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Old 03-06-2013, 07:11 AM   #121
mojave
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I'm another thread lurker, and here's my ramble. In 1978 I bought a brand new 1978 Bonneville and it is maybe the best bike memory of my 70 or so street bikes. Would I get another T140? No, unless it fell into my lap. I had a 2001 Bonne for a few thousand miles - TOR's, intake, Ikons, and fork work. Decent bike but kind of heavy, mild and boring, nothing like the T140. But that's not to say it isn't a superior highway bike to the 140, it is, there is no comparison really. A friend has a 500 Daytona, cute and fun in an old Brit way. Is it a conceptual basis of a modern offering? Perhaps with 15 more HP and a balanced engine - I'm watching the Honda 500 development. People mention Ducati Monsters, I think not comfy enough and with dry clutches and other Duc "features" to be that do it all bike the old Bonnie was. I owned a S4R for a while and never gave the plumbing a thought, it was a tough looking and functionally INSANE motorcycle. But ultimately it had a harshness and focus I couldn't embrace. I think anyone would think twice about taking their Monster very far down a dirt road. I used to slide my T140 through the corners in the dirt. Back a few years I was torn betwixt a Duc GT1000 and a gorgeous R1100S BCR. I picked the BMW which turned out to be monumentally dissappointing. I wished I had gone with the Duck, gas tank and all, as I liked the 2V engine of my MTS1000 (whatever it's other faults).

I'm in the faction that wants a ~400 pound 60 HP standard seating position balanced engine version of the old Bonnie. Not some corporate "platform" that starts off bloated so the engine can be incrementally enlarged to freshen up the offerings. I think the new Bonnie can be gussied up to look really nice, but it's still just too big and heavy. An "R" version? Ugh, then it's getting to be a HD XR1200, a bike I just didn't see the point of. Therefore, I'm not looking to Triumph (well, the Tiger 800 maybe) but to Honda and KTM.
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mojave screwed with this post 03-06-2013 at 07:27 AM
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:31 AM   #122
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A 1700cc tuned for more RPM (can I get 8K?) and 360 degree crank then stuffed into a lightweight frame-running gear would be boss.

Jack the thing up so that it can turn, put trials tires on the sucker.

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Old 04-05-2013, 07:51 AM   #123
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Originally Posted by jjgres View Post
A 1700cc tuned for more RPM (can I get 8K?) and 360 degree crank then stuffed into a lightweight frame-running gear would be boss.

Jack the thing up so that it can turn, put trials tires on the sucker.
When Triumph was developeing the T-Bird twin and had the first version ready, they put out on the road for testing.
And after the test they went back and added something on the order of 45 lb.s to the counter balancer shafts and crankshaft to get the vibrations down to a tolerable level. And this was with the 270 degree crank set up.

So the answer to your inquirey is a big fat no.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:47 AM   #124
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Right, because Thruxtons are coming with Ohlins shocks, USD cartridge forks, twin disc calipers and wheels sizes you can stick some performance rubber on. If we're getting even half of the stuff pictured, it still more than a "bold new colors" type of situation.
It's essentially an upgraded Thruxtron. To me it's too similar to the Thruxton to be called a "new" model. I compare it to a HD Road King and and CVO HD Road King.. Essentially the same bike, just lots more high end parts (suspension, components, etc)
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:51 AM   #125
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I did the same thing in 1979, a T140D.
Great bike in my book, and despite all the abuse a young guy could do to it over many (60,000) miles, I had no real trouble with it.
I had a 2005 bonne black with upgrades, and managed to put 5000 miles on it before I was sick of it.

I also had a 1979 T140E at the same time, and despite it being a bit of a rust bucket, it was fun to ride.

If Triumph came out with a 500cc version of the new Bonneville and got the weight down to the old 750cc bikes, I might like that, down on power but I like light nimble bikes and with the right tires, I could do dirt roads.

I guess its the motor, but Triumph seems to have spent zero time thinking about weight, and where the weight is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mojave View Post
I'm another thread lurker, and here's my ramble. In 1978 I bought a brand new 1978 Bonneville and it is maybe the best bike memory of my 70 or so street bikes. Would I get another T140? No, unless it fell into my lap. I had a 2001 Bonne for a few thousand miles - TOR's, intake, Ikons, and fork work. Decent bike but kind of heavy, mild and boring, nothing like the T140. But that's not to say it isn't a superior highway bike to the 140, it is, there is no comparison really. A friend has a 500 Daytona, cute and fun in an old Brit way. Is it a conceptual basis of a modern offering? Perhaps with 15 more HP and a balanced engine - I'm watching the Honda 500 development. People mention Ducati Monsters, I think not comfy enough and with dry clutches and other Duc "features" to be that do it all bike the old Bonnie was. I owned a S4R for a while and never gave the plumbing a thought, it was a tough looking and functionally INSANE motorcycle. But ultimately it had a harshness and focus I couldn't embrace. I think anyone would think twice about taking their Monster very far down a dirt road. I used to slide my T140 through the corners in the dirt. Back a few years I was torn betwixt a Duc GT1000 and a gorgeous R1100S BCR. I picked the BMW which turned out to be monumentally dissappointing. I wished I had gone with the Duck, gas tank and all, as I liked the 2V engine of my MTS1000 (whatever it's other faults).

