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Old 03-27-2013, 11:01 AM   #46
miguelitro
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Originally Posted by i_4ce View Post
Is there a surf board equivelant of a Harley? longboard?
you got it but there must be a leash on that longboard to reduce any actual cross stepping, nose riding, and soul surfing. those are the quivilent of the doo rag and leather vest.
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:24 AM   #47
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Used to surf. In my memory the mid and certainly in the late 70's is when it went "agro", first with the "surf nazi's", then the "surf punks" and I guess now its just about everyone. I suppose that's what happens when there's near exponential growth in a resource limited environment. I can tell you "back then" you'd never see some 35 year old young turk lawyers get out of their Escalade (or whatever) strip off their suits and into wet suits and go surfing for 30 minutes during lunch. It was a very different culture for sure. Surfing seemed to me to be the best low environment impact sport too, you ride something that exists for 40 seconds, and then its gone, magically replaced by another piece of natural art. Anyway, I generally find riders to be nicer and more helpful than when I started riding, which was before surfing for me.
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Old 03-28-2013, 07:20 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by miguelitro View Post
you got it but there must be a leash on that longboard to reduce any actual cross stepping, nose riding, and soul surfing. those are the quivilent of the doo rag and leather vest.
Mike
Hey, I've got a longboard and I'm under 50 . I always suggest wearing a leash though, mainly where I surf at is pretty rocky and I'm not up for dinging my board for no good reason. The only reason to not wear a leash would be if you surfing Mavericks or Teahupoo, where it could kill you, (RIP Mark Foo ).

Plus, unlike a harley, you can still get some good turns on a longboard, albeit not as aggressive as shortboards. I don't get a longboard to carve up waves though, I'm just looking to cruise and enjoy the ride......shit, maybe we are like Harleys after all
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:54 PM   #49
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[QUOTE=Any riders find a decent way to carry a 9' 2" on their bikes yet [/QUOTE]

Actually, yeah.

I just remembered this guy I met at Blacks while surfing there one time. He was on one of those dreadnought sized BMW GS's, with a 9' 6" and had traveled up and down Baja surfing for some years.

The rack was insane though...imagine a roll cage built onto the bike: the board was carried on the motorcycle just like it would be on a car on top of the vehicle instead of the side. So all that weight was carried above his head with the board flat above him, nose pointed forward as he rode.

He said the handling got weird once in awhile, but it was fine overall.

He also had that 1,000 yard stare of the hardcore surfer and/or overland motorcycle traveler.
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Old 03-28-2013, 09:02 PM   #50
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surfboard equivalent of a harley

Would for sure be a soft top funboard. Or even a boogie board:

Flailing in the impact zone, struggling to get out, ridiculous rash guards...the equivalent of under/no experienced 150 mile a year recreational cruiser riders duckwalking up to the stoplight wearing pirate gear.

Right?
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:14 AM   #51
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I started skiing at ~5 yo. and have been infected with the lateral-G / lean-to-turn thing ever since. Obviously it's taken me into motorcycle (approaching 4 decades), but also into skateboards, rollerblades, ice hockey, water skiing, road and mountain bikes etc. I still have an original Jake Burton snowboard, wood with metal fins, purchase from his garage shop in VT in the early 80s. Lived in Manhattan for a spell in the early 80s with the blades and bicycles as my primary transport... that was wicked fun - we used to try and race the bicycle messengers South (downhill) from Central Park during rush hour. It was like being an expert skiing on a very crowded beginner slope... cyclists and bladers weaving in and out of the giant pylon cars and terrorizing the pedestrians - if you hit anything, you could only blame yourself, all your risk were laid out in front of you - that required the most concentration ever. I still skateboard and rollerblade regularly, trying to exercise my dog, without exercising myself too much.

Never surfed, but I think the land-based carve sports have some very important motorcycling "training/practice" aspects over their water-based counterparts like 1) watching for, and reacting to, surface contaminants, 2) practice/knowing how to fall (tumble, roll, slide) without injuring yourself, 3) outright speed, 4) harsher reality of physics (surface is obviously harder, and with infinitely more immoveable objects to hit)... ie, you need to really understand your trajectory if you go balls-out and everything goes pear-shaped on you.

