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Old 03-08-2013, 01:30 AM   #136
snofrog
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Originally Posted by HOT DAMN! View Post


You need to get out more man.
sorry , we dont have many of them that are free range . most are coop around here
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:21 AM   #137
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Originally Posted by LoJack View Post
I like trailers for hauling crap, but I don't think I'd ever carry a kid in one. You are too long and some people just don't expect anything to be tied to a bike back there.
I don't underdstand your argument.

If someone comes up from behind, it's clear there's a trailer being towed by a cyclist. If someone is coming from the front, what does it matter? If someone comes up from the side, they can clearly see what it is and the length.

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Originally Posted by LoJack View Post
If'n'when I have a kid, it's pretty much going to be a kiddie seat strapped to the bike frame, whether it's the kind that straddles the top tube or either a long tail or bakfiet style.
The problem with child seats is that he/she is not protected. If/when you crash, or the bike falls over (I've seen this a couple times), the child will be slammed to the ground. If you think about a tree falling, the top of the tree hits the ground with a lot more velocity than the trunk. Closer to the ground means less impact to the child. Strapping a helmet on them isn't going to do crap. Their body and face are still exposed. Plus, that slamming to the ground will still cause a brain impact on a young, undeveloped organ. Want to cause a permanent injury to one's brain? Do it when they're young.

The Chariot Cougar has an integral rollcage. The child is strapped in, with a 4-point harness. It features adjustable suspension, storage, weather protection from all elements, smooth ride for the towbike and passenger (other than the weight, I don't feel the trailer hitting bumps), lightweight, hitch safety system, and extremely high quality construction. It would take something really drastic, to get this trailer on its top, during an accident. This trailer can't fall over. In short, I don't see how a child seat can compare to this trailer, for a young one's safety and well-being.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:35 AM   #138
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Okay, that video is pretty hard to swallow. I only made it through about two minutes before involuntary eye-rolling prevented me from watching any more of it.


However, I found this thread because I'm interested in adding a luggage rack and a set of decent panniers to my hard-tail mountain bike.

It's nothing fancy. A Gary Fisher "Piranha".

Any suggestions? I am kinda partial to Timbuk2, but I certainly have an open mind.

Will panniers work with any rack or do you need a specific rack for specific panniers?

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Old 03-08-2013, 07:58 AM   #139
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Okay, that video is pretty hard to swallow. I only made it through about two minutes before involuntary eye-rolling prevented me from watching any more of it.


However, I found this thread because I'm interested in adding a luggage rack and a set of decent panniers to my hard-tail mountain bike.

It's nothing fancy. A Gary Fisher "Piranha".

Any suggestions? I am kinda partial to Timbuk2, but I certainly have an open mind.

Will panniers work with any rack or do you need a specific rack for specific panniers?

You don't say what exactly you're going to be doing with this setup (GDMBR, cross-country tour, commuting). That'll determine what you should be looking at. Just a few thoughts, though. Ortlieb is known to be the best bag out there. Absolutely, waterproof! Steel racks can be easily repaired, by anybody. Whatever rack you choose, you want something that'll hang the panniers low, to keep the CoG low. Some racks have a two-tier mounting system that'll allow you run the panniers high (for offroad) and low.

Have you considered frame, seat, and handlebar bags? This guy has had pretty good success, with them. An article here, too.

A good article, here.

Take a look, around here.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:11 AM   #140
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Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
You don't say what exactly you're going to be doing with this setup (GDMBR, cross-country tour, commuting). That'll determine what you should be looking at. Just a few thoughts, though. Ortlieb is known to be the best bag out there. Absolutely, waterproof! Steel racks can be easily repaired, by anybody. Whatever rack you choose, you want something that'll hang the panniers low, to keep the CoG low. Some racks have a two-tier mounting system that'll allow you run the panniers high (for offroad) and low.

Have you considered frame, seat, and handlebar bags? This guy has had pretty good success, with them. An article here, too.

A good article, here.

Take a look, around here.

Ah!

Very good point. Yeah. That info would be kinda relevant, huh.

