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Old 03-05-2013, 08:26 PM   #946
ttpete
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geolpilot View Post
Good old STP oil treatment is VERY slippery stuff. It is excellent for getting recalcitrant hoses onto fittings, shock bushings installed and other rubber to metal problems. My aircraft mechanics also used it for assembly lube on engines. It is slick and thick.
If a hose won't go over a hose barb without STP, you're doing something wrong. Go ahead and use it on a tire bead and see how long it takes to rip the valve stem out of the tube. The point is that it makes it very easy for parts to DISassemble themselves. It works very well on 2 stroke premix fuel to help with piston scuffing. We used it back in the 1960s for that purpose.
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Old 03-05-2013, 08:58 PM   #947
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Originally Posted by geolpilot View Post
Good old STP oil treatment is VERY slippery stuff. It is excellent for getting recalcitrant hoses onto fittings, shock bushings installed and other rubber to metal problems. My aircraft mechanics also used it for assembly lube on engines. It is slick and thick.
I use the heat gun for convincing hoses to go where
I want them.
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Old 03-06-2013, 05:31 AM   #948
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:00 AM   #949
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When doing an oil change (on whatever), as you are getting your tools and drain pails 'n stuff together, take the minute and go downstairs and bring up the big bag of clay cat litter that the ex-GF inadvertantly bought (I use clumping), and put the bag of clay litter next to your work area.

This will guarentee that you don't do any major spill'age.

(YMMV)

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Old 03-06-2013, 06:22 AM   #950
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. . . . go downstairs and bring up the big bag of clay cat litter that the ex-GF inadvertantly bought (I use clumping) . . . .


Mark
Wait . . . you pee in the cat box?
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:26 AM   #951
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Wait . . . you pee in the cat box?

Why not? The plastic yellow buckets make for great storage for containing water, soil, tools (not all at once though.)

The only downside is that they do not recycle.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:45 AM   #952
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Wait . . . you pee in the cat box?
Doesn't everyone who has cats? I thought it was common.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:17 AM   #953
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Not a cat guy, so I've no data . . . . . .

since I've got a bucket of oil dry (cheap cat litter) in the Entropy Lab, I'll be able to skip going outside in teh cold to take a leak . . . . thanks for the tip!
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:29 AM   #954
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Very cool ...

ohgood, hi!

Thank you for the explanation! I didn't realize that the hydraulic pressure would also create heat like that. Am I understanding that right?


Liz




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Originally Posted by ohgood View Post
ok, i'll dig up old pictures...

this is a fairly large prop/wheel, depends on the person calling it:


(and my super sexay gs500, ahhh, great bike)


which has a bored taper fit. the fit is checked against the mating taper on the prop shaft (which you can see on the end of the long hanging prop shaft at the beginning of the video, to the LEFT)

http://s33.beta.photobucket.com/user...tml?sort=3&o=4

that may/may not have heavy threads, which DO NOT hold the prop on, but are only used for assembly for what we're discussing:
http://s33.beta.photobucket.com/user...tml?sort=3&o=4

pre- measure distance from end of prop shaft to prop face, record...

1) check prop taper with blueing dye, against shaft taper, by hoisting the prop even with the shaft, then SLAM it into the shaft (4-5 guys push hard as hell)
2) if 90% or so contact is found, assemble the prop+shaft, then the heavy nut, to prevent the prop falling off from hydraulic pressure...
3) pipe thread were drilled and tapped into the prop, and port-a-power hand jacks are used to put pressure on the nut towards the special seal between nut/prop.
...sorry, no pretty pictures...
4) after 2000 or so psi is achieved, an electric/hydraulic pump is attached to the MIDDLE of the prop, in similar tapped pipe thread holes. shit tonnes (metric, not imperial !) of pressure are applied, i don't recall how much.
5) temperature readings are taken on the prop, and fluid leaks from around the seal and taper, it's inevitable. remember, a shit tonne of pressure here.

as the pressure builds, the fluid heats up, the prop heats up also, and it swells. the area of swelling is somewhere around 3-4 feet long by 3-4 feet wide, stainless or whatever the material is of the prop. after x amount of time (usually determined by 2 engineers and a crusty ship yard worker) a measurement is taken from the end of the shaft to the prop face again. if it's moved up the shaft enough, it's considered 'done' and mechanically 'shrunk' into place.

6) the prop, shaft, and oil is given time to cool.

7) the pressure is relesaed from the prop's hydraulic lines, and the temperature drops again with the pressure.

8) pressure is maintained on the seal and nut for a few hours, and the shaft+prop is rotated by the crane + belts to allow all the oil to drain, if any, from the prop / shaft taper. there should be little to none at this point. it's a metal to metal taper. (remember the blueing check?)

9) indicators (the apprentices, cause mine are nice!) are installed on the fore/aft faces of the prop, and the fore/aft faces of the prop are struck (understandment) with HUGE sledge hammers by big guys. any movement is a failure, and the process is repeated from step one.

10) pressure is released from the seal/nut, the nut is 'torqued' with a 12' cheater pole (no shit) and a crane, until the assembly turns from the stress. this is 'tight'.

11) much beer is drunk, pictures taken, and a new 1/2 a million dollar prop shaft is ready for delivery to some ocean going vessel, AFTER the insurers agree it's 'good'.


sorry i don't have more pictures. that was a while ago, and a very very very busy time.

i have mucho respect for lifetime mechanics and shipbuilders. they are hardasses for a reason.

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Old 03-07-2013, 04:38 PM   #955
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...I have a thermarest pad I lay on the garage floor whenever I need to lay down next to the bike to change the oil, check the tires, whatever. Way better than lying on concrete.

...
Patio furniture cushions also work well for this.
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:55 PM   #956
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Patio furniture cushions also work well for this.
I've owned a creeper for many years.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:13 PM   #957
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I keep large cardboard boxes, flatten them out, and use them to lie on and soak up spilled fluids. One flat screen TV box lasts a long time.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:43 PM   #958
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Originally Posted by EvilClown View Post
Patio furniture cushions also work well for this.
so does the wife's old yoga mat
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:57 PM   #959
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I've owned a creeper for many years.
That'll work, too, but mine kills my knees just as much as the floor does.

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Old 03-07-2013, 06:54 PM   #960
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MsLizVt
ohgood, hi!

Thank you for the explanation! I didn't realize that the hydraulic pressure would also create heat like that. Am I understanding that right?


Liz
I really don't know about this particular process. I know everything else under extreme pressure gets hot. bend a spoon, it warms up. bend 20000 times the amount of metal, I'm guessing it gets hotter. :)
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