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Old 03-01-2013, 02:16 PM   #931
ohgood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CatSailor View Post
Usually in the spring or summer my friends start bringing their engines to my garage that have been sitting since last summer. Usually a 6" section of stripped multi conductor lamp cord does the trick. Depending on the size of the clogged jet, 1-3 strands twisted and GENTLY worked through the jets gets the problem fixed.

Blind bearing removal w/o a puller: pack the recess behind the bearing, place a shaft in the center of the bearing and hit it with a hammer. The bearing will pop out.

A foiled gum wrapper wrapped shiny side out around an old buss type fuse will get you home - fix the reason of the blown fuse 1st!
hydraulics are awesome stuff. thanks for posting this, i had forgotten.

(years ago i watch in amazement as a 15 ton propeller was stretched and pressed onto to a shaft, all at once)
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:28 PM   #932
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Originally Posted by cat View Post
Until you get up and kick it.
you've seen me in the garage ? wthell ? lol


ya, i quit with pie pans, now it's either:

a) 5 gallon bucket (tire changes, all tools AND parts inside)
b) ziplocks (oily parts, lots of them
c) duct tape, peal a strip off and put each part in the next space. re-assembly = reverse it
d) magnetic ashtray
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:47 PM   #933
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Wow! Now i'm curious ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohgood View Post
hydraulics are awesome stuff ...

(years ago i watch in amazement as a 15 ton propeller was stretched and pressed onto to a shaft, all at once)

ohgood, hi!

Hope you don't mind me asking, but how did they actually do that, stretching and pressing the propeller on?

You've piqued my curiosity.

Thanks,


Liz
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Old 03-02-2013, 06:09 PM   #934
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I haven't read the entire thread, so forgive me if any of this is 205

I have a thermarest pad I lay on the garage floor whenever I need to lay down next to the bike to change the oil, check the tires, whatever. Way better than lying on concrete.

My bike is supposed to be upright when the oil is checked, but doesn't have a centerstand. I got a small mirror with a telescoping handle, so I can check the oil while sitting on the bike. I got it from Sears.

Before I work on the bike, I always sweep the garage floor. That makes it a lot easier to find that washer I always drop.
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:22 AM   #935
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Originally Posted by mrbreeze View Post
Before I work on the bike, I always sweep the garage floor. That makes it a lot easier to find that washer I always drop.
+1, your the first other person I have heard that does this, also, sweeping the dirt away keeps anything that hits the floor from picking up dirt, parts/tools/your body/that rag your supposed to be cleaning stuff with ect...
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:51 AM   #936
Tom S
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+1, your the first other person I have heard that does this ...
I think most people do. Hardly a ‘trick’.
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Old 03-03-2013, 07:31 AM   #937
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I think most people do. Hardly a ‘trick’.
My trick is old carpet runners under the bike. Sops the oil spills and dampens the falling washers/bolts....they don't go so far.

No need to sweep, the ShopVac is always close by. I should go shopvac the bike maybe I'll find that SS fastener I dropped a couple days ago around the radiators.
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:05 AM   #938
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Originally Posted by H96669 View Post
No need to sweep, the ShopVac is always close by. I should go shopvac the bike maybe I'll find that SS fastener I dropped a couple days ago around the radiators.
Invert a sock or piece of pantyhose over the end of the vacuum to catch the fastener.
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:24 AM   #939
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Originally Posted by MsLizVt View Post

ohgood, hi!

Hope you don't mind me asking, but how did they actually do that, stretching and pressing the propeller on?

You've piqued my curiosity.

Thanks,


Liz
ill dig up some cool stuff when I get home :)
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Old 03-04-2013, 11:14 AM   #940
H96669
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Invert a sock or piece of pantyhose over the end of the vacuum to catch the fastener.
Nauseum tent screening material....last much longer and better at filtering the juice from the parts washer.

Set of micro brushes/reaching tools, best thing you can buy for them shopvacs, then you can use it on the computer.
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Old 03-04-2013, 03:03 PM   #941
MsLizVt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohgood View Post
ill dig up some cool stuff when I get home :)



Great! Thanks!

