME) ride reports to understand. Emotion and desirability play hugely of course into motorcycle purchases.


What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?

One that best fits the riding I have in mind. I really don't want to compromise and buy something that will be great for one thing and lack in another type of riding that I've enjoyed all my life - this has kept me from considering the big dual sports. But note, if my riding style changes again, a big gravel goldwing would be a treat - this is easy to picture in my mind.

Tend to compare all dual sports to the models that have been successful and are still being sold in a similar model today; look at the XR650L and the DR650, seemingly unchanged since I started riding, yet even the top of the line choices really are so similar with improvements in a handful of areas.

You can modify a lot on a bike, but I'm am really found that I prefer a fuel injected thumper for several reasons.


What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?

To ask this indicates you need to try it yourself!!! SO many others have elaborated wonderfully on this, but for me it's the wonderful feeling of giving a sustained 100% focus that is neither tiresome demanding, that is like reaching and sustaining a state of nirvana effortlessly. Falling asleep with a clear, and content, mind after a full days riding is guaranteed. Traffic sucks that away, hence the desire to get off the beaten track.

Thank you!
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:27 AM   #25
Plaka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Hello Everyone,

My name is Jake. To be honest, I am a college student studying Product Design and a complete beginner to Motorcycles (only rode once on my Uncles KTM 450 MX, but I do ride quads). I am currently designing a mid to heavy weight Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle (not a mx conversion dual sport, but more like a KTM 690 or BMW G 650GS) for a Project and I would really appreciate it if you could take the time to help me out with a few questions I have!

Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.

Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?

What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?

What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?

What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?

Again, I would really appreciate your help!

Thank you!
Your job is styling the motorcycle. You come up with a "look" that will sell the product. This is 85% of your job. The other 15% is communicating the design so you can sell it to management. You can sell the worst idea with good communication. Your rendering skills count far more than your styling skills.

As far as the function of the machine, marketing is going to figure up what will sell and tell you and engineering. They will get a lot wrong. Engineering will try to do it and get more wrong.

Pay attention to that comment about the GS. It's salient. The bike is a comfortable, good handling road bike, dressed up to give a studly adventurer image. Some people do take them off road. But the image is what is selling the thing, along with the road manners. You want a style that totally conveys "studly adventurer" without all the compromises, cost and discomfort of a real studly adventurer bike. look at how real cross county racing bikes look and copy as much as you can. The wanna-bees will eat it up. Don't worry about the function in the least. The schools make a big deal about Ergonomics, function, user interface, blah blah, blah (I'm UC DAAP grad, BS industrial design) but you get hired to do little of that. You're a product stylist.

Ask here what about the look of a bike really turns people on. They may have a trouble saying. Ask for pics of the bikes people think look the best, irrespective of performance, and you'll get somewhere.
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:31 AM   #26
smj
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Hello Everyone,

My name is Jake. To be honest, I am a college student studying Product Design and a complete beginner to Motorcycles (only rode once on my Uncles KTM 450 MX, but I do ride quads). I am currently designing a mid to heavy weight Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle (not a mx conversion dual sport, but more like a KTM 690 or BMW G 650GS) for a Project and I would really appreciate it if you could take the time to help me out with a few questions I have!

Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.


Hi Jake, I am Steve. I ride an 07 Honda XR650R and a 2012 KTM 990 R, and have average skills. Never raced, but have been riding for ~40 years, mostly dirt bikes converted to street legal, or enduro type bikes. MX360, DT250, XT500, WR426, TT600, KLR650, XR650R, F800GS, 990R. Currently I enjoy exploring the back roads and unpaved passes here in Colorado. Don’t do much single track anymore. I ride back and forth to work, and try to ride something fun on weekends.
Jake – if you are really going to try to design a bike, you need to narrow your choices here. You state that you are interested in a mid to heavy weight bike: KTM 690 BMW 650GS. You really need to think about what type of rides you intend this bike to do. Be specific! Road work: how long, how high, twisty or straight lines, with gear or without, big gas tank, minimum comfort or much comfort? Off pavement: same questions as above, but add type to it off pavement – gravel road, mud, snow & ice, rocks (baby heads and volleyballs), ledges, hill climbs, tree roots, stream crossings, combinations?
You have set out to design a bike, and you don’t even understand its use. Hence some of the comments you’ve gotten here. I think you’d do better if you explained a ride, what would be involved, and then ask for some input. One bike won’t do it all perfect. Your design will be one of compromise, and you will have to figure out what that will entail.
That said, I’ll take a swag at your questions.

Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?
Depends on the week. Back and forth to work adds up. When I ride out, it is to find something off pavement, but ride pavement to get there. A trip to Moab is pavement out, 3 or 4 days of riding off pavement. Miles wise, probably more on pavement. Hours wise, maybe not…

What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?
Durability and suspension. Then power. But the bike has to hold up for me. I really hate it when some minor part fails, in the interest of saving a few pennies, and I end up stuck in the middle of nowhere. All the power in the world isn’t much fun when there is no suspension/handling capabilities to the bike.

