ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-15-2013, 05:32 PM   #166
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
02/06/2013 – Waterfalls and Frontera Corazal.



Besides the ruins, the area around Palenque has many other things to offer, including several impressive waterfalls. One such waterfall (which I did not visit) is Misoh-Ha, where Arnold took the leap to escape “The Predator”. I wanted to see it, but it was not in the cards. The waterfall we did go to though was the famous Agua Azul (blue waters). It was a bit of a backtrack, but the day was nice and held promise of a pleasant swim.

Riding...




The ride to the falls was uneventful, retracing our steps along some curvy mountain roads. The falls however were beautiful. Agua Azul is a series of cascades and turquoise pools. Similar to Semuc Champey in Guatemala, but completely surrounded by vendor stalls and food stands. If I had to choose between the two, Semuc Champey would be the winner hands down, but Agua Azul is very nice too. There are two swimming areas at the falls; the lower part with something resembling a beach and an upper section that is a bit of a hike to reach, but well worth it. There were only a few people in the upper section and the water felt great after the short hike in the sun and heat.

Agua Azul.








After a nice swim we left the falls and headed south through the jungle on Mex 307 (once we back-backtracked to the intersection near Palenque) along the Mexican-Guatemala border to the town of Frontera Corozal. From there you can reach the riverfront Mayan ruins of Yaxchilan, but only by boat. From the same town you can take a boat south (upstream) to Bethel and cross the border into Guatemala (although there is no vehicle check-out/in at this border crossing). We arrived towards evening and grabbed some bunks at a pretty nice guesthouse called Nueva Alianza. (On road photos by Laura)

Mex 307 through the jungle.




It's beginning to look a lot like Guatemala...






Kids selling snacks at the topes (where you have to slow down).




That evening we had a debate about our immediate future plans. Laura was in a hurry to get to Costa Rica to see friends and work with turtles. I wanted to take my time and see everything. We compromised (Laura decided not “to be so German” in her words) on taking it easy the next day and going by boat to see the ruins, and then cross the border (also by boat) the day after instead of trying to do both on the same day. Not sure if we could have puled that off so I'm very glad we didn't have to try. I like things easy and stress free. I did decide to leave the Yucatan and Belize for the way back though (if there's time...).

Nueva Alianza.


__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 05:32 PM   #167
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
02/07/2013 – Running the river to Yaxchilan.

It was really nice to have a relaxed morning, just drinking some coffee and reading a book for a bit. Sometimes even though I'm on vacation, it's hard to find down time. It seems like I'm always busy going somewhere or doing something or planning what to do next. I've downloaded several movies and I'm two issues behind in “The Walking Dead” comic series, but I can't seem to find the time for them. This morning I found some time (although I still didn't read the comics or watch the movies).





Late morning we finally got going to the boats that took us to the ruins. After some tough negotiations we managed to get a good deal (500 pesos, still the most expensive ruins) on boat travel there, two hours at the ruins (which is not enough time, but for some reason is the standard amount of time given) and the return trip. I (and by “I” I mean Laura as she speaks Spanish well) also asked around about taking the bike on the boat north to Bethel for the border crossing. We got a really good deal on that too without even much haggling (300 pesos for us and the bike).



The boat trip down stream took about 40 minutes. The day was nice and the scenery was beautiful. The river was really high and a dark brown color, but I imagine if it was lower and there were beaches, I could have seen some crocs sunning themselves (maybe?).

Here's looking at you, kids..


Laura.


Captain my captain.

I don't take enough pictures of people...

We spent the two hours at the ruins diligently exploring and trying to see as much as possible. I think three hours is a more realistic time frame for getting the complete picture of this place. We did see howler monkeys and managed to at least get a cursory look at all three main areas. One interesting feature of these ruins I didn't see at many others (aside from being on the bank of a river) is the extensive network of tunnels that we were able to explore. Apparently they are home to the smallest species of bat on earth (according to a guide I overheard). The tunnels are also home to rather large spiders and other creepy crawlers.

Yaxchilan Ruinas.




Howler monkeys, yay.




And more ruins...




Smallest bat ever?


This guy is >18 in. (with legs)...












Ball court.








Giant tree.

Okay enough ruins pictures already...

