ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-10-2013, 09:10 PM   #1
Bubbachicken OP
learning fast!
 
Bubbachicken's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Tennessee
Oddometer: 30
Question trying to make some decisions about touring

Hi guys and gals.

I have a minor problem. I originally was trying to decide whether to do the dolling up on my CB650C (1981) for my wife and I to do 2-up with, or whether the 650 is big enough to handle us both with modifications (but I am thinking the mods might cost more than the bigger bike, assuming I get a used bike for the touring as well).

Now, to be clear, I weigh about 280 at the moment, and she is at close to 300 and dropping as well, so we are talking about some weight here. We are both at 6 ft tall or more, so we are not tiny by any warpage of imagination. To make the process work, I would have to probably install a different seat, and I don't know about the pressure the swingarm on this bike will accomodate, nor what the shocks are going to do. I am strongly leaning to getting a bigger bike for those combination days and just making this my commuter bike. I know I don't want a massive bike to commute with, but I also know that we are not going to tour every weekend either, so the bigger bike will have limited use most likely. I am considering getting a 1970's-1980's Gold Wing or some such, but I hear they are a beast to work on, and that there are not a lot of folks that know or desire to work on them if issues are larger than what I can deal with or require specialized (read "expensive") tools. Below is the current status of my 650, but wash the bike and subtract the windshield (as I broke it the other day. I am considering replacing it or using the Windjammer I have, but that is still up in the air). The 650 is my first bike, and I have only ever been a passenger on a 'Wing. I additionally understand I need more time on the road before taking a passenger anyplace at all, regardless of WHAT it is on.



What I am wondering is if the older Gold Wing bikes (or any of the older touring size bikes with our weight situation in mind) are really that hard to deal with or if it is more just some people complaining because they keep leaving fuel in tanks and not servicing their bikes. Thoughts or opinions on this dilemma are most welcome!
Bubbachicken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 10:32 PM   #2
Steve G.
Beastly Adventurer
 
Steve G.'s Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: West is the Best
Oddometer: 6,582
You're gonna need a bigger bike Bubba. This thing will break. If you look under the seat or somewhere, there's going to be a sticker indicating GVW [gross vehicle weight]. This includes you guys and the bike as a package. I'm pretty sure this thing's GVW will max out way less than 280+300+500=1080ibs.

Plus, all loaded up, this bike will be way more unmanageable than a big bike made for big loads.
Steve G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 04:29 AM   #3
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Bend, Oregon summer, Snowbird in winter
Oddometer: 2,618
Definitely go with the Wing, and even then you may be overloading it. The Wing will take the overloading much better than the CB650. I have owned both. Good heavy duty tires and aftermarket rear shocks will be essential.

Servicing the carbs on the old Wings is a PITA because access isn't easy, but once you get them right they will stay right until you park the bike for a long period of time with old gas in it. An experienced old Wing rider will be able to tell if the carbs are right by taking a short test ride. Replace the points ignition with a Dynatech electronic ignition and you won't ever have to service that part again.
hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 04:45 AM   #4
Unstable Rider
Beyond Thunderdome
 
Unstable Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: 10,000 Lakes Minnesota
Oddometer: 2,357
Great post.

There are some bikes that are more sensitive to the handling of weight. An early Gold Wing will do many things, but if you are not used to toting a passenger, get some current road time in to get used to what ever bike you choose, and get to know how it reacts in different situations (rain, road with sand on it, leaves... quick stops..). and the run the finest tires you can afford, and keep them newish.

Maybe a Gold Wing guy will chime in, but sometime around mid to later 1980's they lowered the weight on them and they were better handling in my opinion, not as tippy when rolling it out of the garage or parking spaces. They added the "reverse" feature about that same year as I recall.

For me, I used to ride two up all the time (it was the 70's and early to mid 80s, I had hair ). I got away from motorcycles for years to recover from a back injury, and got back on one in 2010 or so. I found I don't have that inner core lower trunk strength anymore to confidently carry or be responsible for a passenger. I would seriously consider a second bike for your partner, or a bike with a sidecar, but that's just me. I would worry myself crazy with a passenger at this point in my life. People did not have cell phones when I carried a passenger last.

That would really make me stop and think twice now days.
__________________
.
-“Ah, you're wasting you're time. They can't track us over rocks. Tell them that.......... --Who are those guys?”
Unstable Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2013, 07:43 AM   #5
Bubbachicken OP
learning fast!
 
Bubbachicken's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Tennessee
Oddometer: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unstable Rider View Post
Great post.

There are some bikes that are more sensitive to the handling of weight. An early Gold Wing will do many things, but if you are not used to toting a passenger, get some current road time in to get used to what ever bike you choose, and get to know how it reacts in different situations (rain, road with sand on it, leaves... quick stops..). and the run the finest tires you can afford, and keep them newish.

Maybe a Gold Wing guy will chime in, but sometime around mid to later 1980's they lowered the weight on them and they were better handling in my opinion, not as tippy when rolling it out of the garage or parking spaces. They added the "reverse" feature about that same year as I recall.