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Old 03-05-2013, 06:56 AM   #942
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohgood View Post

c) duct tape, peal a strip off and put each part in the next space. re-assembly = reverse it


Watched a professional rebuild front forks from an MX bike. He put all the valving in order on a safety lock pin.
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:29 PM   #943
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MsLizVt View Post



Great! Thanks!


ok, i'll dig up old pictures...

this is a fairly large prop/wheel, depends on the person calling it:


(and my super sexay gs500, ahhh, great bike)


which has a bored taper fit. the fit is checked against the mating taper on the prop shaft (which you can see on the end of the long hanging prop shaft at the beginning of the video, to the LEFT)

http://s33.beta.photobucket.com/user...tml?sort=3&o=4

that may/may not have heavy threads, which DO NOT hold the prop on, but are only used for assembly for what we're discussing:
http://s33.beta.photobucket.com/user...tml?sort=3&o=4

pre- measure distance from end of prop shaft to prop face, record...

1) check prop taper with blueing dye, against shaft taper, by hoisting the prop even with the shaft, then SLAM it into the shaft (4-5 guys push hard as hell)
2) if 90% or so contact is found, assemble the prop+shaft, then the heavy nut, to prevent the prop falling off from hydraulic pressure...
3) pipe thread were drilled and tapped into the prop, and port-a-power hand jacks are used to put pressure on the nut towards the special seal between nut/prop.
...sorry, no pretty pictures...
4) after 2000 or so psi is achieved, an electric/hydraulic pump is attached to the MIDDLE of the prop, in similar tapped pipe thread holes. shit tonnes (metric, not imperial !) of pressure are applied, i don't recall how much.
5) temperature readings are taken on the prop, and fluid leaks from around the seal and taper, it's inevitable. remember, a shit tonne of pressure here.

as the pressure builds, the fluid heats up, the prop heats up also, and it swells. the area of swelling is somewhere around 3-4 feet long by 3-4 feet wide, stainless or whatever the material is of the prop. after x amount of time (usually determined by 2 engineers and a crusty ship yard worker) a measurement is taken from the end of the shaft to the prop face again. if it's moved up the shaft enough, it's considered 'done' and mechanically 'shrunk' into place.

6) the prop, shaft, and oil is given time to cool.

7) the pressure is relesaed from the prop's hydraulic lines, and the temperature drops again with the pressure.

8) pressure is maintained on the seal and nut for a few hours, and the shaft+prop is rotated by the crane + belts to allow all the oil to drain, if any, from the prop / shaft taper. there should be little to none at this point. it's a metal to metal taper. (remember the blueing check?)

9) indicators (the apprentices, cause mine are nice!) are installed on the fore/aft faces of the prop, and the fore/aft faces of the prop are struck (understandment) with HUGE sledge hammers by big guys. any movement is a failure, and the process is repeated from step one.

10) pressure is released from the seal/nut, the nut is 'torqued' with a 12' cheater pole (no shit) and a crane, until the assembly turns from the stress. this is 'tight'.

11) much beer is drunk, pictures taken, and a new 1/2 a million dollar prop shaft is ready for delivery to some ocean going vessel, AFTER the insurers agree it's 'good'.


sorry i don't have more pictures. that was a while ago, and a very very very busy time.

i have mucho respect for lifetime mechanics and shipbuilders. they are hardasses for a reason.

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Old 03-05-2013, 06:32 PM   #944
geolpilot
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Good old STP oil treatment is VERY slippery stuff. It is excellent for getting recalcitrant hoses onto fittings, shock bushings installed and other rubber to metal problems. My aircraft mechanics also used it for assembly lube on engines. It is slick and thick.
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Old 03-05-2013, 07:24 PM   #945
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There are some great ideas in this thread.

I was wondering if anyone had some good suggestions for how to store a parts bike in a 2 car garage, with no wheels, whithout disassembly, and without taking up floor space?

I have considered hoisting it up to one of the large rafters in my garage, but the big rafter/ overhead joist support runs right down the center of the main work space, and I would not be able to get it above head height..

Any suggestions or ideas would be appreciated.
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