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Old 03-05-2013, 10:19 PM   #16
jonnyc21
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Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Boise aria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ccino View Post
I fitted a couple of these tyres several months ago and because my rims are old and battered ('90 Fantic 307) fitted them with tubes in. They are a definite improvement on the very old and worn (rounded) Dunlops they replaced, but can't help feeling the Dunlops were more "compliant" and grippy on dry rock, and it's only the newness of the fresh square knobs on Pirellis making them seem better on grass and over logs.
A fellow rider commented on the lack of grip my tyres were (not) displaying at the weekends club event, as I struggled on almost every (dry clean rocky) section and I have a feeling he was perplexed as to how I could make sections so fundamental for them, look so goddamn difficult for myself ! but I also think he may have been trying to be kind to me by looking for any reason apart from my lack of ability.
Running the rear right down at 2psi still had it feeling quite hard in the side wall compared to others' obviously softer tyres (sorry, dont know what they were rolling).
I wouldn't expect the stiffer side walls on a DOT approved MT43 to give as much grip on a light trials bike as they would enduro or dual sport. They just wouldn't flex as much with such low weight, wouldn't conform to the ground surface right.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 03-06-2013, 04:29 AM   #17
2whlrcr
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I've run the Pirelli's on my dirt bikes off and on over the last 5 or 6 years. They are a good option on a TRAIL bike, especially in rocky conditions. They hold up better than the Dunlops or Michelin's and you can ride on them flat, if you have too.

Conversely, I think they suck on a real trials bike. I'll stick to Dunlops or Michelin's.
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:41 PM   #18
Gordo83
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On the same subject of rear tires. Can anyone tell me the difference or compare the Michelin Competition Radial and the Michelin X Light Radial tire, other than the latter weighs a pound less. Has anyone here used both or either and have an opinion?
Thanks
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:47 PM   #19
Sting32
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It is not exactly what you wanted but I use the X lights. before that I use the Dunlops and I R C's. I guess I'm not sure what you're asking I don't know I would pay full price for a Michelin regular radio when I can buy a Dunlop or IRC for 2 thirds price?

And competition I really like the X lights. But I do say, they wear funny. I think the rubber they save is right below the Nobbies? When my ex lights start leaking around the Nobbies that's when I buy a new tire about once a year.

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Old 03-07-2013, 11:38 AM   #20
Gordo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyc21 View Post
The guy I picked up my Montesa 4RT from put new Dunlops on it (D803) on it isn't bad, but, I do like the Michelin Competition on my wifes TXT Pro a bit better. Just my 2 cents...
I was thinking jonnyc21 was talking about the regular Michelin, not the X Light. So I was wondering if anyone had tried both. I also see that Michelin makes a tubetype tire for the older rims. I'm assuming they are the same other than the bead area.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:07 PM   #21
lamotovita
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordo83 View Post
I was thinking jonnyc21 was talking about the regular Michelin, not the X Light. So I was wondering if anyone had tried both. I also see that Michelin makes a tubetype tire for the older rims. I'm assuming they are the same other than the bead area.
Sadly, the tube type tire has been discontinued.
I've never tried the Extra Light Michelin. The regular one just seems to work so perfectly that I'm hesitant to change. I've heard some riders say that they didn't think the traction was quite as good with the light tire. I'm guessing that it favors the hoppers (which I am not).
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:28 PM   #22
jonnyc21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordo83 View Post
I was thinking jonnyc21 was talking about the regular Michelin, not the X Light. So I was wondering if anyone had tried both. I also see that Michelin makes a tubetype tire for the older rims. I'm assuming they are the same other than the bead area.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamotovita View Post
Sadly, the tube type tire has been discontinued.
I've never tried the Extra Light Michelin. The regular one just seems to work so perfectly that I'm hesitant to change. I've heard some riders say that they didn't think the traction was quite as good with the light tire. I'm guessing that it favors the hoppers (which I am not).
Yes I am talking the regular Michelin, not the X Light. I have not experianced the x-light, but have a friend that has and did indicated it dosn't have as much traction in his mind unless he hops...
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:20 PM   #23
Gordo83
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I found a place that claims they have the tube type. If they do, would you think it would be a tire that has been hanging around a while? Any problems running a tube in a tubeless Michelin, in the event that they don't have the tube type?
Thanks folks.
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:13 PM   #24
lamotovita
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordo83 View Post
I found a place that claims they have the tube type. If they do, would you think it would be a tire that has been hanging around a while? Any problems running a tube in a tubeless Michelin, in the event that they don't have the tube type?
Thanks folks.
The tube isn't likely to cause you any problems. Some people have reported problems keeping a Tubeless tire seated on a tube type rim at low pressures.
The tube type tire has been discontinued for a year or two. If you can tell me of a source for them I'd appreciate it. I really like that tire on my dual sport/trail bikes. The tubeless tire will give better traction than the tube type tire, as well as wear faster and squirm on the road.
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Old 03-08-2013, 03:16 PM   #25
Gordo83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamotovita View Post
The tube isn't likely to cause you any problems. Some people have reported problems keeping a Tubeless tire seated on a tube type rim at low pressures.
The tube type tire has been discontinued for a year or two. If you can tell me of a source for them I'd appreciate it. I really like that tire on my dual sport/trail bikes. The tubeless tire will give better traction than the tube type tire, as well as wear faster and squirm on the road.
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Old 03-09-2013, 07:58 AM   #26
clfarren5944 OP
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rear tire

