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Old 03-03-2013, 08:57 AM   #16
JerryH
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Seems like they require scooters to be at least 150cc. I'm sure part of the route involves freeways. If not I need to talk to these guys.
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:11 AM   #17
hexnut
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
Seems like they require scooters to be at least 150cc. I'm sure part of the route involves freeways. If not I need to talk to these guys.
Since they have a 50cc class there are no freeways involved.

http://www.scootercannonball.com/res...012Updates.php
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:43 PM   #18
JerryH
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Wow, great information, thanks. Zillions of turns, but looks like it will work. I was looking for more direct routes.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:17 PM   #19
zomby woof
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
The other reason I wouldn't buy it is the same problem I have with my scooters. It is not freeway legal. I have over 26,000 miles on the 2 scooters together, much of it over and over on the same roads. I've gone everywhere I can from home without getting on a freeway. To go anywhere else I would have to haul them to a new starting point.
I have a CBR 125 too, and although it looks like a sportbike, it doesn't feel like one and will do highway speeds without any difficulty. When they first came here, everybody was convinced that we had a 250 cc minimum for highway use, and we don't. Then they said there was a 250 minimum for license testing, and there's not. I recall looking this up before, and don't think there's a CC requirement for highway use in AZ.
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:28 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by zomby woof
...When they first came here, everybody was convinced that we had a 250 cc minimum for highway use, and we don't. Then they said there was a 250 minimum for license testing, and there's not. I recall looking this up before, and don't think there's a CC requirement for highway use in AZ.
Illinois is definitely different from AZ. To pass a motorcycle road test, you must be on a bike with a 200cc (or bigger) engine. To legally ride on a divided highway or interstate, you must have 250cc or more (and the license plate reflects this - bikes with less than 250cc have blue letters/numbers while everything else has red letters/numbers).

I could see myself handling traffic, on an IL interstate, with a CBR125R. When I had my NX125? Not so much.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:39 AM   #21
JerryH
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I cannot find anything definitive regarding what is freeway legal in AZ, but it must have at least 150cc to take a motorcycle skills test on. It has been pretty much accepted that 150cc was also the freeway legal limit. It is in CA.

"Motor-driven cycle―A motorcycle with a 149 cc size engine or smaller. Be sure before you enter a freeway that the state has not posted any signs stating the operation of motor-driven cycles is prohibited on the freeway, you cannot legally ride your motor-driven cycle there."

What this means is that a vehicle with a 149cc or smaller engine is a motor driven cycle in CA, while a vehicle with one more cc, "150cc" is a motorcycle. One is freeway legal, one is not.

AZ did something similar when they approved their Motorized Bicycle Law. If the engine was 48cc or under, it was a motorized bicycle, and did not require a license, registration, or insurance. If it was at least 49cc, then it became a full blown motorcycle, with one exception left over from the '70s, which is still a distinct class here, the moped. A Moped is a factory built cycle with both a motor and functional pedals, and if restricted to 30 mph, requires only a moped endorsement, moped registration and plate (the plate says "MOPED" right on it, and insurance. "MOPEDS" are generally tolerated in the bicycle lanes if ridden in a responsible manner under 20 mph, and always yield the right of way to a bicycle. A "NOped" which is the same as a moped except having no pedals, is considered a motorcycle for all intents and purposes, except it is not freeway legal. AZ has no minimum speed limit on freeways.

I'll have to do some more research on what is freeway legal, but I have a feeling it is going to be 150cc.


Just found this. Looks like they are saying anything with at least 5 hp is freeway legal. The Zuma 125 has 11.

Thank You for contacting the Arizona Department of Public Safety. Motorcycles as defined by ARS 28-101.35 are allowed on full controlled access roadways in Arizona. Mopeds and motor driven cycles are not allowed on those roadways (28-101.30 and 28-101.31). The law that prohibits mopeds and motor driven cycles on full controlled access highways is ARS 28-733. I've included those laws for you:

31. "Moped" means a bicycle that is equipped with a helper motor if the vehicle has a maximum piston displacement of fifty cubic centimeters or less, a brake horsepower of one and one-half or less and a maximum speed of twenty-five miles per hour or less on a flat surface with less than a one per cent grade.

32. "Motor driven cycle" means a motorcycle, including every motor scooter, with a motor that produces not more than five horsepower.

35. "Motorcycle" means a motor vehicle that has a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and that is designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground but excluding a tractor and a moped.

28-733. Restrictions on use of controlled access highway

A. The director may, and local authorities by ordinance may, prohibit the use of any part of a controlled access highway under their respective jurisdictions by pedestrians, bicycles or other nonmotorized traffic or by any person operating a motor driven cycle.

B. The director or the local authority adopting the prohibition prescribed in subsection A shall erect and maintain official signs on the applicable controlled access highway. When the signs are erected, a person shall not disobey the restrictions stated on the signs.

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JerryH screwed with this post 03-08-2013 at 05:18 AM
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:55 AM   #22
Nanabijou
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I own a 2011 CBR125R. I recently had the engine swapped out with a Thai 150cc 4-valver from the 2011 CBR150R (the bike uses the same chassis as the CBR125R). The CBR150R was never imported into Canada. I also own a 2009 CBR125R. If you are thinking about purchasing a CBR125R, I strongly recommend the 2011+ generation for the following reasons:

Here are some reasons to consider the newer CBR125R over the older one.

