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Old 03-21-2013, 09:42 AM   #16
Steve In Ireland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Alexander View Post
Thanks Steve!

The pic of the rear seat bottom, is that a whole glassed in base the seat is sitting on? Any idea what's inside it ... would it be possible to add a filler from the outside and use it as a gas tank? If I made my subfloor that same height with the tank under and then full storage at that same level along the length of the car would there be enough room to slide my feel under the front cowling?

This is difficult without actually having a car to look at.

If worst came to worst could I fit The Boss in the front and carry two sets of golf clubs in the back
What you can see in the back is the base of the original rear bench seat. I have made a separate rear seat that sits on top of this (more comfort). The base is glassed in, but is not that deep. You could conceivably fit a tank in there, but you would have to cut the base out to get access. Also the body bolts to the chassis through holes underneath that seat so you need access beneath the seat base, which would probably prevent you from putting a tank in there. Finally, the rear end of the sidecar sits a long way back towards the rear of the bike and is hard to support from the bike so not sure you would be wanting to put a heavy tank in there. I have seen people who have cut an access panel in the rear seat base to allow the space underneath to be used for storage.
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:50 PM   #17
bmwhacker
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Cool "Mega" sidecars. Saw a pair up close at a Rally a couple years ago. My Wife would love one after riding in the Jupiter chair which is miniscule in comparison.




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Old 03-22-2013, 10:49 PM   #18
XL-erate
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May I ask what are the approximate dimensions on those bodies, as the car body itself outside measure? Also dimensions with sidecar wheel included?

Thanks !
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:08 AM   #19
Dan Alexander OP
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This is what I got from googling and hitting the right site, it's in post 6 with the dimensions of the other cars they make


Oxford:

Length 231cm 91"

Width 106cm 42"

Leg room 111cm front/86cm rear 44"/34"

Cockpit width 76cm 30"

Seat to roof 86cm front/79cm rear 34"/31"

Weight 130Kg 287#
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Old 03-23-2013, 07:34 PM   #20
XL-erate
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Alexander View Post
This is what I got from googling and hitting the right site, it's in post 6 with the dimensions of the other cars they make


Oxford:

Length 231cm 91"

Width 106cm 42"

Leg room 111cm front/86cm rear 44"/34"

Cockpit width 76cm 30"

Seat to roof 86cm front/79cm rear 34"/31"

Weight 130Kg 287#
THANKS very much, I appreciate it!

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Old 04-03-2013, 10:18 PM   #21
JBT
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Your idea of turning a Watsonian Oxford in a camper is such a good idea that I have the same!
This model seems to be the only adequate basis.
I previously had a Cambridge sidecar, attached to a kawa Z1100 ST. Same chassis, same dimensions, but only 2 seats and a huge trunk instead of the 2 back seats of the Oxford.
The dimensions are OK to be used to sleep into, for a normal well breed biker, or for two anorexic bikers in love...
You could also consider adding a textil roof for extra space when canopys are open, just as VW campers.

Caution to few points:
-the Oxford is very, very, very heavy. 130 kgs at least. Chose a bike that could cope with this extra weight. This weight is a good thing to prevent sidecar lift, but don't try off road: low (10 inches wheel, could be converted to 13' with another mudguard), loooong (specially in the tail) large and loud. Or try 2WD Ural.
-the millenary british traditionnal building of Watsonian sidecars involves wood parts into the fiberglass body. Water rottens theses pieces, resin osmoses, and the sidcar is literrally desquaming. It s a pain in the ass to prepare it for a new paint in these conditions!
-The chassis is not rigid at all. Imagine a single oval with a 10 inches whell on one side, and 4 long curvy multi positionnable fitments on the other side.
The sidecar body seats in the middle of that oval, on 2 simple beds.
On my ex Cambridge, I had added a fifth attach, from the seat/tank junction of my bike to the swinging arm axle of the side car, that was crossing the sidecar body just behind the front seat: il solved the rigidity matter radically. But that solution would not allow to clear space to sleep in the body, except il you're Houdini. So you could maybe cheat by bending that 5th attach to make room inside?
I'll buy an Oxford one of these days, but probably use only the body to adapt it on a Ural chassis, more rigid...
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Old 07-18-2013, 02:13 AM   #22
sidecarMick
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I have one of these!

To respond to a couple of points made on this thread:
The thing is enormous!!!!!!! and heavy. Although my XJ900S has no problem lugging it about fully loaded at illegal speeds!!
It isn't the easiest thing to climb in and out of in standard trim.
The plywood floor does rot out ( I put my hand through mine!!)
They're not for shy and retiring types, as every man and his dog wants to engage you in conversation.
The reason I bought it in the first place was because of my wife's limited mobility. This meant that she couldn't easily climb onto a pillion any more.
As regards climbing in and out, she really struggled getting out again (although the front bench seat was very comfortable for her), so I decided to cut it out and fit an old office swivel chair I had in my workshop. This involved cutting out the bonded in front seat and bolting the chair to a subframe and large sheet of plywood (to stop it falling through the rotten floor). This has worked very well and is super comfy and much more accessible.


I also added a step in front of the chair wheel to facilitate access, much better!
Before.

After.

Cheers, Mick.
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Old 07-18-2013, 07:40 AM   #23
claude
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Guess I am jumping in here again at a late date but though a couple of quick comments may be in order. One is that if modifying an older Watsonian (steel fender is the giveaway to 'older' I think..) The frame connections were brazed together at the casting members. This can be a surprise if not known and welding is taking place here or there. Another thing is that there were two large models made ...the Oxford and the Cambridge. I see the plywood issues have been discussed already. We ran a Watsonian Palma for a few years and it was a very enjoyable sidecar.
Possibly SidecarJohn can verify my definition of older/ steel fender statement. By the way if anyone has never checked out his website it is a very cool one.
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:39 AM   #24
sidecarMick
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Interesting Claude, I'll have a nosey and see if I can find any evidence of brazed joints. The fender on mine is fibreglass.

Cheers, Mick.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:53 PM   #25
claude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidecarMick View Post
Interesting Claude, I'll have a nosey and see if I can find any evidence of brazed joints. The fender on mine is fibreglass.

Cheers, Mick.
I think , or so have been told, that if the fender is not steel there isn't any brazed joints. I am talking about where the tubes go into the cast members. You can probably tell just by taking some of the finish off the joint area but I think it isn't a concern with the glass fender.
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