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Old 03-23-2013, 02:38 AM   #1696
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On the road after a good breakfast of oatmeal. The section of the route from Marrupa to Montepuez is currently under construction, meaning, get out and ride the world before it all gets paved over!


Road construction through forests and rainy seasons don't go together. Riding the detour from the newly laid roadbed on the right.


African Mud. It's good for the boots.


A wide puddle but it looked shallow, so I just went for it.


The construction petered out and I was smiling end to end as the road became a small forest trail. It was getting close to mid-day and these cumulonimbus clouds were heading for my path.


sanDRina in the forests of Northern Mozambique. There was hardly any traffic on this route, evident by the grassy, center berm. I loved being amongst such tall trees but it saddened me that they would be chopped down soon to make way for progress.


Having a lunch of soft-boiled eggs and buns. I made these eggs in the morning and like to boil them for 5 to 6 minutes to get the yolk into a semi-solid state.


Just as I was finishing up lunch in the middle of the forest, rain drops started falling. I packed up and got moving and rode through a fair amount of rain. The route was sandy but when it got wet, it actually became easier to ride.


Riding through rain is not a problem but I'm a bit wary of lightning and this one thunderstorm was throwing down the electrical shards ahead of me and I thought best to wait it out instead of riding through it. I pulled up in this little village and asked in my basic Portuguese if I could just take a break here. A few minutes after getting inside this hut, the storm hit and the rain came down heavy.


The villagers who let me stay in their hut during the storm.


The kids were thrilled to see this strange man and his strange motorcycle make a stop in their village.


I presumed this man was the village head and this boy, who was the best-dressed there, was his eldest son.


The kids were all shy of my camera at first, but once I took one picture and showed it to them, they all loved it and wanted to get in every shot. Here, they're eating some left over nshima and beans after an adult was through with his lunch.


Look into his eyes as he reaches for his next hand-full of nshima. This kid looked to be the smartest one and I thought about how geography (where you are born on this planet) plays such a critical role in determining who gets what kind of chance in this world.


Twenty minutes later and the thunderstorm had passed with sunshine in its wake.


Saying goodbye to the mamas of the village.


And one last shot of all the kids.
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Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:39 AM   #1697
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Back on the trail with the sun beating down and you can't even tell that it just rained so hard.


Oops. I was riding through this sandy riverbed and didn't see that wooden spike sticking out of the ground. It caught my tool tube and down we went. A few guys came running out of the woods and helped me lift sanDRina back up with the rubber side down.


Evidence of the recent rains. Where the puddles were huge, a side track was cut into the brush.


Riding lots of corrugations and I noticed a bolt for my pannier frame had rattled out.


I found a replacement M6 bolt from my bag-o-bolts, put a dab of Loctite thread-locker and off we go.


A long and messy mud puddle with an even messier detour. I went a bit back and made my own entry into the detour.


Camping in a cheap residencial in Montepuez, a large town on the other end of the forest track. The beds were creaky and the mattress didn't look inviting and there was no mosquito net, so best to setup my tent, which is a home I know.


At least sanDRina had a nice place to spend the night in Montepuez. The next day's ride was short and easy, heading down to the coast.


A big baobab tree just across Russel's Place in Pemba with the clear waters of the Indian Ocean.


Russel's is a backpackers and is the cheapest place to stay near the ocean. I took a bed in this elevated hut for 500 Meticais ($16.85). I was slowly adjusting to the higher prices in Mozambique compared to neighboring East Africa.


I met another biker who was also staying at the same place and we both headed out for some fresh seafood. We bought this squid, which was caught just a few hours ago, for 250 Meticais ($8.43) and...


...this lady here cut and grilled it up for us for another 30 Meticais ($1). She also had a supply of beers and chapatis to go with it. The breeze was blowing strong and the atmosphere was fantastic.


The receding tide at Pemba's beautiful coast.


Enjoying a walk through the water and making my connection with the Indian Ocean. This was the first time sanDRina's been at sea-level since entering Africa at Alexandria.


Shopping for seafood for dinner the next night.


We picked up this pile of octupii for only 25 Meticais ($0.84).


He had this yellow-fin tuna going for around $30 and I thought about how much 'value' and price is added to food as it moves from where it is caught or harvested to where it is consumed. Here, we were consuming it where it was caught. Nothing fresher than that.


This is Rob, the biker I met at the backpackers. He's from South Africa but was living in Spain and was riding his Honda Africa Twin from Barcelona to Durban. Rob's a professional chef and was working at some of the top-rated restaurants in the world, such as El Buli, where plates go for around 250 Euros. So, we put our cooking gear together and made an...


...Octopus Curry!
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Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:23 AM   #1698
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Cool2 Back to the beginning...

