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Old 04-08-2013, 06:45 PM   #16
rockmurf
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Has anyone posted up having put some mileage on the 1200, ie 50k miles or better. Since there have been 4 model years there should be some info on the longevity of this bike.
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Old 04-09-2013, 03:17 AM   #17
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Saw the new '13 Pikes Peak MS at the Duc shop in Greensboro two Saturdays ago. Simply a stunning m/c.. I didn't want to leave it behind. However, the cost of buying one is currently beyond my finances, especially when I'd likely want to add bags, a touring windscreen and - maybe - a Termi pipe ($2,600 - huh!?).

That puts the bike in K1600 money.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:51 PM   #18
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The stock exhaust is not bad. I have read several reports of guys stating that the exhaust upgrade was not worth the cost.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:55 PM   #19
deWog
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....except that the whole exhaust box weighs a ton !!. Remove it and you shave a good 7-8 kgs off the bike.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:08 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deWog View Post
....except that the whole exhaust box weighs a ton !!. Remove it and you shave a good 7-8 kgs off the bike.
$2600 to save 15 pounds? Think of it this way; you retain the cat and the bike is road legal. You can shave 15 pounds off of any bike these days by dumping the cat. There are ways to do that for $300 if saving the weight is what is on your mind.


It hardly lacks for power, and compared to...oh a K1600 comes to mind....weight is not the issue.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:10 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockmurf View Post
Has anyone posted up having put some mileage on the 1200, ie 50k miles or better. Since there have been 4 model years there should be some info on the longevity of this bike.
The bikes are holding up. Search the forum here or at ducati.ms for the high milers and their stories. Dr. Greg ought to be along shortly to answer this. The newer ones are even better as they deal with most of the niggles.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:16 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGS View Post
Saw the new '13 Pikes Peak MS at the Duc shop in Greensboro two Saturdays ago. Simply a stunning m/c.. I didn't want to leave it behind. However, the cost of buying one is currently beyond my finances, especially when I'd likely want to add bags, a touring windscreen and - maybe - a Termi pipe ($2,600 - huh!?).

That puts the bike in K1600 money.
No doubt the Multi is not a cheap bike, really expensive by the pound but you can buy an S and it comes with everything you want except the paint job and the wheels. You can live happily without both as most of us are doing. The bike performs the same. You have to ask yourself if you need the vanity stuff for the extra $3500 (plus tax) by the time you get the bags, the grips and the paint. The experience is no different. I do think that if you are planning on grips, the panniers (and perhaps the center stand) that makes the S a pretty good deal compared to the standard bike, but that's always another option.

I'm feeling like a salesman, but you see them say this a lot here: if you ride it, you understand the appeal.
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Old 04-10-2013, 05:10 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pampero View Post

It hardly lacks for power, and compared to...oh a K1600 comes to mind....weight is not the issue.
Agreed..... (about the power); it wants for nothing.

But for small guys like me (5'6") every extra kg on my tip toes makes it just that little bit harder not to drop.

Still it could be worse: my old GSA1200 weighed 260kgs and felt like I needed a ladder just to climb on the damn thing.....!!
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Old 04-11-2013, 12:32 AM   #24
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My 2 cents...

I had a chance to ride the MTS. Demo ride at Pro Italia a couple weeks ago. Impressions...OMG!

I'm 54 and have been riding a Kawasaki ZZR1200 for the last 11 years. LOVE the ZZR, but even with it's moderate forward lean on the riding position, I found my neck getting more sore as my age advanced.

So I began the search for, most likely, the last bike I'll ever own. I had heard/read much about the MTS and while sitting in a bar for happy hour one evening last October, I decided to call Pro Italia in LA and put a deposit down on a Granturismo sight unseen.

Now my mission was to get a demo ride. Fast forward to a couple weeks ago and I called Pro Italia, spoke to Rick, and set up an appointment for a demo ride.

Once down there and all the formalities confirmed...credit card, insurance, etc...I was off on a silver touring MTS. The first thing I noticed was the weight, or lack of it. Even though it's a taller bike than the ZZR, the weight difference is immediately noticeable. However, it IS a taller bike. With the stock seat, only the balls of my feet touch the ground (I'm 5'9").