The trip back from the ruins was pretty and took less time than expected. Overall it was a great experience and I'm glad we took a day to do some exploring. When we got back to Frontera Corozal we rode around town looking for a nice local place to have our last dinner in Mexico. After exploring town for a bit, getting various directions to places that didn't exist and attempting to eat at places that were closed, we finally found a restaurant that suited our needs. It was advertised as a restaurant outside, but what we found once we went in was a house with a family watching television. We sat at their dinner table and had a delicious home cooked meal. What a great way to say Adios to Mexico.

__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 03:31 PM   #168
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
02/08/2013 – Bienvenidos a Guatemala.

We had a long way to go and the border crossing would be potentially time consuming so we got an early start in the morning. After a quick breakfast we rode down to the river and found our guide who we negotiated with the day before. Now, there are two ways down to the river from the office, a road made specifically for cars and trucks (the easy way) right to the water, and a winding walkway, followed by a staircase and then a sandy beach for pedestrians. For some unfathomable reason, I had to ride down the walkway/staircase instead of the road to get to our boat.

Down the stairs.


On the beach.


F'ing heavy bike! (but no BMW GS)




It took four guys to load the bike into the small motorboat that was taking us upstream to Bethel, where we were entering Guatemala. Once again I found a good reason to change up bikes for something lighter. Not only would it have made the walkway down easier, but the loading would have been a breeze in comparison. It still wasn't bad though (which argues for keeping the bike [I mean how often do I load it into a boat anyway?]). I tried to tie the bike down with the end of the rope not attached to the front of the boat, but wasn't very successful so I ended up having to sit on the bike while we made our way upstream. Overall a fine adventure.







When we got to Bethel about a half hour later, we were again faced with the hassle of lifting the heavy ass bike to get it to the bank. This time there were less people on hand so an old Guatemalan lady helped out. It was a little embarrassing to need her, but we did. I gave the guys and the old woman a good tip for the assistance once the bike was safely on dry land. We exchanged some pesos for quetzales with an older woman who was waiting at the boat launch for someone just like us. After some negotiations I actually got a rate better than I have seen since. Pesos are not popular in Guatemala and the exchange rate when compared to dollars is abysmal (the rate is about 8 quetzales to the dollar, but going through pesos it was closer to 6 to one dollar). We rode over to immigration on the outskirts of town and had our passports promptly stamped by a really nice officer who couldn't care less about the bike (no Aduano here). Two other officers came over to check out the bike and shake our hands, but import paperwork was not discussed.

Guatemala!!


The ride from Bethel to the nearest pavement was interesting. The road was dirt and varied from relatively smooth to outright dangerous (for the bike). I thought for sure all kinds of parts were going to vibrate loose and I was really glad I did the drill-through subframe upgrade on the bike before I left. Riding two-up with the extra luggage I was even a little worried with the upgrade. But when we reached pavement after about 50 Kms of rough road all was well, and the pavement sure felt great! The road took us through some jungle and cultivated fields with occasional mud and wood shacks and villages along the way. The people here are pretty poor, but seem happy.







Hurrah for pavement!




Some distance after reaching the pavement we had to cross a river by ferry. I remembered being here a few years ago with my friend on the bus having to go pee so bad she almost lost it, but the bus driver wouldn't stop. Good times. There were no issues this time around and I made a couple of friends on the short ferry ride when I took some pictures of their bikes, and they of mine.

Ferry crossing north of Sayaxché.






Through the jungle.


And cultivated fields.




And mountains.














We reached Cobán by late afternoon and stopped at the bus station so Laura could check the schedule to see if she could make it to Guatemala City tonight and Costa Rica in a couple of days. There was no way I was getting there in any reasonable amount of time and she was in a hurry. The bus was leaving in five minutes so we said our goodbyes, she grabbed her things and took off. It was a great adventure and a lot of fun. I will miss you Laura! As it was getting late I tried to find a place to stay the night in Cobán with no luck. All the places listed in my outdated Lonely-Planet pdf were either non-existent or closed down. After riding around town for about an hour and even asking some Mormons (who didn't know of a place, but assured me I couldn't stay at their house [not that I had any desire to ]) I decided to press on.

More mountain roads.






I rode as far as Tactic and found a nice hotel in the center of town. It was just getting dark. Guatemala is a beautiful country to ride in. So far it's been all curvy mountain roads and good pavement (once I was off the original dirt). The scenery is fantastic and the people are really nice and friendly. It isn't as cheap as I though it was going to be though. About the same as Mexico, but I remember it being dirt cheap the last time I was here. Perhaps elsewhere in the country...

