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Old 04-07-2013, 06:36 PM   #14521
happyclam
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Question for you engineers?

What's the total horsepower?Sorry, couldn't resist.
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Old 04-07-2013, 08:02 PM   #14522
mgorman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
how?

From what I have understood, (and I could be totally wrong) cush drives and rubber dampers in CS sprockets were put on bikes to keep the transmissions and clutch baskets from being torn up from shock fed though the chain drive when the tire has plenty of grip. On a dirt bike, the tire is always in some state of slip but on a road bike, all the shock waves from the road and motor get transmitted through the parts with slop in them such as transmission teeth and the ears on clutch plates which are much softer than gears. Once you have those dents beat into the basket, the tabs want to ride there instead of moving on an even plane causing either drag from not being able to move apart or slipping under power from not being able to slide back together until the power is let off. (I think I typed that right ) I did have to file one basket to get it smooth so my clutch would work properly, I believe it was my KTM 495

It also dampens chain snatch and from what I have read, helps eliminate spline wear on the coutershaft sprockets. Some bikes had spring dampers in the clutch baskets also. I switched to a solid JT on my 950 and it feels like there is much more unwanted vibes coming through so I will be going back to a dampened unit when I replace the chain.

One of the articles I read years ago talked about testing their motocross engines (I believe it was KTM) in street bikes because the wear and tear on them would be more dramatic per hour than if they tested them off-road. One of those items they were testing for was drive train durability due to riding on pavement.

There is a lot of force going through those parts. My 86 Can-Am 560 Sonic used to eat swing arm [needle] bearings on the drive side. They didn't rust or seize, the outer race would literally be pounded thin like smashing a penny in one of those souvenir machines or under the wheel of a train and expand almost a 1/4 wider than new. I found a way to get 2 narrower bearings from a Husky which added up to a wider width a to fit in the space allotted with a little modification. I never had to replace the non drive side. The rear wheel also had 2 bearings on the drive side vs one on the non-drive side.

My TA's chain is getting due for replacement so I'll find out soon what those splines look like. One thing I do know is none of my Euro bikes use the keyed keeper to hold on a floating sprocket, they are all fastened solid via retaining nuts. All my XRs and XLs prety much have had the same spline/sprocket set up




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Old 04-08-2013, 03:07 AM   #14523
Thunder Dan
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Originally Posted by TRBaron View Post
I'm using those CDIs [on my '87] too and I only run 98 octane [unless I need fuel and there is none of the good stuff].
As I understand it higher octane fuel can be compressed more before it detonates, so you can change the ignition timing for more compression before detonation if you run higher octane fuel.
So if you run standard 91 then you don't really want that advanced timing.

I don't know what the economy on my bike was because I've only used it since I did a bunch of work [including new CDIs] to get it roadworthy after 20 years of storage, but now it runs 4.5-5l per 100km at 4500rpm [90kph] or less and 5-6l on highwqay/freeway [120kph or over 5000rpm].

It also eats too much oil at freeway speeds IMO for an engine with only 30k~ km on it.
I used 2L of oil on a 4000km trip a couple of weeks ago. seems like too much to me anyway.


btw those consumption numbers are for a fully loaded trip with me [fat barstard] and all my camping gear onboard plus a jerrycan of fuel extra strapped on.
Thanks for that. That's pretty good fuel consumption numbers considering the load & speed.
Yep, the old engines use oil. No two ways about it.

Cheers,

Dan.
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Old 04-08-2013, 07:56 AM   #14524
Ladder106
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Quote:
It also eats too much oil at freeway speeds IMO for an engine with only 30k~ km on it.
I used 2L of oil on a 4000km trip a couple of weeks ago. seems like too much to me anyway.
That's maybe a bit high but what are "freeway speeds" for you?

Pull the airbox drain plug down by the CS sprocket. I bet you'll find most of your oil there. Be ready for at least a coffee cup full of water and oil to come out so don't do this on a nice floor.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:17 AM   #14525
showkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
That's maybe a bit high but what are "freeway speeds" for you?

Pull the airbox drain plug down by the CS sprocket. I bet you'll find most of your oil there. Be ready for at least a coffee cup full of water and oil to come out so don't do this on a nice floor.
+2^^^^^^

That equals about a liter in 1200 miles.......high speed and higher temps I would consider totaly normal for a TA.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:30 AM   #14526
ghulst
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Originally Posted by K4yakk0 View Post
Hi, this is last version of my '98 transalp.