OK, I got my new rim strip from Tryals Shop. I've never installed one before so are there any tricks, special techniques to a successful outcome? As I've said before, only want to do it once. The original valve stem core leaks but won't come out.
Chris
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Old 03-11-2013, 12:14 PM   #27
Sting32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clfarren5944 View Post
OK, I got my new rim strip from Tryals Shop. I've never installed one before so are there any tricks, special techniques to a successful outcome? As I've said before, only want to do it once. The original valve stem core leaks but won't come out.
Chris
Valve core is your problem then.

Rubber is only a problem usually if the rim starts to "rust" under it. The rubber can be glued into place, if you only glue on 2 of the 4 sides of the rubber, carefully. By carefully I mean you can cause yourself more grief with silicone if you don't think it through when applying even just tire sealer, it gets into the nipple and thread on your spokes you will be frustrated when you change a spoke in the future. Don't ask me why I know this fact, lol.

I wish I had a picture of the cutaway rim with rubber in the groove, but think of the rubber as a V shaped thing, with bottom point cut off to look more like \_/

So you only want to put some sealer on the 2 sides of the V, and I always dribbled a tiny amount of WD-40 or some oil on the spoke nipples, so they would/might be easier to get loose if I break a spoke, which I have done.

so you apply a little sealer here --> \_/ <-- There only. this again is really only needed when the channel it is stuck in doesn't seem smooth and fails to make a seal against the rubber itself. I have had as much trouble with NEW rubber as I had with the one I took out of the rim. Rule of thumb is to NEVER touch that rubber while DOING ANYTHING on the back tire, if it wasnt leaking before, lol. if you hit it with your screwdrivers (tire tools) while changing tires, you will hate yourself.

Many guys just put in a TUBE, and ride for years that way, I even did that. Only reason I hated the tube was, if you poke your tire, you are going to pull the tube and patch it, where with my TUBLESS tire, I can patch a poke-hole with those tubless tire repair "tiger-shit ropes" and glue without removing the tire.

I have used an automotive type valve core in the tubeless tire, but that brings on other complications at the hole in the band. you probably need to order the valve stem...
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:09 PM   #28
laser17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clfarren5944 View Post
OK, I got my new rim strip from Tryals Shop. I've never installed one before so are there any tricks, special techniques to a successful outcome? As I've said before, only want to do it once. The original valve stem core leaks but won't come out.
Chris
http://www.lewisportusa.com/manuals/...ent_manual.pdf

The newer integrated valve stem/rim strips are the way to go IMO.
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:49 AM   #29
Sting32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laser17 View Post
http://www.lewisportusa.com/manuals/...ent_manual.pdf

The newer integrated valve stem/rim strips are the way to go IMO.
See, your great laser. I had to go from memory...

I still have an old band hangin from rafters somewhere, I think. and I know they didn't have the valve stems built in when I made that investment, lool... I think the strip was like 45 bucks even back in 04?
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:04 AM   #30
Twin-shocker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clfarren5944 View Post
How does a Dunlop D803 radial compare with Michelin radial. The Dunlop is new, 2005 vintage. On a Scorpa 4 stroke. The original Michelin is cracking and tends to leak.
Thanks, Chris
The only place for a 2005 tyre is the bin if you are riding serious competition, as the rubber will have gone very hard. Fine for play bike riding, but for competition look at Michelin, unless you are riding mainly rocks, where the very stiff sidewalls of the Dunlops seem to work well.
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