I'm in the faction that wants a ~400 pound 60 HP standard seating position balanced engine version of the old Bonnie. Not some corporate "platform" that starts off bloated so the engine can be incrementally enlarged to freshen up the offerings. I think the new Bonnie can be gussied up to look really nice, but it's still just too big and heavy. An "R" version? Ugh, then it's getting to be a HD XR1200, a bike I just didn't see the point of. Therefore, I'm not looking to Triumph (well, the Tiger 800 maybe) but to Honda and KTM.
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:30 PM   #126
jjgres
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I had a '78 (?) Turnip 750. The brown/gold tank with brown seat. Had jubilee stickers. Very pretty. Slow, shook worse than a Sporster. Nice gearbox and clutch.

I never could warm up to it.

Anyway, wouldn't a 360 degree crank be easier than that goofy 270 to smooth out? Just a big single as far as the counterbalance shafts are concerned.
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Old 04-06-2013, 06:42 AM   #127
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There have been some excellant articles published in various magazines through the years dealing with the root and nature of vibration in engines.
The basic facts are that in an internal combustion engine the pistons have to come to a complete stop and reverse direction twice per revolution.
The 270 degree crank in a paralell twin is used to halve the weight coming to a stop at any particular time.
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Old 06-09-2013, 09:15 AM   #128
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Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post

The scrambler is the most silly thing they ever came out with, 600 pounds does not scramble.
An under 400 pound bike might scramble a little...
Silly. This occurred within 100 miles of where you live.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZNQkEPcm3c

Maybe you can't scramble on a Triumph Scrambler.

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Old 06-09-2013, 11:37 AM   #129
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Silly. This occurred within 100 miles of where you live.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZNQkEPcm3c

Maybe you can't scramble on a Triumph Scrambler.

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Old 06-09-2013, 06:20 PM   #130
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Originally Posted by TRRcheck View Post
It's essentially an upgraded Thruxtron. To me it's too similar to the Thruxton to be called a "new" model. I compare it to a HD Road King and and CVO HD Road King.. Essentially the same bike, just lots more high end parts (suspension, components, etc)
Saying things like "rebadged" and "bold new colors" gives the impression of something that is nothing more than an aesthetics job.

Triumph already has a history with Bonneville of adding additions (some more significant than others) and giving the bike a new moniker. Assuming Triumph were to build a bike similar to the one pictured, I don't think it would be unreasonable for them to do the same. That bike deviates more from a standard Bonneville than the Thruxton does IMO. And the alleged mule doesn't even have the final body work on it yet.
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Old 06-09-2013, 07:15 PM   #131
conchscooter
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One interesting aspect of the modern Bonneville is how much passion it stirs. Often it's viewed as a lost opportunity to recreate the superbike of our youth, and just as often it is scorned as a slow heavy lump hiding behind a badge. Yet it sells, massively, and not I believe because we who buy it have been fooled.

There are already as many versions of the new Bonneville as there are buyers, almost. Some few like me want a sedate comfortable ride in the tradition of a do-it-all with one bike ride, an old fashioned multi purpose tool. More often people take the basic, inexpensive bike and gussy it up to the tune of thousands of dollars.

I like the Hyde Harrier, not being a street tracker kind of rider. But my middle aged girth, slower reflexes and the likelihood of being killed by my wife if I said I wanted to spend $30,000 on a "faster Bonneville" all mean I will never own this beauty:


In the end if you really want a four hundred pound Bonneville all you have to do is make it. Add horsepower, suspension and all the other stuff so critical for your riding pleasure and there it is.

Or you can sit on the sidelines and moan and wait for the factory, currently in the black, to build your dream bike.

Me? I never did want a rattling, leaky 1970s Bonneville because there were a lot of better bikes available back then. Today too there are better bikes available than the modern Bonneville. Most of them in my opinion are ugly. And apparently they don't inspire the same cross eyed day dreaming the fat slow modern Bonneville does...
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