PS. Re Harley's... I wouldn't make too much fun of them. I only owned one (they're mechanically a POS) an XR1200, but I do have to admit it was seriously one of most fun carving bikes I've ever ridden (not fastest minded you... just most fun). The handling was slow (but true), so was the engine, but the gobs of low/mid range torque, without a ballistic high-siding horsepower, made it very uniquely qualified to carve the technical twisties with shit-eating grin. That was the only bike I ever owned that consistently ripped up the sides of its tires before the centers. CLICKY
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Old 03-29-2013, 09:55 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by stoke View Post
Riding a surfboard and a motorcycle are very similar in the way that they both demand total concentration and as such, are a meditative, mind clearing tonic. The feeling after doing both is about the same. Relaxed, calm, clear head.

That is the main similarity.

The second is that piloting a motorcycle also makes you a better surfer.

I have seen dramatic improvements in my surfing since I started riding again. Why? Well, you have to look where you want to go on a bike, and if you don't the consequences can be severe. So you learn to do it.

On a surfboard, looking where you want to go is everything, if you don't you fall. Thing is, it can take a while to really drive this point home on a board because falling isn't that big of a deal surfing. I've been making late drops and connecting up the waves better than ever, and maintaining speed all the way down the line. All due to looking where I want to go during decreasing radius turns and picking a line in the dirt.

The biggest difference between the two is that surfers, for the most part, all hate each other. No one talks to each other in the lineup and it's very competitive all the time. Yelling abuse at each other is common and a part of surfing.

Motorcyclists have this "we're all in it together" attitude, so you talk to each other at stoplights, wave on the road, group rides, etc. I love that.

If you surf and ride, what are some of your observations?
I have only windsurfed, so cant comment on pure surfing. But when I first started to learn to ride a bike it reminded me of skiing. You must keep your head up. If you look down in front of you, you wont make the turn.
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Old 03-29-2013, 10:27 AM   #53
Bo Radley
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what's not fine is that guy that ditched his board in front of me today, gave me a bleeding scalp cut from the fins on his board, and then told me to "watch it". I ended up chasing him out of the water. that's some dangerous stuff he's doing and if I didn't call him out, he would do it to someone else.
This is where vibing is necessary. Kinda like hockey and fighting...have to keep everyone honest. Dude ditching his board is just being lazy and not duck/turtle diving like he should. You're lucky you didn't get hurt worse. It's like a texting cager...

I find the zen of riding and surfing to be extremely similar. The calm, the focus, then the rush...
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Old 03-29-2013, 02:08 PM   #54
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what a great conversation

Regarding the harley thing: obviously you can ride! I got nothing against harleys (well, unless I'm stuck lanesplitting behind one with open pipes), just some of the riders don't really know what they're doing. Similar to a soft top board flailing in the impact zone or dropping in on people going down the line. Epic tire shot by the way.

Keeps everyone honest, I like that. Just a part of the culture like fighting in hockey. Never thought about it like that, but it is interesting that that's a part of the culture of hockey. I'm glad motorcyclists are the way they are though.

I skied and skateboarded with a brief foray in the 90's on blades for crosstraining in the summer for skiing, and yeah, they all do translate well into motorcycling, probably somewhat better than surfing considering the surface hazards you have to watch out for as mentioned earlier. Although surfing does have some surface hazards, namely, other surfers paddling out when you're going down the line!
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Old 03-31-2013, 01:24 AM   #55
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New Surfboards and New Motorcycles...