I'm just looking for something for mostly commuting. Possibly riding back and forth to work or a quick trip to the grocery store or something. Not looking at a lengthy trip or anything. Shmaaaayyybeee, a picnic or something for a little longer joyride, but I'm really looking for a starting point.


Seriously, thanks for the links!!!

I don't know why I didn't think about Ortleib.


Ooooh... I like these.



http://www.thetouringstore.com/ORTLI...SPP%20PAGE.htm
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Xeraux screwed with this post 03-08-2013 at 08:35 AM
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:18 AM   #141
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Okay, that video is pretty hard to swallow. I only made it through about two minutes before involuntary eye-rolling prevented me from watching any more of it.


However, I found this thread because I'm interested in adding a luggage rack and a set of decent panniers to my hard-tail mountain bike.

It's nothing fancy. A Gary Fisher "Piranha".

Any suggestions? I am kinda partial to Timbuk2, but I certainly have an open mind.

Will panniers work with any rack or do you need a specific rack for specific panniers?

you'll want to know your chainstay length, crank length and shoe length to determine if you have heel clearance issues on your upstroke. Tubus makes adapters to move the rack rearward of the rear axle. You ought to be able to approximate where the front of the pannier will sit as roughly half to 1/3rds the length of the rack, depending on the rack's geometry, and a bit on the tilt you put on it when you install it.

edit: I meant 1/3rd.

DriveShaft screwed with this post 03-08-2013 at 11:17 AM
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:21 AM   #142
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Okay, that video is pretty hard to swallow. I only made it through about two minutes before involuntary eye-rolling prevented me from watching any more of it.


However, I found this thread because I'm interested in adding a luggage rack and a set of decent panniers to my hard-tail mountain bike.

It's nothing fancy. A Gary Fisher "Piranha".

Any suggestions? I am kinda partial to Timbuk2, but I certainly have an open mind.

Will panniers work with any rack or do you need a specific rack for specific panniers?

Dammit Xereaux if you don't buy the whole "I'm superior to the rest of the world motif" of the woman and her cargo bike, why even bother?
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:50 AM   #143
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Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
you'll want to know your chainstay length, crank length and shoe length to determine if you have heel clearance issues on your upstroke. Tubus makes adapters to move the rack rearward of the rear axle. You ought to be able to approximate where the front of the pannier will sit as roughly half to 2/3rds the length of the rack, depending on the rack's geometry, and a bit on the tilt you put on it when you install it.




Holy shit. I didn't realise that it was this complicated. I can see what you're talking about, though. You certainly wouldn't want to be hitting things with your heel or something when you're trying to pedal.

I gotta take some measurements this weekend.

Here's my bike.

http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...e#.UToydjfGfIc
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:51 AM   #144
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Originally Posted by Jurgen View Post
Dammit Xereaux if you don't buy the whole "I'm superior to the rest of the world motif" of the woman and her cargo bike, why even bother?
I can't.

I have a smug allergy.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:14 AM   #145
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post


Holy shit. I didn't realise that it was this complicated. I can see what you're talking about, though. You certainly wouldn't want to be hitting things with your heel or something when you're trying to pedal.

I gotta take some measurements this weekend.

Here's my bike.

http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...e#.UToydjfGfIc
Yeah, I discovered this great divide between "performance-headed" cyclists, vs. "touring" cyclists through this little exploration. Before: Braze-ons? Is that where you mount your bottle of accelerade, or your tiny useless carbon fiber pump? Now: I'm looking at race bikes thinking "not enough eyelets." Of course...I'm completely ignoring the BMXers, and I'm sure about 10 other clans. But whatever.

Here's what the extension looks like....buys you a few inches. Just eyeballing that wiki pic of your bike, I'm thinking you're going to benefit from something along those lines. Gary Fisher was deep into downhill at that time, and doing everything they could to move the rider's center-of-mass rearward, including a real compact stubby chainstay & 26" wheels, which'll put your heel real close to the rear axle.



