ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts > The British Invasion: Triumph Tigers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-19-2013, 08:30 PM   #16321
kingofZroad
Gnarly Adventurer
 
kingofZroad's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Montrose, CO
Oddometer: 342
I wish the rear brake was more aggressive...
kingofZroad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 04:09 AM   #16322
blacktiger
Tigers R great.
 
blacktiger's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: St.Leonards on Sea, England.
Oddometer: 3,690
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
If they're replacing the valve cover and plug hole O-rings with a valve check, find a new dealer, as those are reusable.
They should be but according to the Triumph manual they're replaced on a service. I certainly won't be replacing them every time when I start doing it myself.
__________________
2002 black Tiger955i, 72000 miles and counting.
2012 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 40000 miles and counting.
2013 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 500 miles and counting.
blacktiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 04:10 AM   #16323
blacktiger
Tigers R great.
 
blacktiger's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: St.Leonards on Sea, England.
Oddometer: 3,690
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
It's all about the RPM. Hydraulic valvetrains simply can't be spun up. The bikes you note are cruisers, which won't even see the RPM where the triple starts coming on.
Not true. The Honda CBX750 in the mid '80s had Hydraulic tappets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_CBX750

http://teamrc17.net/articles/104/a-r...rbike-magazine
Look under "Power train".
__________________
2002 black Tiger955i, 72000 miles and counting.
2012 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 40000 miles and counting.
2013 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 500 miles and counting.

blacktiger screwed with this post 03-20-2013 at 04:21 AM
blacktiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 04:15 AM   #16324
blacktiger
Tigers R great.
 
blacktiger's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: St.Leonards on Sea, England.
Oddometer: 3,690
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
I think you and I are probably similar, in riding styles and experience. I use Ferodo, on everything that I personally ride. Their Sinter Grip ST is a pad I think you should try. They can be a little noisy, but, they're very aggressive without the need for a lot of temperature. If that doesn't give you the lever feel you desire, you can easily swap a takeoff master cylinder from a more sporty Triumph. I'm not sure on all the piston diameters of each bike, but, that's where I'd be looking.
Thing is, IMO, you don't want an aggressive front brake on a bike that's likely to be ridden on dirt. I think they got it right for the XC at least. That slight "mushy" feel gives the brake, er, feel. e.g. I can drag the front going down loose hills using my "brain ABS".
__________________
2002 black Tiger955i, 72000 miles and counting.
2012 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 40000 miles and counting.
2013 black Tiger800XC, The other British Land Rover. 500 miles and counting.
blacktiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 06:41 AM   #16325
ducatirdr
Re-entry Noob
 
ducatirdr's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Sutton MA
Oddometer: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger View Post
Thing is, IMO, you don't want an aggressive front brake on a bike that's likely to be ridden on dirt. I think they got it right for the XC at least. That slight "mushy" feel gives the brake, er, feel. e.g. I can drag the front going down loose hills using my "brain ABS".
I have a KTM woods bike and it has excellent brakes with strong initial bite. The brakes feel like overkill on that machine. I adjust to them quickly and appreciate their strong, save my arse, initial bite stopping power. I wish my Triumph had that same inital bite. I'd rather have to back off, then feel like I need to squeeze the juice out of them. They have a feeling of being undersize for the machine to me. I'm sure there is a reason for this like you mention but I wish they had a bit stronger feel to them.
__________________
04 Buell XB12R - Feels fast but isn't = Good street sport bike
12 KTM 350EXC-F - Enduro machine with plate so I can ride to the trails near my house
13 Triumph Tiger 800XC - Sold after clutch stranded me at 4K miles in Berkshires
2000 Ducati 996S - Madness
2014 H-D Breakout - Nothing like a big scooter to relax a bit
ducatirdr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 06:50 AM   #16326
KildareMan
Studly Adventurer
 
