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Old 08-27-2011, 10:28 AM   #46
onesaintsfan
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Thumbs down -1

My biggest issue with the servo brakes ( owned 3 BMWs with them) is mainly the loss of feedback and ability to modulate them. Kind of like an on and off switch. Not to mention the un-need complexity of them. Should you have an issue, they would cost 2-3 times the cost to repair.

But the biggest reason is one thats been said here and elsewhere. If the Servo Brakes were so good and worked so well. Why did BMW discontinue them? Seriously? Why?

Thanks
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Old 08-27-2011, 10:39 AM   #47
Steptoe
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Originally Posted by BerndM View Post
To me, this seems to be a knee-jerk response by BMW to quiet down a VERY vocal bunch of riders who couldn't, or wouldn't adapt to the servo type brakes. Sadly, the riders who LIKED them didn't voice their opinions sufficiently to negate the whiners.
Depending on your age, do you remember the first time you drove your folk's car that had POWER BRAKES?? After learning in and driving cars with standard brakes, it took a while to adapt to the newer power brakes didn't it? Same thing with power steering.
I've had an 06 GS and an 05 Rt, both with servos, and I really like them.
To those who do NOT have the servo brakes, just wait till you get a bit older and start to develop some arthritis in your hands. You'll be searching the classifieds for a good used SERVO equipped bike.
The brake servos you refer to in your post don't depend on an electric switch . Which, if it fails means your brakes don't have the servo.

I've got a pile of servos in my workshop that have been removed from bikes to help form my opinion. .

Everyone loves their servos - until they fail.
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Old 08-27-2011, 10:43 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by onesaintsfan View Post
But the biggest reason is one thats been said here and elsewhere. If the Servo Brakes were so good and worked so well. Why did BMW discontinue them? Seriously? Why?

Thanks
Could be the cost of all the warranty claims, or the fear of a lawsuit.
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Old 08-27-2011, 03:11 PM   #49
Anorak
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Originally Posted by Steptoe View Post
The brake servos you refer to in your post don't depend on an electric switch . Which, if it fails means your brakes don't have the servo.

I've got a pile of servos in my workshop that have been removed from bikes to help form my opinion. .

Everyone loves their servos - until they fail.
I've got half a dozen servos in my garage from K's and R's, salvaged warranty units.
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Old 08-27-2011, 03:12 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by Steptoe View Post
The brake servos you refer to in your post don't depend on an electric switch . Which, if it fails means your brakes don't have the servo.

I've got a pile of servos in my workshop that have been removed from bikes to help form my opinion. .

Everyone loves their servos - until they fail.
I've got half a dozen servos in my garage from K's and R's, salvaged warranty units.

Since they're warranty units, you can deduce that they failed in fewer than 36k miles or 3 years.
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Old 08-27-2011, 04:03 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Steptoe View Post
They are so great that BMW no longer offer servo brakes.
Steptoe, please move to Winnipeg. I'll buy you a house!

Servo brakes are great until you have to shell out to fix 'em. They day they die on me is the day my girl gets a servo-ectomy.
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Old 08-27-2011, 04:19 PM   #52
bemiiten
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Steptoe, please move to Winnipeg. I'll buy you a house!

Servo brakes are great until you have to shell out to fix 'em. They day they die on me is the day my girl gets a servo-ectomy.
Paying to fix them is the least of whats wrong with servo brakes.
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Old 08-28-2011, 07:31 AM   #53
ricohman
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My '05 has had no issues with the servo system.
I do enjoy the power and the"grabby" part actually feels good when its in the - temps and your hands are cold even with the heated grips.
But I do feel like I'm riding a time bomb. If the servo fails I guess I will have to convert to a conventional system.
But the bike has worked as designed for 7 years.
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Old 08-28-2011, 10:08 AM   #54
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I've had them for over ten years. I like the way they stop but think the ABS2 was a better system. The IABS partial linked brakes do not work on wash board and I have actually run a few stop signs that had wash board as the brakes would not engage. (probable why they discontinued them) I also do not like having no brakes with the key off and very little braking if parked on a hill and just started the bike. And, my IABS is going south, hard to find used, and more than the bike is worth new.
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Old 08-28-2011, 08:35 PM   #55
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... I also do not like having no brakes with the key off and very little braking if parked on a hill and just started the bike. ...
Exactly the reason why I miss my '02 GSA! I currently have an '03.
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Old 08-29-2011, 04:21 AM   #56
John Smallberries
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Bleed!