I think you're also missing the cross-tube where you would otherwise be able to attach the top of the rack. Coated "P-clamps" mounted on the seat stays give you a place to tie your racks onto up there. Jandd's got a set like this:


DriveShaft screwed with this post 03-08-2013 at 11:21 AM
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Old 03-08-2013, 12:29 PM   #146
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Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
Yeah, I discovered this great divide between "performance-headed" cyclists, vs. "touring" cyclists through this little exploration. Before: Braze-ons? Is that where you mount your bottle of accelerade, or your tiny useless carbon fiber pump? Now: I'm looking at race bikes thinking "not enough eyelets." Of course...I'm completely ignoring the BMXers, and I'm sure about 10 other clans. But whatever.

Here's what the extension looks like....buys you a few inches. Just eyeballing that wiki pic of your bike, I'm thinking you're going to benefit from something along those lines. Gary Fisher was deep into downhill at that time, and doing everything they could to move the rider's center-of-mass rearward, including a real compact stubby chainstay & 26" wheels, which'll put your heel real close to the rear axle.



I think you're also missing the cross-tube where you would otherwise be able to attach the top of the rack. Coated "P-clamps" mounted on the seat stays give you a place to tie your racks onto up there. Jandd's got a set like this:

Man, I really appreciate all the information. I think I'm probably going to end up with one of those Ortleib sets. Bomb-proof and, in my opinion, reasonably priced.

Now, I just have to get that rack sorted.

Yeah. I think you may be right about the cross tube. I may actually have some of those p-clamps in my box with all the bits and bobs I've accumulated for my GS. I'm almost positive I bought some for something a while back.
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:34 PM   #147
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Man, I really appreciate all the information. I think I'm probably going to end up with one of those Ortleib sets. Bomb-proof and, in my opinion, reasonably priced.

Now, I just have to get that rack sorted.

Yeah. I think you may be right about the cross tube. I may actually have some of those p-clamps in my box with all the bits and bobs I've accumulated for my GS. I'm almost positive I bought some for something a while back.
Np. I've gone through this for my SO's bike recently, so this is pretty-much top of mind for me.

Last bit of recall: You'll probably have a sizable distance to get from the end of the rack to your seat stay. Racks have extension arms that reach down to the seat stay, and bolt into--well, in your case, the P-clamps. Since the mtb always features that massively sloping top tube for nut clearance, the distance between the top of the seat stay and your rack will be huge. When you spec out your rack, it doesn't matter what length extension bars came with the rack. You will need the LONG (e.g.: 16") extension bars. Again, I had good success swapping in a Jandd bar. Beefy, rugged steel bars, which my LBS stocks.
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:57 PM   #148
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Originally Posted by Xeraux View Post
Now, I just have to get that rack sorted.
I am going to second what someone else said.
GO STEEL!!!!
Aluminum racks are nice and light but hard to fix if the break and the bags "can" rub through them if you ride on a lot of rough surfaces. Old Man mountain make some nice Al ones though....

Here are my favorites:
Surly nice racks - they are heavy, but VERY functional.
Tubus
Old Man Mountain

If you do not have big feet (mine are 12's), setting up a rear rack is much easier......

Have fun!
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Old 03-09-2013, 06:29 AM   #149
ducnut
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Here are my favorites:
Surly nice racks - they are heavy, but VERY functional.
Tubus
Old Man Mountain
Yeah, the Surly racks are really nice. I, especially like that the attachment extensions are tubular, instead of flat strap. Also, their front is a low-rider design, yet, has a platform. You can't have enough places to strap crap.

This Dajia model is SS and affordable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveShaft View Post
I think you're also missing the cross-tube where you would otherwise be able to attach the top of the rack. Coated "P-clamps" mounted on the seat stays give you a place to tie your racks onto up there. Jandd's got a set like this:

Actually, I believe the Pirhana to have upper eyelets. But, if not, I prefer this integrated seatpost clamp. P-clamps will work, but, aren't as solid. Salsa, also, offer a collar that just mounts to the seatpost, as opposed to this all-in-one solution.




I setup my GF's 2000 Giant Yukon with a Trek Interchange rack and bag (already had them). Then, hung Banjo Brothers grocery panniers, on the sides. Seems to work well, with no clearance issues.
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Old 03-09-2013, 07:58 AM   #150
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Actually, I believe the Pirhana to have upper eyelets.
They do!



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