Comfort...ohhh, it is soooo nice to be able to sit upright, what a difference on the neck. The seat was quite comfortable, my buns seemed to fit nice and snug, the passenger seat providing support behind me, kept me from sliding around. Supposedly the 'low seat' option is about an inch lower, so when traveling 2 up, I'd prefer that option. I like to have my feet solidly on the ground when the wife is either getting on or off the bike. She only weighs about 100 lbs, but the stability of two feet firmly planted, is reassuring.

The Ride...this has to be one of the easiest bikes I've ever ridden. The riding position is so comfortable, the power is sneaky fast. Where the ZZR pulls like a tractor from any gear, the MTS is more subtle, but then a glance at the speedo going down the 2 on the Pro Italia 'loop', the speedo shows 100 and it's like...really???

I arrived back at Pro Italia only to find out that Rick left for lunch with my credit card, so Ben says "Rick won't be back for an hour, wanna take the bike back out"? Well, after a big smile from me, I said "heck yeah" and made my way to The Crest. Up towards Mt. Wilson I head.

For months I've read all the accolades about the Multi, now it's time to check it out for myself. Into Sport Mode and up, up, and away

Like I said, this bike is easy to ride. It's comfortable, I could ride the bike for hours and my neck would be fine. It took about 15 minutes to realize this bike is made for FUN. It sticks when you lean, it goes faster, easier than anything I've ever been on, the power is FUN, the brakes are incredible, and the SOUND of the engine....well I've never really heard anything like it. It's cool!!!

On the way back to Pro Italia I noticed two things. One, the bike height didn't bother me at a stop, with only the balls of my feet on the ground. The bike is so light compared to my ZZR, that one foot planted is more than comfortable. Although two up, I think I'd still prefer two feet down. Second, people notice this bike. Every time I stopped at a light and people walked across the crosswalk in front of me, someone said "nice bike" or a thumbs up.

Bottom line...I'M SOLD. Any second thoughts I might've had, disappeared somewhere on The Crest...

I'd also like to send a 'shout out' to the guys at Pro Italia. Bob, Rick, and Ben, you guys rock! I can't imagine buying an Italian beauty anywhere but at Pro Italia. I'm counting the days until mine arrives
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Old 04-11-2013, 02:29 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pampero View Post
No doubt the Multi is not a cheap bike, really expensive by the pound but you can buy an S and it comes with everything you want except the paint job and the wheels. You can live happily without both as most of us are doing. The bike performs the same. You have to ask yourself if you need the vanity stuff for the extra $3500 (plus tax) by the time you get the bags, the grips and the paint. The experience is no different. I do think that if you are planning on grips, the panniers (and perhaps the center stand) that makes the S a pretty good deal compared to the standard bike, but that's always another option.

I'm feeling like a salesman, but you see them say this a lot here: if you ride it, you understand the appeal.
Great comments.. all true. I was back up to G'boro yesterday, and couldn't help but notice that the PP also doesn't come with a centerstand. For $22K you'd think they'd put a fookin' centerstand on the bike.

My pockets aren't deep.. so if I decide to pull the trigger, it'll likely be on the 'S'. Still waiting on the demo bike to come in.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:20 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deWog View Post
Agreed..... (about the power); it wants for nothing.

But for small guys like me (5'6") every extra kg on my tip toes makes it just that little bit harder not to drop.

Still it could be worse: my old GSA1200 weighed 260kgs and felt like I needed a ladder just to climb on the damn thing.....!!
A cat delete drops most of the extra avoir dupois and can be done for a fraction of the Termi's cost. But that adds another component; noise. Some people like it that way, I don't, so I'll stick with the stock exhaust. Or, you can go with a full Arrow or Leo Vince at half the cost of the Termi.

I'm not convinced that the extra weight saved is that noticeable as a function of balance at low speed since most of it is in the cat and that is virtually at the lowest point of the bike. In respect to performance the weight is a factor, but in respect to balance at a dead stop I think it's less so. I have a vivid imagination so I could be making this up as we go along.

I'm 5'11" with a 30-31" inseam and can flatfoot the bike but clearly that's a lot taller than 5'6". I'm not sure how I'd feel if about it if I were 5'6", so I take your point about the weight, but you might consider mine: the bulk of the savings is down low.

I also had a GS prior to the Ducati and this bike is much lighter feeling in all respects, but swinging a leg over it is very little different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCGS View Post
For $22K you'd think they'd put a fookin' centerstand on the bike.
For me a center stand is a non-negotiable requirement on a touring bike, but the PP is the sporty version of the line which is how they justify the stand delete. You also get some carbon, but again, I view that as a vanity feature. I like carbon as much as the next guy and if I were into that aspect and factoring costs, it could be a plus for the PP, but it does nothing to improve the riding experience so for me it adds little value.

