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Old 03-31-2013, 09:43 AM   #16
daveoneshot
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The Germans are still asleep.......Look at the Triumph Bonneville and the success it has now, along with the other companies creating retro bikes. And recently Honda just came out with their new CB 1100 blast from the past. All BMW has to do is build the retro R 90 S if they really want to make some money. But I'm off track here.....I bought an R 60/2 , a 1961, in '65 for 600 bucks and rode the spokes off it. Money was real then, our cash actually bought something.
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Old 03-31-2013, 10:51 AM   #17
PhilB
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BMW really made its reputation in the '50's and '60's, before the Japanese entered the market with serious bikes. Compared to the competition of the time, mostly British and Italian, the BMWs were somewhat heavy and slow, but were also a good deal more reliable and durable, more refined and better built, better suited for long travels. They pretty much invented the modern touring bike. Once the Japanese took over motorcycling, pretty much all of the old guard companies fell asleep or died for a couple decades. Even Harley, big and dominant as it was, mostly was moribund in the '70's and '80's, and the poor reputation they built during those years still haunts them some. Those that survived, including BMW, pretty much bumbled along on small scales for niche markets. Only in the last 20 years have any of the non-Japanese bike companies started to wake up and compete again. Now, BMW, Ducati, Triumph, Aprilia, H-D, and some others are resurgent and making good and serious bikes again. There has probably never been a better time for wide availability of a huge variety of top-notch bikes than now.

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Old 03-31-2013, 10:54 AM   #18
baloneyskin daddy
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I even think theres a new VW bus.
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Old 04-01-2013, 06:38 PM   #19
tokyoklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilB View Post
BMW really made its reputation in the '50's and '60's, before the Japanese entered the market with serious bikes. Compared to the competition of the time, mostly British and Italian, the BMWs were somewhat heavy and slow, but were also a good deal more reliable and durable, more refined and better built, better suited for long travels. They pretty much invented the modern touring bike. Once the Japanese took over motorcycling, pretty much all of the old guard companies fell asleep or died for a couple decades. Even Harley, big and dominant as it was, mostly was moribund in the '70's and '80's, and the poor reputation they built during those years still haunts them some. Those that survived, including BMW, pretty much bumbled along on small scales for niche markets. Only in the last 20 years have any of the non-Japanese bike companies started to wake up and compete again. Now, BMW, Ducati, Triumph, Aprilia, H-D, and some others are resurgent and making good and serious bikes again. There has probably never been a better time for wide availability of a huge variety of top-notch bikes than now.

PhilB
This is pretty much how I remember it. In the '60s if you wanted fast, it was British, or a Harley bobber. If you wanted reliable it was BMW. Then Honda changed everything.
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:10 PM   #20
bbrz
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Old Timers

Back in the mid 70's the BMW shops were Mom and Pop stores. Any one remember Underwood's in St. Joseph IL? Wanted an R90S, but at 3-4K it was a little costly at the time. A few years later (early or mid 80's) BMW had a blue and white Mosport Edition at Underwoods. Went there with money in hand to purchase my dream bike. The owner would not even talk a deal. Pointed at a brownish R65 and told me that if I wanted a BMW that I should start with that because I "did not deserve the Mosport". My want for a BMW died that day.
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:05 PM   #21
Bill Harris
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A few years later (early or mid 80's) BMW had a blue and white Mosport Edition at Underwoods. Went there with money in hand to purchase my dream bike. The owner would not even talk a deal. Pointed at a brownish R65 and told me that if I wanted a BMW that I should start with that because I "did not deserve the Mosport".
So did Underwood's die a slow and lingering death? That is pitiful.

My tale? 1974, I'd graduated college and gotten my first Real Job in Wedowee, AL. Decided that since I got through school and landed a job I owed myself a motorbike. Worsham's, the BMW dealer in Anniston, had a lone 1973 R60/5 Toaster that was last year's model with the New and Improved /6's on the floor. They wanted to deal. I wanted to wheel. The rest is history-- I'm still driving that bike today. I've toyed with the idea of trading up to a bigger/faster/better-chick-magnet bike, but never did the deed.




--Bill
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:53 PM   #22
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As I remember it (and I don't remember very well anymore, so correct me if I'm wrong), back in the 60's, the bigger bikes were mostly just the Harleys and Triumphs. I don't remember any bigger BMWs back then. I remember my dad had a single-cylinder 250CC BMW back then among his Harleys, but BMW in general didn't become popular in the USA until the 70's. The Japanese didn't start to compete in the big bike market until 1969 with the CB750.