For me, I used to ride two up all the time (it was the 70's and early to mid 80s, I had hair ). I got away from motorcycles for years to recover from a back injury, and got back on one in 2010 or so. I found I don't have that inner core lower trunk strength anymore to confidently carry or be responsible for a passenger. I would seriously consider a second bike for your partner, or a bike with a sidecar, but that's just me. I would worry myself crazy with a passenger at this point in my life. People did not have cell phones when I carried a passenger last.

That would really make me stop and think twice now days.
Thanks for this piece of info, I had not considered it yet, having two bikes with her as a pilot on one, at least not seriously. The Wing I was a passenger on so often was an 84 if I remember, and it had reverse. Maybe it is the year you are thinking of. I know its owner did not like to USE the reverse gear much, preferring to not get himself into the situation where it would be used, but it definitely had it. Seems it was pretty tough for him to control the bike well at engagement of that gear or something, I don't remember. It was almost 20 years ago, and you can imagine, memory fades...

I had not considered the sidecar issue either. I am not sure how I would feel about that at all. She is large enough that it would be tough to get in and out of one, I should think, unless it was designed from an SUV seat, and she said she would rather I was piloting so she could look around. Oh well, time to refresh that look for a bike for me I guess, and she can start out on this 650!

Thanks, HugeMouth, Steve G., and Unstable Rider for the advice. I will go with two bikes, and get her going on the 650 until she is decided on what sort of bike she wants. It will probably be more fun with two bikes on the trip anyway! At least I don't have to worry about what she wants to pack in place of my rain gear and road tools! My old tools from my shop all got left when we moved 5 years ago, but a huge box of romance novels (that she tossed in the trash because she did not want them anymore at the new house) made it just fine. She will never live THAT one down, even though I forgave her 3 years ago...

Bubbachicken screwed with this post 02-11-2013 at 07:49 AM Reason: Thanks given for responses
Bubbachicken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2013, 08:34 AM   #6
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,933
My first thought, as several have said, is a good Goldwing. And even though I'm not a Harley guy, I've run into more than one couple touring long distances two-up on big Harleys. And they are usually comfortably large folks as you profess to be. The huge dealer network throughout this country = huge support network whe you might need service work done.

I had totally forgotten the sidecar option until it was mentioned. One of my friends on here, and someone who rides several different bikes over the past few years (literally as part of his professional photog career) picked up a Victory with a hack and has found it useful and fun. Shoot a PM to GSBS and tell him I sent you searching for opinions.

Also read through the specific forum on here for sidehack info and opinions.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 11:11 AM   #7
Bubbachicken OP
learning fast!
 
Bubbachicken's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Tennessee
Oddometer: 30
Wicked

Thanks Mark.

I talked with my wife some more about this, and about everyone's replies, and she is warming to the thought of having her own bike. She may just eventually inherit this one! She actually can flat foot this bike just as reasonably as I do, so it becomes a possibility for her, plus she has much better medical insurance than I do (as I have very basic coverage-I need to up it me-thinks) so perhaps she is more suited to riding than I am at the moment! She has been asking about school the last few days, as I drilled it into her head while awaiting my course to arrive before I would even ride the bike in the yard (I stayed off until I had passed and recieved my M endorsement). I learned in MSF class that attempting to do that would assuredly produce a spill anyway, on these street tires, my grassy lawn, and this Tennessee clay (something I suspected in the first place), so it proved a good thing I waited! The experience at the course was invaluable, as well.

So, now the question becomes what sort of bike to get for the replacement one, while she learns what sort of bike she wants after riding my "old" one! It will be nice to be able to go places quasi-locally together! I sure like the Heritage Soft Tail Classics, but I cannot afford them, nor dealership maintenence fees at HD! I have to start cruising Craig's List to find another JUM again! Something I don't have to hunt for parts for would be nice... The sad part is that I am getting a minor attachment to this bike, but that she is as well!

At least we should get a lot of use out of this CB 650C. I am gonna hate painting that tank and the sidecovers lime metallic flake green, though... She wants it, so I guess "Mama Said" applies... Danged marriage license... Hey, but at least I get to pick out another bike!
Bubbachicken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2013, 03:28 PM   #8
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,933
Sounds good so far. And since she is liking a bike you already have, that's a good thing. But just a cautionary note on the opposite side of the discussion..... My GF has a high school classmate thay lives just a few blocks away. (We're talking class of '71.) She jumps into hobbies with both feet, and when she got the itch to ride she started with a HD Sportster after taking the classes etc. She felt she was having trouble keeping up with hubby and friends on their 'Glides and Softtails on long all day rides. So she did the logical thing and traded up to a V-Rod. Then her husband did the same becasue he liked her bike. After a while, she lost enthusiasm for riding and took off on another hobby, sold the bike, and I thing the husband has traded back to a more classic style Harley. The point of this anecdote is that its worth trying. But if and when it doesn't work any more, don't be afraid to step back and rethink what will make everybody happiest.

Other than that I say go for it. Hopefully folks will chime in with ideas for good bikes for you to pursue for yourself.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014