Well I have to buy a new surfboard all the time to keep it interesting and if you know what your looking for , sometimes . you find a Magic Board My latest stick is 9'2" x 22" x 3" triple redwood stringer semi-gun , shaped on a CNC computer machine and can handle 2 foot mush all the way to double overhead It has a performance rocker bottom so it goes rail to rail really fast and can carve sweet lines on big faces just like my latest new bike ... 2008 Suzuki GSX650F ...small roads or big roads , it just is so fun to s -turns and do cutbacks and roundhouse wraparounds , through all the cagers on my daily commute...Out of My Way KOOKS This is my 25th surfboard and I'm on bike number 35 ...56 years old and if you ask me , being in the ocean and riding my dirt bikes , streetbikes ...has kept me happy and healthy and Stoked...ALOHA...
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Old 03-31-2013, 01:55 AM   #56
jsalman93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoke View Post
Actually, yeah.

I just remembered this guy I met at Blacks while surfing there one time. He was on one of those dreadnought sized BMW GS's, with a 9' 6" and had traveled up and down Baja surfing for some years.

The rack was insane though...imagine a roll cage built onto the bike: the board was carried on the motorcycle just like it would be on a car on top of the vehicle instead of the side. So all that weight was carried above his head with the board flat above him, nose pointed forward as he rode.

He said the handling got weird once in awhile, but it was fine overall.

He also had that 1,000 yard stare of the hardcore surfer and/or overland motorcycle traveler.
Sounds a bit too extensive to me. I've seen the bicycle surfboard racks that they sell for an arm and a leg at surf shops. I would imagine you would make one yourself and probably fit it to a board, not sure about the handling though. I know that just carrying my board affects makes me turn wide when I'm just walking

+1 on the boogie board/harley comment. Just kidding around here, I like all bikes, I just don't really like all riders. Sort of like how I like all surfboards, I just don't like all surfers
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Old 03-31-2013, 01:54 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by stoke View Post
Actually, yeah.

I just remembered this guy I met at Blacks while surfing there one time. He was on one of those dreadnought sized BMW GS's, with a 9' 6" and had traveled up and down Baja surfing for some years.

The rack was insane though...imagine a roll cage built onto the bike: the board was carried on the motorcycle just like it would be on a car on top of the vehicle instead of the side. So all that weight was carried above his head with the board flat above him, nose pointed forward as he rode.

He said the handling got weird once in awhile, but it was fine overall.

He also had that 1,000 yard stare of the hardcore surfer and/or overland motorcycle traveler.

HEY! I saw that guy as well a few years ago. he was parked at Cardiff, just south of "the Kook". I admired his dedication

Definite correlation(s) between these sports, good thread Stoke.
BTW - I'll be signing up with Motoventures later this spring.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:37 PM   #58
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:54 AM   #59
booniebasher
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No need to be in the crowded lineup !!!

In surfing you many times you are forced into a certain area cause thats where the good waves are, this area can be mastered by the locals and as in the case of hawaii these locals band together like gangs at times ...i had many run ins in hawaii like this in the 80,s. on the DIRTBIKE you can go to your own area and not experiance the negative vibes i speak of. freedom to the max !!
motorcycling has freedom written all over it !!!
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Old 04-11-2013, 11:03 AM   #60
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In surfing you many times you are forced into a certain area cause thats where the good waves are, this area can be mastered by the locals and as in the case of hawaii these locals band together like gangs at times ...i had many run ins in hawaii like this in the 80,s. on the DIRTBIKE you can go to your own area and not experiance the negative vibes i speak of. freedom to the max !!
motorcycling has freedom written all over it !!!
I grew up surfing in Half Moon Bay. There was a very competitive surf scene there that started in the late eighties and grew exponentially as the locals began surfing spots that held bigger waves (not just Mav's). Surfing culture has a historic and often necessary pecking order. Good surf spots are limited, and enforcing the pecking order is where things get "testy." This is the not so fun part of surfing, and as I got older I often found that I was falling into that role. I moved to the mountains because snowboarding offered the same carving on edge feeling, without the hassles. After a few years of hundred day seasons, snowboarding started taking a backseat to riding my Dirtbike. I get the very same in the moment feelings with all of these sports. I also found that I like to scare the shit out of myself every once in a while. It can be quite head clearing!
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