All through the 60's and into the 70's, the U.S. Dollar was worth about 4 German Marks. Now, a Dollar is worth about 1.5 German Marks. Based entirely on the currency exchange rate, that makes German goods about 2.6 times more expensive than they used to be.
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Old 04-02-2013, 08:37 PM   #23
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Hi Bill.

Hannigan ??
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:45 AM   #24
Schnickelfritz
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My first BMW was a loaner R75/5, given to me by the owner of my local Motorrad for use while my consignment Guzzi LeMans was getting prepped. It had a big aftermarket fairing which I hated. I loved the bike, though, and the next time I bought a bike, it was an R75.
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Old 04-04-2013, 06:52 PM   #25
PhilB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MightyMouse View Post
As I remember it (and I don't remember very well anymore, so correct me if I'm wrong), back in the 60's, the bigger bikes were mostly just the Harleys and Triumphs. I don't remember any bigger BMWs back then. I remember my dad had a single-cylinder 250CC BMW back then among his Harleys, but BMW in general didn't become popular in the USA until the 70's. The Japanese didn't start to compete in the big bike market until 1969 with the CB750.

All through the 60's and into the 70's, the U.S. Dollar was worth about 4 German Marks. Now, a Dollar is worth about 1.5 German Marks. Based entirely on the currency exchange rate, that makes German goods about 2.6 times more expensive than they used to be.
Harleys and Indians were always big, but the BMWs were as big as the British bikes of the day -- 500cc and 600cc twins, when Nortons were 500 singles and Triumphs 650 twins at most. They all went to 750s in the '70's, and up from there.

PhilB
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:30 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by oldtrout View Post
Hi Bill.

Hannigan ??
Yep, Hannigan ST, an early 1980's Canadian vintage. Replaced the aging Vetter Windjammer last Fall.

--Bill
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:55 AM   #27
DC2wheels
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Right around 1980 I had already done a couple years of AAMRR in mod-prod with a 500cc twin and was looking for something a bit bigger for 2-up "sport-touring" (before it was even called that)

BMW never came into the picture- 25 y.o. married guy, I wanted something sporty looking.

NOT THIS: (old man bike)



BUT THIS:



Took us all over the northeast U.S. and eastern Canada.

Shoulda' kept that bike........
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:04 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC2wheels View Post
Right around 1980 I had already done a couple years of AAMRR in mod-prod with a 500cc twin and was looking for something a bit bigger for 2-up "sport-touring" (before it was even called that)

BMW never came into the picture- 25 y.o. married guy, I wanted something sporty looking.

NOT THIS: (old man bike)



BUT THIS:



Took us all over the northeast U.S. and eastern Canada.

Shoulda' kept that bike........
yep always liked the bm's

but too expensive

jap bikes and ducati's much better value

now bmw's much cheaper in comparison

in 2006 went to buy new bike

wife said I could

luck comes very rarely in my life

went to buy a ducati

when I compared them with the new k12s

no comparison

when it came to value for money

bike with up to date tech,

or an updated pantah 70's design

the top of the line duc was a lot more money

went for long test rides

I like twins

but the bmw was much better on my broken back, esa

2c

cheers
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:16 AM   #29
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I'm 55. My older brother has been riding BMWs since sometime in the early or mid 60's. He has made a career of them, and is an absolute artist with all of the older beemers. I think he works on everything 1996 and older.

Anyway, because of that, my earliest motorcycle memories all involve the sound and feel of immaculate, black, purring German machinery. He still has his 69S that he purchased new shortly after high school, as well as an 83 R80 G/S, a 58 /2, an R100S, a couple of K's, you get the picture. When I finally got around to getting my own bike later in life, there was no other sound or feel that even interested me.

I don't see the ugly that most on this forum seem to. My R100 GS take me everywhere I want to go, and I think it's a beautiful machine. I love the look, the sound, the reliability. What's not to like?
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:34 AM   #30
Offcamber
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I'm in my mid 40s and growing up BMW bikes weren't even on the radar. If you saw one it was a rich old mans bike. As kids many had Japanese dirt bikes. Transitioning to street it was logical to go Japanese, cheaper, reliable sporty and fast. Everything an 18 year old rider could want....Nobody I knew rode HD back then....again they were for old hippys. Now although I can appreciate different makes, I still only buy Japanese....why....reliable, cheaper, sporty more bang for the buck.....
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