KildareMan's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: County Kildare, Ireland
Oddometer: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducatirdr View Post
I have a KTM woods bike and it has excellent brakes with strong initial bite. The brakes feel like overkill on that machine. I adjust to them quickly and appreciate their strong, save my arse, initial bite stopping power. I wish my Triumph had that same inital bite. I'd rather have to back off, then feel like I need to squeeze the juice out of them. They have a feeling of being undersize for the machine to me. I'm sure there is a reason for this like you mention but I wish they had a bit stronger feel to them.
Try EBC HH pads.
KildareMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 07:24 AM   #16327
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger View Post
Not true. The Honda CBX750 in the mid '80s had Hydraulic tappets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_CBX750

http://teamrc17.net/articles/104/a-r...rbike-magazine
Look under "Power train".
What was the redline of that engine? I'm guessing the Honda was at the absolute limit.

As mentioned, I'm not exactly sure of the layout and design of that vavletrain. I know it has rockers, which may contribute to Honda being able to run hydraulic lifters. The triple is shim-under-bucket. I'm not sure if there's ever been a bike with a hydraulic valvetrain and having the cams directly acting on the valves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger View Post
Thing is, IMO, you don't want an aggressive front brake on a bike that's likely to be ridden on dirt. I think they got it right for the XC at least. That slight "mushy" feel gives the brake, er, feel. e.g. I can drag the front going down loose hills using my "brain ABS".
See this post and "intended purpose". Different strokes for different folks.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 07:54 AM   #16328
KildareMan
Studly Adventurer
 
KildareMan's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: County Kildare, Ireland
Oddometer: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger View Post
Not true. The Honda CBX750 in the mid '80s had Hydraulic tappets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_CBX750
The Red one on the right was mine. Believe me when I say that engine was a peach and no slouch. Nearly as good as the Tiger. Wonder what happened to it?
KildareMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:20 AM   #16329
bross
Where we riding to?
 
bross's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Osoyoos, BC
Oddometer: 4,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
What was the redline of that engine? I'm guessing the Honda was at the absolute limit.

As mentioned, I'm not exactly sure of the layout and design of that vavletrain. I know it has rockers, which may contribute to Honda being able to run hydraulic lifters. The triple is shim-under-bucket. I'm not sure if there's ever been a bike with a hydraulic valvetrain and having the cams directly acting on the valves.
Who cares what the redline was/is? You mentioned the bikes I was talking about we're cruisers, and yes my Meanstreak was a cruiser, but I also mentioned Buell which are a long way from a cruiser. Great handling bikes with nearly 100hp (at the crank). Perfect for the road. The only people who really complained about Buells were riders coming off high strung 600 super sports who thought you had to be spinning 5 digits on the tach just to get moving.

In all honesty, how much of your riding time do you spend at 3/4 - wfo? I admit I love the sound of the Triumph triple when wound up, especially my wife's Street Triple even better than my Tiger, but seriously, that's probably less than 5% of my riding.

I know a lot of riders need that high rpm HIT of acceleration, I've owned KTM 2 strokes so know what that rush is like, but I also like a linear (read boring) rush of constant acceleration, which can be deceptively fast.

Honda had the chance with the new NC700, but chose not to. Oh well, going for my first ride on Friday in months, woo hoo!
bross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:28 AM   #16330
bluesman
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Hoegaarden, Belgium
Oddometer: 3,302
I tend to disagree about Buells. Worst part of them was that tractor motor.
Good torquey, hard pulling engine does not have to be like that - running out of breath before you finished blinking. I was very happy with my Honda VTR engine. After that Buell I tried felt like it's motor place is in field at nearby farm. Like chassis was totally let down by motor. Very narrow rpm range does not make good engine for asphalt-going bike enthusiastic riding. Specially when you ride somewhere like mountain passes in Switzerland.
bluesman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:37 AM   #16331
Yossarian™
Deputy Cultural Attaché
 
Yossarian™'s Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: the 'Ha
Oddometer: 9,638
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman View Post
I tend to disagree about Buells. Worst part of them was that tractor motor.
Good torquey, hard pulling engine does not have to be like that - running out of breath before you finished blinking.
Agreed wholeheartedly. The 1125 was different, of course, but the other Buell models, based on the H-D v-twins -- in a nutshell, WTF!? Just as it's getting a head of steam going, it runs out of RPMs.
__________________
Successfully surviving motorcycling since 1976.
Yossarian™ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:45 AM   #16332
KACinPA
n00b
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Oddometer: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian™ View Post
Agreed wholeheartedly. The 1125 was different, of course, but the other Buell models, based on the H-D v-twins -- in a nutshell, WTF!? Just as it's getting a head of steam going, it runs out of RPMs.

