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Old 03-04-2013, 02:01 PM   #16
das ist gut
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Through years of experience, I have found that while Craftsman does guarantee a lot of their tools, those smaller items will wear out quickly AND they replace them with the same type item, that also wears quickly or breaks.

AND through years of experience, I have developed a rule when it comes to my personal tools:
Rather than buying "the best you can afford", I now prescribe to this idea - instead of buying the best you can afford, stick your money back in your pocket and go work a bit more overtime, or go make a couple more sales, or go come up with another solution to reducing costs.

And then take that extra money you made the last few weeks and go out and buy that next step up in quality of tool you were previously considering.

A good tool will last for a good while, like a lot of the Craftsman line.

BUT A GREAT TOOL will last a lifetime or two!
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Old 03-04-2013, 02:07 PM   #17
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Used tools can be great bargains . . . there was a time when Craftsman made outstanding tools, and at affordable prices . . . . . if you find a cache of 30 year old Craftsman on eBay or Craigslist for a good price, grab em . . . . . .
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Old 03-04-2013, 04:56 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
Back on bits. When I worked as an industrial mech. I used lots of hex bits and when it fit I used an Apex bit holder with SAE bits as the machinery was mostly SAE. They are hard steel and unlikely to break. Other bits like shown with insertion & made from 2 pieces are sort of expendable tools so a lifetime warranty is nice but if like said your making a living with them failure is not cool. Hex bits are not nearly so "fiesty" as Torx bits which easily fail esp in the smaller sizes like 15T. I've seen much better service from name brands in Torx bits but see no hard reason to go for them if a casual wrencher.
At the time(1960's) I was an apprentice, the tools given to us were Williams and good stuff/USA made then. FWIW, my 1 st set of Globemaster metric 3/8ths sockets are still alive & well-made in Japan which was considered crap at time I bought them.
Apex tools are used extensively in production. There are two grades. The first is meant for use with impact tools. The second is much harder and meant for use with power nut runners. They are more brittle than the impact ones but last much longer. I have a set of Apex hex bits and they are better than any others I've used.
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Old 03-04-2013, 05:44 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by jtatknox View Post
What's the difference between these two bit sets other than country of origin and $58.47? I want to make good investments in quality tools, but I also want to make SMART investments. I'd love to hear peoples thoughts on this. Both are lifetime guaranteed.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

http://www.toolsdelivered.com/Willia...it-Socket-Sets

Only you can answer if you want excellent quality, or just good enough. I have wrenches that are excellent quality, and I have good enough. The good enoughs I have several of every size.

The brands for excellent dont have to be well known, I bought some Husky from home depot that have been pretty darn good. I'm still using tools my Dad gave me (auto and heavy equip mechanic) that he bought in the early 30's thru the 50's. 9/32 drive snap on sockets, ratchets and break overs (9/32 is pretty rare, was dropped in the 40's), Plombs (not plumb) and Vlchek wrenches. Bunch of Proto, Williams, Craftsman and others.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:08 PM   #20
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Cornwell tools are very good. They make tools for industrial use and aren't real common in the retail market. They turn up used every so often.

If there's a used tool store nearby, it can be a real gem. I've bought a lot of serviceable used quality tools, and the prices can be very attractive. I don't mind pawing around in boxes of sockets for the one I need, especially a big one for that once in a lifetime job.

Don't buy 12 point sockets unless you need one for a 12 point headed bolt. They wear out too quickly and are weaker.
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:19 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
Apex tools are used extensively in production. There are two grades. The first is meant for use with impact tools. The second is much harder and meant for use with power nut runners. They are more brittle than the impact ones but last much longer. I have a set of Apex hex bits and they are better than any others I've used.
Mine Apex hex bits from the 1960's are still like new-Torx bits are another story as they wear out constantly & usually give in to that one tough situation. e.g. , I was pulling the front fender on a late model Audi & went through 3 on one small fastener!
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:29 PM   #22
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I realized years ago that the Mac box full of Snap-On tools could put two other motorbikes in my garage. No question to that equation.

I replaced most of everything with Craftsman and have never looked back. Anything that sees a ton of use, or starts wearing in a way I am not happy with gets switched out with something of much higher quality.

Kept all the original air tools because their quality is more than twice that of those half their price.

The things I never skimp out on though is screwdrivers and allen head wrenches. The line between great and garbage with these is very thin.
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:59 PM   #23
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In general "Made in America" is what I look for when it comes to hand tools. If you can afford them, they are better quality.

I wish I could buy Snap on or Mac someplace retail. The trucks are hard to deal with if you aren't in the industry.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:09 PM   #24
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Most of the "Masterforce" tools at Menard's (including wrenches, sockets, and bits) are made in the US. They're very high quality and reasonably priced (the 3 to 8mm hex bit set is only $27). They're not very pretty in some cases, but I much prefer an honest bead-blasted finish rather than thick layers of shiny chrome.

Make sure you pay attention, though -- Masterforce pliers, for example, are made in China. Not bad, honestly, but the Channellock pliers nearby are a far better choice for something you're going to use more than once.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:44 AM   #25
ttpete
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott_PDX View Post
In general "Made in America" is what I look for when it comes to hand tools. If you can afford them, they are better quality.

I wish I could buy Snap on or Mac someplace retail. The trucks are hard to deal with if you aren't in the industry.
Both are available online. I've bought Snap-On that way.
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:14 PM   #26
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This is another option.
http://www.amazon.com/Neiko-10075A-P...ref=pd_cp_hi_1

I have a set from this company, and have had no problems with it. I've even run a few of them in an impact gun, for removing, not tightening.

I'd buy SnapOn if I was made of money, but I have to be more careful than that.

Somebody mentioned Kobalt from Lowe's. I have yet to get a straight answer from anybody at Lowes (I've tried different stores) stating exactly what it takes to return a tool. Some say I need a receipt, others have told me I need to mail them to Kobalt and others say I just need to bring it back. Until the warranty is as easy as Sears, I won't bother buying them. I'm really happy that I bought a lot of hand tools earlier in life, before Sears turned to crap.
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Old 03-08-2013, 06:27 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by OaklandStrom View Post
This is another option.
http://www.amazon.com/Neiko-10075A-P...ref=pd_cp_hi_1

I have a set from this company, and have had no problems with it. I've even run a few of them in an impact gun, for removing, not tightening.

I'd buy SnapOn if I was made of money, but I have to be more careful than that.

Somebody mentioned Kobalt from Lowe's. I have yet to get a straight answer from anybody at Lowes (I've tried different stores) stating exactly what it takes to return a tool. Some say I need a receipt, others have told me I need to mail them to Kobalt and others say I just need to bring it back. Until the warranty is as easy as Sears, I won't bother buying them. I'm really happy that I bought a lot of hand tools earlier in life, before Sears turned to crap.
I bought a used set on ebay & one was broken-took it to the store & walked away with a new tool. Whole set in fact!
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