__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 07:45 PM   #169
Pete_Tallahassee
Out Standing Member
 
Pete_Tallahassee's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee. FL. USA
Oddometer: 135
"It was a great adventure and a lot of fun. I will miss you Laura!"
I'll miss her too!

How about quoting some prices of food and accommodations?

Great pictures and writing.
Pete_Tallahassee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2013, 09:21 AM   #170
drifter dave
Gnarly Adventurer
 
drifter dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: BC, Canada
Oddometer: 134
I love Guatemala. It certainly is cheap enough if you shop around. Hotels listed in the guides will cost more. I can remember staying in Flores on the lake, 2 beds for $9/night CDN. Not bad. Safe travels.
__________________
Vancouver to Belize and back:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=544121
drifter dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2013, 06:09 PM   #171
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete_Tallahassee View Post
"It was a great adventure and a lot of fun. I will miss you Laura!"
I'll miss her too!

How about quoting some prices of food and accommodations?
Thanks Pete!

Yes, we will all miss her! I'll have to find a new star for this show

I'll try to include prices for accommodations, but I rarely talk about food or keep good specific track of the costs (although I have a general idea of what it costs day to day). I can include that if you'd like, similar to John in his excellent "South America and back on a 250 Super Sherpa Minimalist Adventure" RR. (free plug for a great RR!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by drifter dave View Post
I love Guatemala. It certainly is cheap enough if you shop around. Hotels listed in the guides will cost more. I can remember staying in Flores on the lake, 2 beds for $9/night CDN. Not bad. Safe travels.
Very true. Guatemala might be my favorite CA country (not that I rank them ) Three years ago I stayed in Flores for $6 a night (I was on a <$20 a day budget ). In Xela now, my accommodations are $4.60 a night for my own room (shared bathroom). I see postings with monthly rent for about 800 quetzales ($100 bucks). I think I'm spending too much on food, but I'm sick of tacos so I've been eating foreign (Thai, Indian, Mediterranean, Italian... ) But it's definitely not bad!
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2013, 06:41 PM   #172
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
02/09/2013 – Riding to Panajachel on Lake Atitlán.

My general plan for Guatemala was to get to Lake Atitlán, pick a town and study Spanish for a couple of weeks. The area around Lake Atitlán came highly recommended, but as I discovered, it's not conducive to learning Spanish. I think I've gone as far as I can trying to learn it on my own. I can say all the basics, but I know I'm saying it all wrong and no one will correct me since I make myself understood (for the most part). It would be nice to be able to say things the right way though, so Spanish lessons are on the agenda.

Some secure parking in Tactic, Hotel Villa Linda.


After having desayuno tipico (fried eggs, beans, fried plantains, sour cream and coffee) around the corner from the hotel, I took off on a full days' ride. I needed to go approximately 325 Kms today to reach Panajachel, which included passing through Guatemala City (renown for it's traffic and not too easy to navigate). The morning was sunny and warm; the overcast skies from yesterday were history.

Beautiful mountain roads.














Cerratera peligrosa.


I rode through the mountains and then descended into hot dry desert. Mid morning it was time for gas and a cup of coffee. I stopped at a random gas station with reasonable gas prices (although more expensive than Mexico). The stations here are corporate owned (Shell, BP, Texaco) not government controlled like in Mexico, so prices vary from station to station. After gas I pulled up to the cafe for a cup of coffee, and parked just out of sight was a brand spanking new 2012 GS R1200. The owner is a Swedish chap (if I recall correctly) who shared a conversation with me over coffee. Alas, I don't remember his name and he is one of the few bikers I met who is not on Advrider. I suspect he might join as he seemed really interested and was already familiar with Horizons Unlimited (I pitched this forum as superior in certain ways, but told him that's just my opinion [it's not a competition]).

Getting hot.








Bike photo of the way.




Very cool BMW Rider. (anyone know him?)


After a nice chat I continued on my way to Guatemala City and beyond. Getting into the city was no problem, getting out the other side caused me more difficulty. There's not really a straight path down a major road. I needed to get onto the CA-1 but it was like threading a series of needles with a camel holding the thread in his teeth (does that even make sense?). There were all kinds of convoluted turns in order to get from one road to the other and not a sign in sight. My GPS tells me where I am, but won't even hint at where to go, so I mostly had to guess. After seeing many parts of the city I didn't really care to (okay, it was actually fun, to be honest), I finally made it onto the CA-1 and continued towards Lake Atitlán and Panajachel.