Sadly, that was a constraint placed on Eric Buell by H-D. Anything he built had to use H-D based V-Twin engine. Even the 500cc Blast was half of a H-D v-twin.

I believe he initially wanted to use a Rotax parallel twin, a la the BMW "F" engine in several bikes but was told no by H-D just before they kicked him to the curb.
KACinPA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 09:59 AM   #16333
Vzuke
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Vzuke's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Oddometer: 145
Battery retention?

This is a little embarrassing. I decided to mount my universal Acerbis mud/debris flap (this one keeps the crap off the rear shock). When I pulled the battery out I was surprised to see all those connectors/doodads in the bottom of battery box. I also noticed the “hooks” for the battery retention. Uh oh.

When I picked up the bike back in the Spring of 2011 the rubber strap was just laying in the storage area with the tool bag. I thought it was for the tool bag or the U-lock. I cut out all the U-lock features, to include that rubber bumper on the back of the passenger seat, and filled up the space with tire repair stuff and a little compressor. So I didn’t need that strap.




I never really thought about it. On my wife’s bike the seat is the battery retention device!

Well it’s were it should be now. I was having a devil of a time trying to hook the back side. So I cheated a little. I just used two tie wraps on the front end. It was time for dinner!



While I was cleaning up the bottom of the box I removed what I guess is a sensor (Its the one with the purple tube on it). Is that to let you know that your battery box is full of water?



Need to rethink the mud flap mounting idea. Maybe a L bracket to the bottom of the battery box, then mount the flap to that.

Another day.
Vzuke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 10:03 AM   #16334
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by bross View Post
Who cares what the redline was/is? You mentioned the bikes I was talking about we're cruisers, and yes my Meanstreak was a cruiser, but I also mentioned Buell which are a long way from a cruiser. Great handling bikes with nearly 100hp (at the crank). Perfect for the road. The only people who really complained about Buells were riders coming off high strung 600 super sports who thought you had to be spinning 5 digits on the tach just to get moving.
The Buell engine you mention had a cruiser-based engine that was very RPM limited (5000-5500RPM?). The knife/fork connecting rod setup will not take much RPM. They had to be cammed in such a way that they only made power, just before the rev-limiter. Because they have to be spun-up and get ridden like a sportbike, they don't stay together. There's a huge Buell club, about an hour north of me. They've blown so many engines it's crazy; one guy had blown three in 2yrs. Bob Taft (multi-time, H-D world record holder) is about 45min north of me. Even he will tell you the engines aren't worth a crap for use in a Buell.

I can't stand 600cc, I-4 sportbikes, for just the reason you stated. Yet, I complained about Buell's use of a Sportster engine. Why? Because after riding my 900SS, the Buell engine felt like a joke. Even the XB series was a letdown, in the engine department.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bross View Post
Honda had the chance with the new NC700, but chose not to.
You're contradicting yourself. They built a solid, tractable motor that's efficient at street RPM. What more could you want?

BTW, Just busting your balls a bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman View Post
I tend to disagree about Buells. Worst part of them was that tractor motor.
Good torquey, hard pulling engine does not have to be like that - running out of breath before you finished blinking. I was very happy with my Honda VTR engine. After that Buell I tried felt like it's motor place is in field at nearby farm. Like chassis was totally let down by motor. Very narrow rpm range does not make good engine for asphalt-going bike enthusiastic riding. Specially when you ride somewhere like mountain passes in Switzerland.
Agreed.

The VTR was a brilliant bike; sorta' like a reliable, Japanese Ducati.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 10:06 AM   #16335
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vzuke View Post
That poor strap will disintegrate in a year, anyway.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014