March 26, 2013


Visiting my sister, Lavanya, in Hyderabad this week. She's a pediatric surgeon and works primarily at the government children's hospital and then freelances at a few other hospitals, like here at St. Theresa's Hospital, which is special to our family because I was born here This hospital caters to lower income families and my sister consults here for charity. When I was born here, my mom said it only cost 250 rupees for the delivery and a week's stay in the hospital. Today, it's still very cheap to deliver at St. Theresa's, costing 10,000 rupees ($184), which is how much those 250 rupees would be worth now.
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:35 PM   #1699
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I've been having adventures of my own and have not had time to keep up with yours, but I do have a bike question.
One of the bikes I'm shopping for is a DR 650. Almost all of my riding is above 5,000 feet where engine-cooling air flow can be thin. Given that the DR doesn't have liquid cooling, have you had any issues related to overheating?
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:59 PM   #1700
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
I've been having adventures of my own and have not had time to keep up with yours, but I do have a bike question.
One of the bikes I'm shopping for is a DR 650. Almost all of my riding is above 5,000 feet where engine-cooling air flow can be thin. Given that the DR doesn't have liquid cooling, have you had any issues related to overheating?
that is not an issue what so ever with a DR. even guys in Australian outback don't report overheating issues.
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Old 03-28-2013, 09:49 PM   #1701
Jammin OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBob View Post
I've been having adventures of my own and have not had time to keep up with yours, but I do have a bike question.
One of the bikes I'm shopping for is a DR 650. Almost all of my riding is above 5,000 feet where engine-cooling air flow can be thin. Given that the DR doesn't have liquid cooling, have you had any issues related to overheating?
Nope, no issues whatsoever of overheating due to altitude. My most extreme high-altitude riding was in Bolivia, where I spent about a week being above 10,000 ft and climbing up to 16,566 ft! and DR ran like a champ I think the colder temps that come with altitude make up for any loss in density.
Remember that the DR has a huge oil cooler, which is very efficient and Suzuki perfected this technology with their racing bikes and it works



Here's the video from that high altitude crossing and you can hear how the DR just purrs along

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Trip Website: JamminGlobal.com
Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 04-01-2013, 06:46 AM   #1702
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April 1, 2013


Bonda-wallas at Shilparamam Handicraft Village in Hyderabad, frying up fresh bondas, a deep-fried, fluffy, savory dough.

I enjoyed my week in Hyderabad. I gave an interview to the Times of India, met up with old highschool friends, Daya and Rohin, was given a thorough eye exam by my ophthalmologist brother-in-law, Pravin, and was taken shopping by my awesome sister, Lavanya.

I'm on a train heading back to Chennai, where I'll be awaiting the arrival of sanDRina in about a week. She's just landed in Singapore and should be getting on a ship to Chennai soon :)
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Trip Website: JamminGlobal.com
Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 04-01-2013, 07:05 AM   #1703
MrBob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin View Post
Nope, no issues whatsoever of overheating due to altitude. My most extreme high-altitude riding was in Bolivia, where I spent about a week being above 10,000 ft and climbing up to 16,566 ft! and DR ran like a champ I think the colder temps that come with altitude make up for any loss in density.
Remember that the DR has a huge oil cooler, which is very efficient and Suzuki perfected this technology with their racing bikes and it works



Here's the video from that high altitude crossing and you can hear how the DR just purrs along

Sweet. I recall my Suzuki Bandit beginning to seize while in evening traffic in Tallahassee. It too had the oil cooler but was an inline 4 rather than a single.
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:39 AM   #1704
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Cool2 Feature Published in Times of India

April 2, 2013

Here's a feature on my trip that got published today in the Times of India, Hyderabad Edition. Excuse the spelling mistakes and the embellished quotes

Click here for the online version: http://toi.in/3snqKa


(Click the image for higher res of the page scan.)
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Old 04-02-2013, 12:45 PM   #1705
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Awesome.

- Dan
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:26 AM   #1706
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Mozambique, Part 3: A Visit to Ilha de Moçambique, An Enigmatic Island
December 11 - 13, 2012

From Pemba, I headed south to Ilha de Moçambique (Mozambique Island), the small island that was the epicenter of Portuguese East Africa. It lies just off the coast, near Nampula, and at 3 kms long by 500 m wide, it's densely packed with old Portuguese colonial buildings and infused with Arabic and Swahili culture. Vasco da Gama landed on the island in 1498 and subsequently, the Portuguese established a naval base to resupply and protect their trade routes to India. Before the Portuguese arrived, an Arab merchant with the name of Musa-Al-Big was living there and his name was given to the island and later to the mainland.

Besides soaking in the colonial architecture and the relaxed vibe of Ilha de Moçambique, I was there to visit a charity organization called Projecto Oceano who run afterschool programs for the kids on the island. As per my duties to The Muskoka Foundation, who connect overland travelers with volunteer opportunities, I was there to see if Projecto Oceano would be a good partner for Muskoka.

(Click on the panoramas for the full size image.)


I left sunny Pemba and realized that I was riding straight into a thunderstorm. Battling the crosswinds made for a good workout.


Enjoying the sight of pointed inselbergs that dot the northern Mozambican landscape.