Entering Guatemala City.




Self portrait (all alone ).


One more crappy photo:


Once past the city it was an easy and rather pretty ride to the turn off for Panajachel and the long descent to the lake. I made it there well before dark, but it took quite a bit of time to find a cheap place to stay. I knew the lake was touristy, but I had no idea how expensive it would be. Every place I tried was charging hundreds of quetzales (~$25-$30)! After many misleading directions, I found a place (with parking, which was tricky) for 100 quetzales. It was a nice place and not too far from the center, but down a side road a bit. I was tired so I just grabbed some food, watched a movie and called it a night.

Out the other side.




Back towards the mountains.








Lake Atitlán in the distance.




Panajachel.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2013, 09:28 AM   #173
drifter dave
Gnarly Adventurer
 
drifter dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: BC, Canada
Oddometer: 134
Awesome dude!
Thanks for bringing back such great memories :)
__________________
Vancouver to Belize and back:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=544121
drifter dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 08:08 AM   #174
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by drifter dave View Post
Awesome dude!
Thanks for bringing back such great memories :)
No problem man. Thanks for coming along!

What?!? You sold your dr350 for a KLR? That's so funny how the grass is always greener. I keep vacillating between keeping the KLR and getting the dr350. How do you feel about your decision after your trip? I read you RR. Looks like you made it about as far as me so far. Looks like I might not make it much further than you did

Tentative announcement: I may not get much further! Running out of time and I intend to stay here (in Xela) longer than expected. I might make it into El Salvador and I'll explore Belize, but almost definitely not all the way to Panama. Looks like I'll be back next winter to finish the trip
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 09:12 AM   #175
johnsonal
avenger of all evil
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: here today, gone tomorrow
Oddometer: 103
advrider, from oregon, in guatemala....
me too, in antigua now, lets get a beer if you're still around
johnsonal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 02:13 PM   #176
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
02/10/2013 – Around Lake Atitlán and my first police escort!

Posada Casa Rosa, Panajachel.


Lake Atitlán is beautiful and I wanted to spend some time exploring it. So I woke up early and headed out, or at least that was my intent. Before I could leave Panajachel, I needed to use an ATM as the smaller towns are more limited in that regard (some have no ATMs at all and you need to take a boat to another town to get cash). However, since it was Sunday getting money became a real chore. I went to several ATMs all of which were either broken or had no money. I eventually found one behind some metal bars (it looked out of order) that actually had cash left! Thrilled, I got on the bike and rode south and east, clockwise around the lake.











The road curved around the lake with many beautiful vistas, and eventually turned to dirt. I must have missed a turn-off somewhere, because it soon became near-impassable by car and on my GPS it ended just out of sight. I don't really trust the GPS (for the record: I'm using open street maps and the ENTIRE lake is missing from these maps. The boat routes across the lake look like roads on dry ground, which can be confusing when trying to navigate). As I suspected, the road continued on and eventually met up with a very nicely paved highway that rounded the lake at higher elevation, but in the meantime I had to ride some pretty difficult dirt, deep dust and baby-head boulders. It was challenging, but fun! The quality of the road varied greatly from one place to the next, but until after Santiago Atitlán, the worst was over.

Road begins to deteriorate.










Daily bike pic.




Dirt road winding around and up. Not too bad yet... but no photos of the worst part as I was too busy trying to stay up.












Santiago Atitlán was a mess of construction and detours. It was also market day which made exploring more interesting, but navigating more difficult. After passing through Santiago Atitlán, the road veered away from the lake and behind Volcán San Pedro. I rode probably 5 Kms out of town and stopped to take some pictures when I was approached by a group of locals (mostly kids and a couple of adults). Through a series of broken sentences and hand signs it was explained to me that the road ahead was serious bandito territory and it was extremely likely that I would be robbed at gunpoint if I continued onward. At first I didn't believe it, but they seemed pretty serious so I returned to Santiago Atitlán to verify this story with the police. Apparently the locals weren't kidding! Once I got my story across (which took some doing [glad I'm going to learn some Spanish]) the police informed me that the road was extremely dangerous (armed robberies on a very regular basis) and anyone traveling that route got a free police escort. They made some calls and told me there would be a unit waiting to escort me to San Pedro.