1. Larger fuel tank.
2. Slightly larger chassis - with a bit more room. Very comfortable for me.
3. Only about 20lb or so heavier.
4. Digital speedometer that can be made accurate with a Speedo Healer.
5. Larger tires that provide more stability and are easier to find in Canada.
6. Midrange power seems to be better than the older bike (but have never tested this in any systematic and objective manner).
7. Love the mirrors on the fairing rather than on the bars.
8. Single headlight provides much better output for night riding, and people don't stop me and tell me that one of my "headlights are burnt out" anymore.
9. The newer design just feels more substantial - and better suspended.
10. I think the newer design looks better too (obviously, this is very personal).
11. The 2011 CBR125R (when I rode it throughout the Fall) seemed to be able to hold a true 90 km/hr (GPS) quite well. And perhaps due to the slightly larger chassis - there seemed to be less vibration making it's way up through the bars too - so the bike felt smoother.
12. The transmission seems to shift more smoothly on the newer generation. The previous generation seemed to have some gremlins related to 6th gear popping out at times.


I've actually toured and camped on the CBR125R - right across Ontario! It was tons of fun.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=810772&highlight=nanabijou

How does the CBR125R compare to similar sized scooters in terms of power?

A friend of mine has recently owned a Vespa LX150 and a Vespa GTS300. I've ridden them both. Both are really smooth and handle incredibly well. They're really easy to ride. And both of them accelerate well off the line (especially the GTS300) - but lose steam quickly on the top end.

A couple of years ago on a remote and deserted paved road I drag raced his LX150 with my CBR125R from a 5 mph running start. We were neck and neck through my first 2 gears on the CBR. However, as soon as I found 3rd - I left him behind rather dramatically. My fuel economy was also much better than his LX150. For me, the CBR125R is much more engaging to ride, puts its power to the ground better and gets better fuel efficiency. Then again - I've found scooters to be a convenient, well thought out, practical, stylish, and frugal mode of fun transportation. If you just want to ride around the city and need the practicality and ease of use of a scooter (incredible storage) - it's really hard to beat.

I went for a ride a couple of days ago on my 2011 CBR150R. First ride with the Thai CBR150R engine in my 2011 CBR125R chassis. The temp display on my car said 8C. Good enough for me.

Headed out on my usual run along Lakeshore Drive out to Wild Goose Beach. The bike felt great. Noticeably more power across the rev range compared to the CBR125R. And the sound is more throaty than its little brother too. It sounds great. With the 150R, you had better like the sound of a small displacement 4-valve single at high rpm - because that's where the tach will be sitting most of the time. Good thing it's relatively smooth when you wind it out. The road into Wild Goose was snow covered in places. But at around 300lbs wet, the bike is reasonably lightweight and easy to handle - apparently even through snow and ice.



You can see the remnants of our recent winter tale here. The snow is now melting fast (finally), but we got dumped on several times toward the end of the season.



It certainly doesn't look like good riding weather. But at no time was I ever cold. After a couple of hours - I was still cozy in my gear. The photo below is the beach parking lot.



And here is the Sleeping Giant and umm....the beach. You can see a section of an ice-racing track to the left.



I like comparing the same photo at different times of year. The contrast of seasons is pretty remarkable. The photo below was taken in July 2012. If you look closely, you can see people swimming in the cool waters of Lake Superior below. Hard to image this scene from the photo above.



Here's a closer look at the Giant. If you are wondering whether the Giant has somehow been decapitated, check out the other photos below that better capture the Giant in full glory.



From there I continued along Lakeshore and then took the Trans-Canada back to Thunder Bay so I could test the highway capability of the 150R. Overall - it did fine. However, I was facing a pretty severe headwind and found myself frequently dropping it from 6th (7800 rpm @ 100km/hr) to 5th (9000 rpm @100km/hr) in order to continue riding at my 100km/hr (GPS) goal. After taking some time to peruse the useful online Gearing Commander site, I think I might go with one less tooth on the countershaft sprocket. This would put me at 8400 rpm in 6th @ 100km/hr - right near the bike's torque peak at 8500 rpm. My older 2009 125R with this 150R engine ran similar lower gearing, and I think I like the extra jump the lower gearing gives me in the city, and I'm more satisfied with the way it works on the highway too. I also stopped at the Terry Fox Lookout too for a quick break and a few more photos.



Here is a plaque that describes Terry's "Marathon of Hope" journey.





Here is another gratuitous shot of the 150R (the wolf) in 125R (sheep's)clothing...




From there I visited the Bluffs overlooking the Current River for yet another view of the Giant. I didn't expect to see so many others enjoying the views and milder temps.....while pensively sucking back on some thinly rolled, sweet smelling...ummm... cigarettes.



I thought I'd stop by Hillcrest Park as well to take yet another shot of the Sleeping Giant. On the way there while waiting at a stop, a young guy drove by in a pickup and with the window rolled down yelled what sounded like "Nice Mike!" but I think it was "Nice bike!" Either way - I think the colours look pretty striking.



Here is another contrasting shot taken in June from a similar spot. You can barely see the outline of the Giant in the background.



I took one more photo before heading toward Oliver Road and onto the expressway. I wanted to stretch the 150Rs legs a bit.



Mike
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:55 PM   #23
klx250sfguy OP
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Great info

Hey man, great info you provided there. Your bike looks awesome.

We have a Terry Fox monument too, at the spot where he started The Marathon of Hope so many years ago. He's my hero.

This is a pic of my '82 Passport next to it, taken last November.

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Old 04-02-2013, 07:53 PM   #24
Nanabijou
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Originally Posted by klx250sfguy View Post
Hey man, great info you provided there. Your bike looks awesome.

We have a Terry Fox monument too, at the spot where he started The Marathon of Hope so many years ago. He's my hero.

This is a pic of my '82 Passport next to it, taken last November.

Nice monument to Terry. And great bike! I always wanted one of those to compliment my CT70 when I was a kid. I miss that 72cc wonder.

Mike
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