I caught up with the thunderstorm and just as before, I sought shelter with the locals as the heaviest of the rain and lightning passed.


Friendly guys and curious about this stranger on his grande moto.


The rain eased and after 409 kms (254 mi) from Pemba, I arrived at Causarina Camping, just across from Ilha de Moçambique. The place was empty and I setup camp under one of those thatched huts.


A beautiful view from my beach campsite. That's Ilha de Moçambique on the horizon, connected to the mainland by a single lane causeway.


The next morning, I boarded a pickup just like everyone else going to Ilha for the day. The driver waits till the truck is packed and that means patrons grab on to anywhere they can. (I'm telling you, I blend in so well with my one brown hand and one black hand :p )


Riding to Ilha de Moçambique on the single-lane causeway, which was built in the 1960s.


Fishermen walking on water. The bay is very shallow and the tides create dramatic changes.


Entering Ilha de Moçambique and passing through Makuti Town, where the majority of the island's inhabitants live. Renamo is the opposing political party in Mozambique and they fought a brutal civil war from 1977 to 1992 with Frelimo, who are currently in charge. Renamo generally control the north, which is less developed, while Frelimo controls the south, the more prosperous half of Mozambique.


I hopped off the pickup truck and strolled around empty Stone Town, noting this old madrasa (Islamic school).


The buildings on Ilha de Moçambique are pretty rundown but as captured here, there's quite an effort to spruce things up with some new paint and attract the tourists. I've been told that Ilha is like what Zanzibar was before it became popular.


Islamic tile art.


A friendly fruit vendor who encouraged me to try this...


...super sour fruit. He sprinkled some sea salt on it but it was still pretty sour. Hey, I'll try anything at least once.


Fishermen repairing their boat. Ilha de Moçambique was a big port in its hey days but things have slumped as business has moved to other ports, such as the new one at Nacala.


Time for a mid-morning snack and I found this hole-in-the-wall eatery. It was a family's house and I was sitting at their dining table with a bed to my right and a washing area in front.


They were serving up fried camarões (shrimp) for 5 Meticais ($0.17) for a bunch and 5 Mets for the boiled cassava. Served with a tangy hot sauce.
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:27 AM   #1707
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The man of the fried camarões house and...


...his daughter who was tasked with cleaning and washing.


Back on the streets and walking past the old armory.


A grounded dhow, which once transported people and now transports nutrients.


Cross and canon, the two arms of Portuguese colonization, at Fortaleza de São Sebastião.


The statue of Luis de Camões, a poet who fell in love with a local slave girl.


The old and the new. The entire island is a UNESCO World Heritage site and money is pouring in to renovate the dilapidated buildings and turn them into boutique hotels.


A star-shaped cake that a boy was selling down one of the numerous alleys in Stone Town.


Ganesha on Ilha. I stopped by the Hindu temple that's been here for a few centuries. Such a mix of cultures on such a small island.


The Hindu priest, stationed all by his lonesome self on Ilha. He was so excited to meet another Indian as his family is back in Diu, an ex-Portuguese colony in western India.


I met up with Rob, who rode down a day later than me from Pemba and we both met up with Jessica who runs Projecto Oceano.


Jessica having a weekly meeting with some of her students. Her organization provides afterschool activities for the kids as the educational system on the island is very basic. I was here to see whether Projecto Oceano would like to partner with The Muskoka Foundation, who connect overland travelers with volunteer opportunities in distant lands. I got the ball rolling and now, the next Muskoka traveler coming down Africa can choose to spend a few days on Ilha and run some workshops with Jessica for the kids.


The old port on Ilha, which traded heavily in spices, gold and slaves.


A guard and his friend playing their version of mancala next to a huge canon.


A papaya tree taking root in this poor old building. Given enough time, Nature will reconquer our bricks and mortar.


A beautiful coconut tree seen through a space among the crowd of old buildings.


Ilha de Moçambique and its beautiful beaches.


The day ending over the Church of Santo António.


Heading home down the colorful alleys of Ilha de Moçambique.


And it was time for Rob and I to head back to our campsite, across the bridge.

A beautiful day on Ilha de Moçambique and I'm happy I could visit her before commercialization takes over. There's tasty food, quiet and historical streets to meander through and beautiful, warm people to meet.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:43 AM   #1708
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Met Jai today. He had come to the Bessie beach to meet the Madras Bulls Enfield club boys.

It was nice listening to your ride stories Jai.

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Old 04-05-2013, 09:59 PM   #1709
Jammin OP
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Originally Posted by bharath316 View Post
Met Jai today. He had come to the Bessie beach to meet the Madras Bulls Enfield club boys.
It was nice listening to your ride stories Jai.
Thanks for warm welcome, Bharath. I enjoyed my first ride on a proper Bullet looking forward to the day ride tomorrow
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:38 PM   #1710
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nice

damn i am missing to meet you and the city ride tomorrow... Jai hope you are having a great time with Madbulls out there...
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