Santiago detour.






Before riding the peligrosa (dangerous) road, I stashed a bunch of cash and my photo card in various secret places on the off chance that the cops don't come through or, worst yet, that they're in on it. So unfortunately I wasn't able to take any photos of the most brutal road I've ridden to date (so brutal that for the first time ever I dumped the bike, luckily when the cops were too far back to see ***). The police met me as promised and followed me around Volcán San Pedro, a very beautiful road. There was a short section, maybe 5 or 8 Kms of dirt climbing around hairpin turns in deep dust/sand with medium sized boulders. This is where the banditos get you because it's impossible to ride away! I, however, saw no banditos and all was well.

Outside Santiago.


These kids rode over to warn me of banditos! Thanks!!




The cops here are friendly and safe (which may come as a surprise to many). Thanks!!


When I got to San Pedro La Laguna (famous for hippies and drugs) I reinstalled my photo card and moved on as my destination was San Marcos, further around the lake. The road was paved and the riding was easy. I made my way to San Pablo where I saw an old, beat up KLR and some sort of 80's 550 sitting outside a restaurant. The KLR belonged to Stephen, who was on his way to Panama when he got stuck in San Pedro a year and half ago (Stephen lurks here on advrider, but I don't know his handle). The 550 belonged to “Winter” who was here with John (on another KLR) doing the first of a series of 12 documentaries about volunteer work and travel (see http://adventureforchange.com). We chatted a bit then I followed them to San Marcos as Stephen works at the only hostel with parking; Hostel Del Lago (highly recommended!).

Cruising past San Pedro. I'll visit later.




San Pablo where I met Stephen and Winter.




The hostel is really great. Right on the lake with a small beach, staffed by really good people and a social crowd hanging out. I got a dorm bed for 35 quetzales (it's less even if you commit to several days). After settling in a bit I went out to a great curry dinner, but was shocked by the number of hippies and rainbows hanging out in town (the town actually really grew on me and I was sad to leave when I did. Another place one can get stuck indefinitely! Example: Stephen). San Marcos La Laguna consists of a few paved footpaths on the hillside leading down to the lake. On the map it looked like roads, but there was no way I was reaching my intended hostel on the bike so I'm extra glad I ran into Stephen along the way!

John and Winter at the hostel.


My dorm: Hostel Del Lago.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 02:20 PM   #177
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsonal View Post
advrider, from oregon, in guatemala....
me too, in antigua now, lets get a beer if you're still around
Hey John! I'm in Xela and will be here a while. Are you coming this way? Let's get a beer either way. I haven't been to Antigua in a few years (my last visit to Guat) so it would be cool to cruise by. Kinda getting stuck in Xela for a while...
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 06:38 AM   #178
NotAllWhoWanderRLost
Lost
 
NotAllWhoWanderRLost's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: Bend, Oregon
Oddometer: 434
Thumb Looks like fun!

I'm glad to see your still enjoying yourself and having what looks like a great time! Thanks for sharing the amazing scenery around Lake Atitlán. It's a beautiful area and easy to see why someone could tend to hang out for a while...
NotAllWhoWanderRLost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 09:42 AM   #179
PPCLI-Jim
Gnarly Adventurer
 
PPCLI-Jim's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Victoria BC where I ride year round.
Oddometer: 220
Great RR . I like the pics. I am laying In stocks to duplicate what you are doing and one of my upgrades from a Garmin 76CX is to a Montana so when I take a snap shot like yours others could know where I was Literally. IE all of the good places and all of the Bad places . I was wondering if there would be a thread / RR where someone used a Garmin Montana would post pics that also have the GPS data included. that way even without saving a massive track of 5000 + miles there would be a route .
__________________
I'm not saying to kill all the stupid people . .. Just remove the warning labels and let nature run it's course


http://www.youtube.com/user/spudhead/videos?view=0 my youtube channel
PPCLI-Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 11:35 AM   #180
Pete_Tallahassee
Out Standing Member
 
Pete_Tallahassee's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee. FL. USA
Oddometer: 135
"Kinda getting stuck in Xela for a while... "

So let's see her picture.

Great photos of the lake.
Pete_Tallahassee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014