What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?
When I buy a bike, it is for a specific purpose. That can change a bit each time, based on what I am thinking at the time. More road work, commute to work – then more comfort. Rocks and roots – light weight dirt bike.

What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?
As bikes get more expensive to fix, I worry a lot more about the cost should I crash.
I live for those places off the beaten path, where I can’t see another person, and the only sign of others is the trail/road I am on. Solitude. The joy of still being able to do what I enjoy, even if not the level I used to do it at.

Again, I would really appreciate your help!

Thank you!
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smj screwed with this post 03-13-2013 at 08:48 AM Reason: Had my KTM listed as a 2013 990 R, should be 2012. Sorry!
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Old 03-11-2013, 11:47 AM   #27
Grreatdog
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Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road? Even split but prefer off

What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle? Light weight, quality offroad suspension

What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one? See above but basically a street legal bike that can handle hard offroad use and abuse

What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle? Seriously? Fun
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:21 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Please start off by introducing yourself and the bike you ride, skill level or rider experience, how often you ride, what type of riding you do, and hobbies... etc.
My dual-sport bike is a 2009 KLR650, it's my first bike. This will be my fifth riding season. I do not consider myself particularly good at any type of riding, there's always lots to learn. I will ride any time there is not ice on the ground and my bike is serviceable. Most of my riding is commuting in town to work, but I enjoy taking trips and doing some (slow) trail riding with a very patient buddy of mine.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
Questions:

Do you ride your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle more On or Off the road?
On road, for sure. I'd like to ride more off-road, but I need some serious practice.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What features about the bike do you most admire or lead you to purchasing the motorcycle?
I wanted a bike that would do the following:
- wouldn't drive me to tears every time it got dropped or scratched (although I will admit the first couple of times I was a little choked up anyway).
- would let me sample a bunch of different kinds of riding
- didn't cost a ton of money (goes hand in hand with the first point in this list)
- would be a little forgiving (i.e. I wouldn't flip over backwards if I sneezed whilst opening the throttle)
- ease of service for the things I'm comfortable doing, and local shops to help me or do the things I'm not


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What do you generally look for in a motorcycle when it comes time to purchasing one?
Pretty much the same as the previous list, although I would be sure to add that there has to be good support out there. If the best mechanic in the world can't get parts, they won't be riding.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Designer Jake View Post
What type of emotions or experiences are evoked when riding your Dual Sport/Adventure motorcycle?
The bike feels alive to me when I'm riding. It "feels" like it has good days and bad days - some days it feels like the bike is eager to go places, while others it feels like it's tired and really, REALLY doesn't want to climb that next hill. Some days I feel like the KLR and I could just trundle out onto the highway and ride forever.

I enjoy the sights, meeting new people (both riders and non-riders) and how everything smells and feels so much more vivid when I'm on the bike. You don't really notice that cloud of bugs you just drove through in a car... but being on the bike adds a whole other dimension to the experience. The faint smell of cigarette smoke from that guy having a puff while he's watering his lawn... the perfume from the woman walking the two daschunds... you just don't experience that when in a car.

Riding clears my mind. Paying attention to what's going on around me and what I need to be doing leaves no time to think about work or money or how I'm going to make that deadline... even though I'm thinking hard, I'm always in a better mood and more relaxed after riding than I was before I got on the bike.

I don't enjoy driving the car, and I don't not-enjoy driving the car. I "nothing" driving the car. But the bike... it's a whole different experience for me. I can be wet, miserable, hurt, and scared, and I still feel more connected to the bike than I would to the car.

It's probably silly to anthropomorphize to this extent, but when I'm riding, the bike and I are a team.

I've been assured by a friend of mine who has been riding for 40+ years that these feelings will wear off. So far, they haven't.

Hmm... it appears I've gone on a bit. Sorry about that.
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:28 PM   #29
raebear
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Jake, just saw this thread and would like to comment. It will take a few days though, I am headed out tomorrow at 3a for a first Saddle Sore on a new bike. So I can give you a fresh perspective from an 'old rider' who just went through the process of finding the 'perfect' bike.-- wish me......... and my butt; - luck
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:20 PM   #30
Greenflyfarmer
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I think what helps a good dual sport handle well in a variety of conditions is simply a 18 inch rear wheel and a 21 inch front. A 21 inch front works in the dirt, has great feel every where and gives a added margin of safety. Keep the front just a little skinny rather than fat. That will help turning in the dirt.

Bikes that have the old dirt standard of 18/21 do better in dual sport conditions. Start there where the bike meets the road/dirt.

I'm a KTM guy, 990 and 625 SXC, riding all my life, now in my 50's.
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