Here during my trip in Tunisy

How did you make the screen?
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:58 AM   #14527
K4yakk0
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Originally Posted by ghulst View Post
How did you make the screen?
This is the way i build the screen and the other parts


First I shaped a block of foam


than i covered it with scotch tape and put fiber glass and epoxy resin.


The parts before cutting and painting
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:30 PM   #14528
Jim Rowley
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Originally Posted by K4yakk0 View Post
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:57 PM   #14529
ghulst
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Looks good. But did you shape the windscreen the same way? It looks smoother and see-through. Nice work btw. Looks awesome.
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Old 04-08-2013, 03:40 PM   #14530
TRBaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
That's maybe a bit high but what are "freeway speeds" for you?

Pull the airbox drain plug down by the CS sprocket. I bet you'll find most of your oil there. Be ready for at least a coffee cup full of water and oil to come out so don't do this on a nice floor.
Freeway is anything over 110kph, usually at least 120kph.

RPM between 5500 and 6000.
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:54 AM   #14531
ravelv
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:)

Many of old CDI's have this problem... I think, more powerfull spark at higher RPM's is reason fuel is burned less.
Another one is ignition advance- stock CDI's have it for 91 fuel, which I cannot even get here... Mostly we have 95 and 98. These aftermarket CDI's allow to use normally also 95-98 (I now use only 98, because this fuel does not have these "biological" and "green" (*(&^*&%^*&!) additives...).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder Dan View Post
G'day Ravelv,

Sorry about that, I didn't think to go back and check. There was nearly a 12 month period I missed when my twin boys were babies. Thanks for the link, it was a good read. It was interesting about how the spark weakens was the RPM increases on the standard CDI's. I thought the whole point to CDI's was to maintain consistent spark!

I work with a couple of High Voltage electricians who have previously explained (to the best of my limited electrical comprehension..) the benefits of IGBT's, and how quickly they can work (switch on / off).

Interesting to note the 'Advanced Curve' is typically only beneficial with 95 + octane fuel??

Have you tried switching between the curves?


Cheers,

Dan.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:14 AM   #14532
Transalp1999
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Originally Posted by Das_Schnellste View Post
Whatever came stock on it. Everyone keeps saying to switch the sprocket to a larger one to lower my RPMs.
Check out this link to determine what ratio works best for you.

http://www.gearingcommander.com/
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:24 AM   #14533
bartender
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New TransAlp owner!

I got my hands on an semi-torn down 89 TransAlp over the weekend, and after some time in the garage putting all the bits back together, it started up like a champ. I'm actually a bit on the fence about the bike, mostly because my favorite bikes have always been air cooled, had kickers, and were mostly devoid of plastic. With that said, I've been kicking around the idea of trading for an XR600R, but the more I think about it, the more I want to keep it and build it up.

So, I've been making my way through this incredibly long thread and must say you guys have compiled a serious volume of great information here. Thank you!

My plans at first:
19" front wheel - this bike will be almost strictly for commuting
18" rear wheel
Upgraded rear suspension - I've worked with Klaus at EPM on some shocks previously, so I may go that route. I'm 6"3' and all legs, so I'd like to kick the height up a bit. In this regard, can I just order a longer than stock shock, or should I pick up either an RD03 or RD04 rear swingarm and knuckle and then order a shock to match those components?
Upgrade front suspension - Is there a preference between XRR and XRL front ends?

Once these bits are sorted out, I'll get to work on more of the aesthetic changes.



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Old 04-09-2013, 10:55 AM   #14534
showkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartender View Post
I g

My plans at first:
19" front wheel - this bike will be almost strictly for commuting
18" rear wheel
I do not see a cost benefit on the wheel change. Especially on the rear.......I get the more street orientation front.......but still question it in real world commuting as the TA can do that all day with stock wheels. Just thinking out loud..........
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:36 AM   #14535
Ladder106
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Welcome Bartender,

It looks like a nice example of a TA.

I'm a bit confused by your plans. I don't know why you'd want to go the expense of changing out the front rim for a smaller size (there are many good street tires available for the 21 in rims) and then talk about raising the front suspension.

Also moving to an 18 in the rear will increase your selection of off-road tires but will restrict your selection of street oriented tires.

Dropping the pegs down a bit makes the TA much more comfortable for people with longer legs.

If you do indeed remove the front rim (and it's free of corrosion) let me know. I may be interested in buying it from you.

If used on the street, I'd not go through the trouble of a swingarm swap. The rear drum brake is quite adequate for the street.
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