BTW - I just did my second full brake bleed on my '05 this weekend as part of my 24k normal maintenance. The JVB DVD (and having done it once before) made it very easy. Buy yourself a little brake bleed kit with a catch bottle or IV bag to keep things neat and tidy. The tank is off in minutes and the bleed points on the module are easy to access. Don't be afraid of this job. I'm happy to take on this task every year if it keeps my servos healthy.

Thanks Jim Von Baden for foresight to use my exact bike in the demo DVD (except for the yellow trim and "Hello Kitty" side-bag).
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Old 04-05-2013, 02:19 PM   #57
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Don't forget the braided steel lines are simply rubber lines covered.
I thought braided steel lines have a rubber liner to contain the brake fluid. The braided stainless tubing that covers the inner rubber line does not expand, or has extremely minimal expansion, compared to stock rubber hoses, which expand like crazy, even when new.

Are you recommending that the life expectancy of steel lines or the inner rubber tubbing within the braided steel lines can break down over time?

I'm curious about the brake lines, as I'm about to install a set of spieglers stainless brake lines (front & rear) onto my 2000 R1150GS / ABS bike.

The bike has only 22k miles on it, but unfortunately many of the records were lost in the shuffle. So, I have to assume, for safety, that the brake lines are original. It's possible the fluid is also. The thought scares the heck out of me, though the bike will stop on a dime - squealing front brakes, and chattering ABS noises free of charge .
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:05 AM   #58
Rockmuncher
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I think everybody is right, me too. I like my servos, but if they calf, I'll have a spot under my tank to mount an air compressor.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:55 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by Wolftail View Post
I thought braided steel lines have a rubber liner to contain the brake fluid. The braided stainless tubing that covers the inner rubber line does not expand, or has extremely minimal expansion, compared to stock rubber hoses, which expand like crazy, even when new.

Are you recommending that the life expectancy of steel lines or the inner rubber tubbing within the braided steel lines can break down over time?

I'm curious about the brake lines, as I'm about to install a set of spieglers stainless brake lines (front & rear) onto my 2000 R1150GS / ABS bike.

The bike has only 22k miles on it, but unfortunately many of the records were lost in the shuffle. So, I have to assume, for safety, that the brake lines are original. It's possible the fluid is also. The thought scares the heck out of me, though the bike will stop on a dime - squealing front brakes, and chattering ABS noises free of charge .
Typically, high quality stainless lines have rubber beneath the stainless then a PFTE liner which is much more resistant to breakdown by the fluid. The stainless sheath serves two purposes, first it reduces the ability of the rubber underneath to expand, thus creating a firmer feel, second it protects the rubber from the elements and debris damage. The downside is that with the stainless sheath, one cannot visually inspect the rubber for damage. I replace the stainless lines on my race car every three seasons as PM but they are in a very harsh environment. Typically what causes damage is flying debris or less than optimal routing which can cause strains on the rubber near fittings etc. BMW does an excellent job IMO with proper routing so I wouldn't worry too much but squeezing the hoses near the fittings and in general all along and spots that have frequent movement is a good idea to asses the health of the hose in question

As far as the service intervals for changing brake fluids, I do a full flush every 6 months with a FRESH can of fluid, i.e. just opened. I ride a fair amount in the dirt so I like to help the system as much as possible. As a side note, on my race car I flush the fluid after every hard track day.

IMO, waiting 3-4 years to do a full flush on a high performance braking system is asking for trouble. The DOT 3,4 and 5.1 fluids, with some exceptions, are hygroscopic which leads to poor braking performance and corrosion.
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