Most guys who get PPs end up touring them anyway and putting all the extras including the stand on them, so agreed, for a committed distance rider you can add that cost as well. The S Touring hits the sweet spot for my matrix.

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Old 04-16-2013, 10:52 AM   #27
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Update on 2013 Multistrada Part 2

Update 4/16/13
This is update from this thread from when I first bought the bike on 3/26/13.
Go to this thread for the first part:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=875001


Just got back from Death Valley, 3 days, 1155 miles of mostly twisty roads and very little freeway.
Total of 1800 miles on the bike now and I have the following insights on the 2013 Multistrada S Touring.

#1 outstanding component of this bike is the comfort level!!!
After 3 days of 6 to 7 hours of riding twisty roads, averaging 385 miles a day I was very, very comfortable the whole time. My 6’3” frame, 235 lbs. fat ass, and 60 year old bones with some serious diseases I survived and felt good but tired at the end of the ride.
It is hard to swing my leg over due to a broken right hip as a kid and some old bones but I make it. Once on the bike the only complaint is the passenger seat could be back one inch, this is minor and I may just keep it this way.

#2 the suspension is outstanding. I still can’t explain SkyHook but I like it and I know it works. I have done nothing to the suspension not even set the SAG and it is smooth, compliant and works for my riding style. I can probably improve it by setting the SAG and adjusting the front springs to be stiffer but it is so good I don’t want to touch it.

#3 is that damn motor in 3 and 4th gears is just so cool. The gearing is almost perfect and I can see why guys go with the 14 tooth front sprocket but I like it the way it is. Railing the 80 mph sweepers and the 60 mph twisties is addicting and worse than crack. The sound of the motor is just awesome for me since I don’t like loud but I do like to hear the motor sing.

#4 This was the perfect bike for this trip. Kept it in touring mode 80% of the time but when we went over a pass with VERY sandy roads so I set the mode to urban and took it easy around the corners and no problems. The other riders all slipped out a little, I had no slippage or traction problem. The throttle was very smooth and I could control my turns precisely.


Observations:
I am used to cruising with my past bikes at about 4000 rpm but this seems to be lugging the Multistrada engine. This may improve as it gets broken in more.

Gas mileage was really affected by the amount of right wrist applied. But as I got more miles on her she leveled at just about 41 mpg.

Mirrors are too shaky for me. On my FJR everything is the mirror was crystal clear but too much shake with this twin. It has gotten a little better with mileage but probably something I am going to have to adjust too. Just a small complaint.

I think a smaller windscreen and better helmet will help with the noise. After about 3 hours the noise level is excessive. I now ride in a modular HJC helmet that broke on the trip and going to switch to a Shoei Qwest. The lower windscreen I think will give me smoother air over my helmet. We will see.

Have not taken it on any fire roads yet. Will in the next couple of weeks and report back.

So when I buy this bike again?
YES!!

Is there any buyer’s remorse on spending this kind of $$ on a motorcycle?
NONE.

Glad I bought the bike and I was giddy when I finished the 3 days, tired but giddy.
Still have a lot to learn with this bike and explore different suspensions, riding modes, etc.
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:54 AM   #28
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Update part 2 can be found here:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=879421
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:14 AM   #29
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Nice report, and sounds like a great trip!

On the mirrors the DP mirrors with turn signals in them have a different shape and are much better on being able to see, although they are slightly smaller in overall size. Not as much vibration with them, not sure why.
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Old 04-16-2013, 06:29 PM   #30
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Nice report, and sounds like a great trip!

On the mirrors the DP mirrors with turn signals in them have a different shape and are much better on being able to see, although they are slightly smaller in overall size. Not as much vibration with them, not sure why.
I've never owned a bike with truly outstanding mirrors. I'm trying to remember if my K1200's mirrors were better as that was a remarkably smooth motorcycle, but I can't recall as it's been awhile. Maybe the FJR is also an exception. I find my bike (a '12) is adequately smooth while cruising in all gears above 4000 RPM, but calling on big handfuls of throttle in sixth does bring out a bit of "shivering." I would think the 13s are only better in this regard. These bikes do take a few thousand miles to truly break in. I dream of 41 MPG!
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