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Old 04-17-2013, 07:11 PM   #61
Snowbound
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Location: Crystola ,Colorado
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+1 on #19 . Mine has been dropped , missing a tooth or two after it got dropped while running . Still pumps up my skid loader tire .
I use the CO2 to seat a tire and finish with the pump .
It has been used a lot in the three years that I have had it .
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Old 04-20-2013, 05:26 PM   #62
RomaDakota
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Location: Oz
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Here is a comparison between the pumps I have.
The Stop-n-go weighs in at just under a pound. The naked pump about 1.5 pounds and the Cyclepump around 2 pounds. I have used them all and all worked fine. The chuck on the Cyclepump is a bit fidgety. Due to size and weight, the Stop-n-go travels with me offroad and on trips (the gauge is nice also). The naked, stays in a sidecar bike and the Cyclepump stays in the truck.

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Old 04-20-2013, 09:02 PM   #63
TUCKERS
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Nice comparison, thanks Man.

The Stop and Go looka appealing
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Old 06-14-2013, 09:42 AM   #64
BigToad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
I have a stripped version I concocted in my car, but on the bike I thought it may get full of grit and let me down.
Just wrap the pump in a rag, when you use it just lay the pump on the rag, did that for many years with no problems
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Old 06-14-2013, 10:08 AM   #65
HaChayalBoded
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigToad View Post
Just wrap the pump in a rag, when you use it just lay the pump on the rag, did that for many years with no problems
Add a 6" mini bungee to the pouch. Then hang the pump off the bike. This way you do not have to hold it up by one of the cables (cause it gets too hot to hold onto the pump directly) and you do not have to put it down on the ground where it will grind and drag around from the vibration.
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Old 06-14-2013, 10:29 AM   #66
perterra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juggernaut View Post
Anyone know how much pressure you can get out of a CO2 cartridge? I've thought of switching over since they are more compact, but have no idea how they work on motorcycle tires.

This may have been answered already, on my goldwing the 12 grm cartridge would give me 5 psi, on the KLR one will bump the front to about 10 to 12 lbs and a rear to about 8 psi.

If you get a CO2 get one that doesnt have to be threaded and buy the 12 grm pellet gun cartridges, they are about $15 for a box of 25 or $20 for a box of 40
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:10 PM   #67
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Glad to find this - I was looking for something small and I looked at the specs and that Stop and Go mini air compressor is rated at 6AMPs (12v) so she will be fine with the 7.5amp fuse on the standard battery tender hookup to supply power. $37 certainly sounds better then $100 but both sound better then a hand pump

http://www.stopngo.com/mini-air-comp...ers-atvs-only/

The Cycle pump is rated at 10 - 12 AMP at full load which might mean I would need to rewire my battery tenderer hookup assuming the 7.5Amp fuse they use is based on the wire then use?
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:51 PM   #68
X1Glider
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Why mess around with an electric pump? All bikes come with an air pump as standard. It's called your engine.

The OP has a boxer. Easiest solution is Engine-Air's spark plug hose adapter. I've been using a similar one for years for the 2 boxers and dozen american v-twins I've had as well as a handful of dirt bikes.These types of bikes make it easy to get to the spark plug so it makes good sense.

On my 2 cylinder FI bikes, I pulled the fuel pump fuse to make sure there were no gas fumes going into the tire and removed the other plug to make it easier work for the starter motor. The carb bikes, I just shut off the petcock and take out the other plug as well. Gave it a few cranks to get any residual fumes out before installing it into the plug hole. Then, the tire airs up quick and can even seat a bead...at least it can on a big twin. The smaller cylinders in a 4 might be a different story, I don't know about that.

If you don't mind gas fumes in your tires, you can leave in the other plug and let combustion happen to make the motor turn over instead of just using the starter.

I don't use this on my Ninja 1000 though. I'd have to remove the side plastics, lift the tank, undo the upper and lower halves of the airbox before being able to access a plug.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:10 AM   #69
ERD
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Location: Dallas, Texas, USA
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I'm using the Stop N Go kit, mostly because I am a dealer selling it. The Slim compressor works well too as the engine cylinder pump. I've had to use the pump a few times a all of them worked well but are slooooow to fill up. The only thing I do not like is the engine cylinder air pump. Not a fan of removing the spark plug on a hot engine so I can fill up the tire.

I have a real air compressor at home and at the shop for regular air top off so I only use the portable compressor on the road.

For the money, I would pickup a Slim compressor and sticky sting tire repair kit for a total of $20 from Walmart and call it a day.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:15 PM   #70
gmiguy
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Location: Western NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by X1Glider View Post
On my 2 cylinder FI bikes, I pulled the fuel pump fuse to make sure there were no gas fumes going into the tire and removed the other plug to make it easier work for the starter motor. The carb bikes, I just shut off the petcock and take out the other plug as well.
...
If you don't mind gas fumes in your tires, you can leave in the other plug and let combustion happen to make the motor turn over instead of just using the starter.
I thought the Engine-Air pump design uses cylinder pressure to pump atmospheric air into the tire, meaning it won't pass any fuel to the tire.
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Old 11-14-2013, 01:02 PM   #71
se123
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Joined: Oct 2013
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the BikeGear looks solid

Quote:
Originally Posted by farcall View Post
I've owned both of these http://www.webbikeworld.com/r3/motor...irman-sparrow/ and just recently bought this one from Bikergear in South Africa.

Slime and Airman worked OK, if not a bit slow, and are very lightweight. Whilst they fill the tyres with air OK, they don't fill me with confidence ... I remember reading somewhere they have some plastic internal bits (I'm not saying they do... just that I read it) which wears out over time.

Whilst I haven't tried it yet, judging by the weight and construction of it, the Bikergear pump seems to be everything their web blurb says.

I spend too much time hundreds of kms from any town and out of phone range to be second guessing whether my pump will do the job when needed most. That's why I've shelved the other two.
How much did that run, I didn't see a price
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Old 11-14-2013, 05:03 PM   #72
farcall
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Originally Posted by se123 View Post
How much did that run, I didn't see a price
788ZAR incl post which approx equals $USD77.

Ask them to pack it in heaps bubble wrap. The plastic feet on mine broke in transit. After 5 emails to them and not one reply I gave up.

Product 10/10. After sales customer service 0/10.
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